Native Art Weekend March 27-29, Burke Museum

Seattle—“Culture is not stagnant. Through contact and the technological revolution, Tlingit culture is constantly adapting, observing, and searching for its place in the world,” said Alison O. Bremner, Tlingit artist. 

Alison O. Bremner is one of 14 artists participating in the Burke Museum’s Northwest Native Art Market on Sunday, March 29. Bremner is a Tlingit artist born and raised in Southeast Alaska. Painting, sculpture, jewelry and digital collage are a few of the mediums the artist employs. In additionPhoto by Steve Quinn

Alison O. Bremner is one of 14 artists participating in the Burke Museum’s Northwest Native Art Market on Sunday, March 29. Bremner is a Tlingit artist born and raised in Southeast Alaska. Painting, sculpture, jewelry and digital collage are a few of the mediums the artist employs. In addition
Photo by Steve Quinn

 

Bremner is one of 13 artists participating in the Burke Museum’s Northwest Native Art Marketon Sunday, March 29. Born and raised in Southeast Alaska, painting, sculpture, jewelry and digital collage are a few of the mediums she employs. In addition to her contemporary practice, Bremner is committed to the revitalization of Tlingit culture in her hometown of Yakutat, Alaska.

Presented in conjunction with the Here & Now: Native Artists Inspiredexhibit, the Burke is hosting a weekend-long celebration of Northwest Native art. Don’t miss this unique opportunity to purchase original works directly from artists. Also attend a two-day art symposium that brings together Native artists and scholars to discuss current trends in the distinctive art traditions of the region.

 

ArtShop: Northwest Native Art Market
Sunday, March 29, 10 am – 4 pm
Burke Museum
Included with museum admission; FREE for Burke members or w/UW ID

 

Don’t miss this unique opportunity to purchase original art directly from artists. The market will feature prints, jewelry, apparel, carvings, sculptures, and other works by 13 emerging and established Northwest Native artists. Art demonstrations including basket weaving, skinning and painting a drumhead, carving using traditional tools, and jewelry-making will be ongoing throughout the event.

 

100% of proceeds go directly to the artists.

 

Eagle Rattle, by Alex McCarty. McCarty is one of 14 artists participating in the Burke Museum’s Northwest Native Art Market on Sunday, March 29. He will be selling his art and holding a carving demonstration on how he uses traditional tools to shape his work.Photo courtesy of Alex McCarty.

Eagle Rattle, by Alex McCarty. McCarty is one of 14 artists participating in the Burke Museum’s Northwest Native Art Market on Sunday, March 29. He will be selling his art and holding a carving demonstration on how he uses traditional tools to shape his work.
Photo courtesy of Alex McCarty.

Participating Artists:

Alex McCarty (Makah): Woodwork
Alison Bremner (Tlingit): Jewelry
Charles W Bloomfield (Pyramid Lake Paiute): Apparel
DeAnn Jacobson (Duwamish/Suquamish): Bead work
Israel Shotridge (Tlingit): Jewelry, woodwork, graphic design
Jason Reed Brown (Koyukon Athabascan): Metal work
Jennifer Younger (Tlingit, Kaagwaantaan): Jewelry
Joseph (wahalatsu?) Seymour, Jr. (Squaxin Island/Pueblo of Acoma): Drums
Linley Logan (Onondowaga AKA Seneca): Prints and cards
Lou-ann Neel (Kwakwaka’wakw): Jewelry
Mary Goddard (Tlingit): Woven Jewelry
Michelle Price (Navajo): Cedar vases
Roger Fernandes (Lower Elwha S’Klallam): Original paintings & design

Northwest Native Art Market Media Sponsor: KING FM.

 

ArtTalk Symposium: Conversations on Northwest Native Art
ArtTalk Keynote Program: We Got Styles!
Friday, March 27, 7 pm, Kane Hall 210, UW Campus
ArtTalk Symposium
Saturday, March 28, 9:30 am – 4 pm, Kane Hall 225, UW Campus

Both days: FREE; pre-registration recommended at burkemuseum.org/events
Join leading scholars and Native American/First Nations artists as they present recent research on Northwest Native Art. The symposium celebrates the 50th anniversary volume of Bill Holm’s influential book, Northwest Coast Indian Art: Analysis of Form. Speakers will examine the last 50 years of combining innovation and tradition, and envision the future of Northwest Coast art.

The weekend program will begin with the ArtTalk keynote.  Dr. Robin K. Wright, director of the Bill Holm Center at the Burke Museum, will reflect on the study of Northwest Coast art styles and the remarkable things that have resulted from the interactions between Northwest Coast art scholars and artists over the past 50 years. She will be joined by Shaun Peterson (Puyallup/Tulalip artist) and David R. Boxley (Tsimshian artist) in a conversation about Northwest Coast art styles from their own experience, and what they foresee for the diverse mixture of rapidly expanding Northwest Coast art styles for the next half century.

Talks on Saturday will include topics such as collaborative research, community based scholarship, retrospectives on Northwest Coast art history, indigenous methodologies, and challenging pre-conceptions of contemporary Northwest Coast art.

For a complete schedule of talks and list of presenters, go to burkemuseum.org/events.

This symposium is made possible by support from the Walter Chapin Simpson Center for the Humanities, University of Washington.

Native American tribes converge to discuss pot legalization

Audience members look on at a tribal marijuana conference for tribal governments considering whether to legalize marijuana for medicinal, agricultural, or recreational use, Friday, Feb. 27, 2015, in Tulalip, Wash. Representatives of 75 American Indian tribes from 35 states gathered to discuss what might be the next big financial boon on reservations across the country: marijuana. Tribes have been exploring the idea of getting into the pot business since the Obama administration announced in December it wouldn't stand in their way. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)

Audience members look on at a tribal marijuana conference for tribal governments considering whether to legalize marijuana for medicinal, agricultural, or recreational use, Friday, Feb. 27, 2015, in Tulalip, Wash. Representatives of 75 American Indian tribes from 35 states gathered to discuss what might be the next big financial boon on reservations across the country: marijuana. Tribes have been exploring the idea of getting into the pot business since the Obama administration announced in December it wouldn’t stand in their way. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)

By The Associated Press

TULALIP, Wash. (AP) — Tribal representatives from around the country are converging in Washington state to discuss the risks and rewards of marijuana legalization.

Tribes have been wrestling with the issue since the U.S. Justice Department announced in December that it wouldn’t stand in their way if they want to approve pot for medical or recreational use. The agency said tribes must follow the same law enforcement priorities laid out for states that legalize the drug.

Representatives of dozens of tribes are attending a conference Friday at the Tulalip Indian Tribe’s resort and casino north of Seattle.

Topics under discussion include the big business potential for pot, as well as concerns about substance abuse on reservations and the potential creation of a tribal cannabis association.

Speakers, from right, Hilary Bricken, Douglas Berman, Salvador Mungia and Robert Odawi Porter bow their heads during an opening prayer at a tribal marijuana conference for tribal governments considering whether to legalize marijuana for medicinal, agricultural, or recreational use, Friday, Feb. 27, 2015, in Tulalip, Wash. Representatives of 75 American Indian tribes from 35 states gathered to discuss what might be the next big financial boon on reservations across the country: marijuana. Tribes have been exploring the idea of getting into the pot business since the Obama administration announced in December it wouldn't stand in their way. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)

Speakers, from right, Hilary Bricken, Douglas Berman, Salvador Mungia and Robert Odawi Porter bow their heads during an opening prayer at a tribal marijuana conference for tribal governments considering whether to legalize marijuana for medicinal, agricultural, or recreational use, Friday, Feb. 27, 2015, in Tulalip, Wash. Representatives of 75 American Indian tribes from 35 states gathered to discuss what might be the next big financial boon on reservations across the country: marijuana. Tribes have been exploring the idea of getting into the pot business since the Obama administration announced in December it wouldn’t stand in their way. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)

 

 

Speakers Salvador Mungia, left, Robert Odawi Porter and Douglas Berman prepare to speak at a tribal marijuana conference for tribal governments considering whether to legalize marijuana for medicinal, agricultural, or recreational use, Friday, Feb. 27, 2015, in Tulalip, Wash. Representatives of 75 American Indian tribes from 35 states gathered to discuss what might be the next big financial boon on reservations across the country: marijuana. Tribes have been exploring the idea of getting into the pot business since the Obama administration announced in December it wouldn't stand in their way. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)

Speakers Salvador Mungia, left, Robert Odawi Porter and Douglas Berman prepare to speak at a tribal marijuana conference for tribal governments considering whether to legalize marijuana for medicinal, agricultural, or recreational use, Friday, Feb. 27, 2015, in Tulalip, Wash. Representatives of 75 American Indian tribes from 35 states gathered to discuss what might be the next big financial boon on reservations across the country: marijuana. Tribes have been exploring the idea of getting into the pot business since the Obama administration announced in December it wouldn’t stand in their way. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)

 

Robert Odawi Porter speaks at a tribal marijuana conference for tribal governments considering whether to legalize marijuana for medicinal, agricultural, or recreational use, Friday, Feb. 27, 2015, in Tulalip, Wash. Representatives of 75 American Indian tribes from 35 states gathered to discuss what might be the next big financial boon on reservations across the country: marijuana. Tribes have been exploring the idea of getting into the pot business since the Obama administration announced in December it wouldn't stand in their way. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)

Robert Odawi Porter speaks at a tribal marijuana conference for tribal governments considering whether to legalize marijuana for medicinal, agricultural, or recreational use, Friday, Feb. 27, 2015, in Tulalip, Wash. Representatives of 75 American Indian tribes from 35 states gathered to discuss what might be the next big financial boon on reservations across the country: marijuana. Tribes have been exploring the idea of getting into the pot business since the Obama administration announced in December it wouldn’t stand in their way. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)

 

Salvador Mungia speaks at a tribal marijuana conference for tribal governments considering whether to legalize marijuana for medicinal, agricultural, or recreational use, Friday, Feb. 27, 2015, in Tulalip, Wash. Representatives of 75 American Indian tribes from 35 states gathered to discuss what might be the next big financial boon on reservations across the country: marijuana. Tribes have been exploring the idea of getting into the pot business since the Obama administration announced in December it wouldn't stand in their way. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)

Salvador Mungia speaks at a tribal marijuana conference for tribal governments considering whether to legalize marijuana for medicinal, agricultural, or recreational use, Friday, Feb. 27, 2015, in Tulalip, Wash. Representatives of 75 American Indian tribes from 35 states gathered to discuss what might be the next big financial boon on reservations across the country: marijuana. Tribes have been exploring the idea of getting into the pot business since the Obama administration announced in December it wouldn’t stand in their way. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)

 

S. Dakota Republican accuses Common Core of contributing to Native American deaths

South Dakota state Rep. Elizabeth May (R) [YouTube]

South Dakota state Rep. Elizabeth May (R) [YouTube]

By Arturo Garcia, RawStory.com

A South Dakota lawmaker made the bizarre claim on Tuesday that Common Core educational standards was partly to blame for a rash of deaths among Native Americans, Think Progress reported.

“We’ve buried eight kids down on that reservation in the last week,” state Rep. Elizabeth May (R) said. “We need to sit up and pay attention. I’m not naive enough to think the Common Core is what’s causing all of this, but it’s part of the effect. We’ve got teachers down there who have just quit teaching it.”

May did not mention any specific cases or even name which of the state’s nine reservations where these deaths occurred. She said she had spoken to an unidentified “Indian educator” who opposed Common Core but had not been able to discuss the issue with lawmakers.

Indian Country Today Media Network reported last week that five Oglala Sioux teenagers had committed suicide on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation over the past two months. However, the curriculum was not cited as a possible reason for any of the deaths. Yvonne DeCory, who works with a tribal suicide prevention program, mentioned bullying, poverty and “tenuous family relationships” as factors.

“Being a teenager is hard,” DeCory said. “Being raised by your great-grandma because your parents aren’t around, that’s a hard life. You don’t stay young long on the reservation. You have to grow up pretty fast.”

May made her remarks as legislators debated revisiting a bill that would have repealed Common Core within the state. As MSNBC reported earlier in the day, the state spent $4 million to implement it and is slated to begin testing based on the standards next month. The bill had failed to advance in the House Education Committee a day earlier.

“This is a very emotional topic — especially for me,” May said. Despite her efforts, however, the effort to bring the bill back to the House floor was defeated.

Gold medal propels Billy Mills’ cause

Only 10,000M Olympic champ in U.S. history still helping fellow Native Americans

His dark early days could not overshadow the joy of Billy Mills' Olympic triumph in 1964. (AP Photo)

His dark early days could not overshadow the joy of Billy Mills’ Olympic triumph in 1964. (AP Photo)

By Brianne Mirecki, ESPN.com

When Billy Mills raced to one of the biggest upsets in Olympic history — winning the 10,000-meter gold medal at the 1964 Tokyo Games — a lot of people wanted to congratulate him.

Mills received a telegram from his best friend, Leroy Chief, and his cousin, Harry Eagle Bull. A note from John Glenn challenged Billy, a fellow Marine, to a race – the competitive Glenn said he’d ride his motorcycle, and if he didn’t win, they’d have to race again with Glenn on his rocket ship.

But perhaps the most unique congratulation originated over 5,700 miles away from the athlete’s village in Tokyo and took a bit longer than a telegram to reach Mills.

Back on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation where Mills had grown up, just before the race he wasn’t supposed to win, the community filled a sacred pipe with tobacco and prayed to the four directions, to mother earth and to the creator, that Billy would represent himself with dignity, and in so doing represent his people — the people of the Oglala Lakota (Sioux) tribe and the United States — with dignity.

When Mills returned home from Japan, the tribe held a powwow in his honor and bestowed upon him his Lakota name: Tamakoca Tekihila, which translates to “Loves His Country”.

It was a name Mills would live up to not just on Oct. 14, 1964, when he won the only 10,000-meter Olympic gold in U.S history, but every day since that epic race.

The Path To The Medal

The story of Mills’ journey to the Olympics reads like a Dickens novel. Born to Grace and Sidney Mills on June 30, 1938, on the Pine Ridge Reservation in South Dakota, Billy Mills joined a family that would soon number eight children. His parents divorced when he was young, but he was close with both and devastated by the death of his mother when he was 8, and especially by the loss of his father four years later.

One of Mills’ strongest memories of his father is from a fishing trip the two took shortly after his mother’s death.

“My dad looked at me and told me, ‘Son, you have broken wings.’ He said I had to look beyond the hurt, hate, jealousy, self-pity. All of those emotions destroy you. He said, ‘Look deeper son. Way down deep is where the dreams live. Find your dream, son. It’s the pursuit of a dream that’ll

Billy Mills jostled with Tunisian Mohamed Gammoudi on the way to the gold medal. (AP Photo)

Billy Mills jostled with Tunisian Mohamed Gammoudi on the way to the gold medal. (AP Photo)

heal a broken soul.'”

Mills’ environment did not lend itself to the fulfillment of dreams. Pine Ridge is consistently one of the poorest communities in the United States, and suffers from a crippling mix of complicating issues: alcohol abuse, unemployment, youth suicide and others.

Besides these immediate barriers, the native community was under legal and psychological attack from the federal government — Mills’ date of birth is closer to the massacre at Wounded Knee than it is to today, and the American Indian Religious Freedom Act wasn’t passed until 1978 — and people struggled to maintain their identity in the face of a government mandate to assimilate. He says he grew up with the knowledge that his people had experienced “our own genocide.”

Mills’ father was Oglala Lakota, but his mother was white, which means that their child is iyeska, a Lakota term which he translates as “mixed blood”. At times Mills felt held at arms length by the most traditional and full-blooded native people. Achievement, measured by accolades like academic and athletic success, sometimes seemed to come at the expense of community.

He did well enough academically to gain admission to the Haskell Indian School (now the Haskell Indian Nations University), but the school was far from his family, in Kansas, and choosing to leave the reservation brought additional scrutiny and wariness from the native people who stayed.

Mills says that those Oglala who chose to go to the school were “rejected twofold. Those traditionalists … couldn’t understand why we were trying to engage in the society that had basically created the genocide of us. And society basically rejected us. The theme of the day was the melting pot. But the melting pot, if you look at it from the Native American perspective, was to take the Indian-ness out of me.”

Running became Mills’ escape from his personal struggles. No matter what was going on in his life, when he ran, he found tranquility. At Haskell, Mills’ running prowess caught the attention of college coaches, and he entered a world even more removed from his native community when he enrolled at the University of Kansas. he seemed to be doing well, but internally he was struggling.

“Racism in America was breaking me,” he says. “Nobody knew, but it was breaking me.”

Mills says he came frighteningly close to committing suicide, “close enough to scare me to this day.” But in his darkest moment, he heard a voice.

“I just heard energy: ‘Don’t. Don’t. Don’t.’ The fourth and last time, soothing, powerful, gentle loving, very direct, ‘Don’t.’ And to me it was my dad’s voice. I got off my chair and I wrote down a dream to heal a broken soul. I wrote ‘Gold medal, 10,000 meter run.'”

Healing A Broken Soul

The journey toward his dream is an epic tale that has already been the subject of a feature film, “Running Brave.”

He found some success in college, becoming a three-time All-American in cross country, but his career really took off when he joined the Marines and married his college sweetheart, Patricia. The Marines offered stability in the form of a special training camp for Olympic hopefuls, medical expertise that identified and helped manage the Type II diabetes that had caused Billy to unexpectedly crash in previous races, and a strong mentor in the form of coach and Olympic gold medalist Tommy Thompson Sr.

Coach Thompson’s belief in Mills’ dream was a key component of his success, but even more important was the confidence and support he drew from Patricia, who put her own goal of a career in art on hold in order to support his training.

In a time when Olympic athletes were still held to the strictest definition of amateurism, Patricia was his one-woman support crew, providing meals and snacks to help manage his diabetes, caring for their newborn daughter, and providing emotional support when almost no one else believed in Mills’ dream.

In Tokyo, Mills had memorized where Patricia would be sitting before the race — 95 yards from the finish, 32 seats up. In visualizing the race, he

Even after crossing the finish line, Billy Mills was unsure he'd actually won the race. (AP Photo)

Even after crossing the finish line, Billy Mills was unsure he’d actually won the race. (AP Photo)

designated it as the point where he would start his all-out sprint. Despite going up against athletes such as Australian Ron Clarke — the reigning world record holder who had run nearly a minute faster than Mills’ personal best — Mills’ belief in himself never wavered. His goal was to win.

When the gun fired on race day, Mills hung with the leaders, despite a pace for the 10,000-meter race that was nearly as fast as his best for 5,000 meters. On the final lap, he found himself one of just three men in contention for the win, sitting on Clarke’s shoulder with Mohammed Gammoudi of Tunisia just behind him.

The bell lap played out like an obstacle course as the leaders weaved around nearly a dozen lapped runners, and Billy was pushed off balance twice in the jostling for position. Stumbling into lane 2 in the aggressive fray, Billy seemed to fade out of contention on the backstretch when Gammoudi surged. Mills approached Patricia’s seat about eight yards behind the leaders.

Coming off the curve of the straightaway, just under his wife’s position, a lapped runner began to float wide, and Mills saw daylight: space to sprint for victory. He pumped his arms, lifted his knees, and gave it all he had. Glancing left at a lapped runner, Mills thought he saw an eagle on the competitor’s singlet. He remembered his father’s words: “The pursuit of a dream will heal your broken wings.”

He flew with the wings of an eagle to the finish line, breaking the tape first.

The Giveaway

Despite dreaming about the victory for years, Mills could hardly believe his dream had come true. When an official came up to him immediately after the race and asked, “Who are you?” Mills momentarily panicked, fearing he had somehow stopped a lap early. In footage from the race, you can see him holding up one finger, asking a question.

The Japanese official confirms with a single raised finger of his own: first place, Olympic champion. Mills laughs, still seemingly disbelieving, and waves to the crowd.

What does one do then as a newly-crowned Olympic gold medalist? Mills knew generally what he wanted to do after the Olympics.

In the Lakota tradition, someone who has experienced success holds a “giveaway,” a ceremony that recognizes those who have supported them on their journey and gives back. But Mills wasn’t sure how to hold his giveaway. The tribe had been his entire existence, and he was overwhelmed by the number of people he wanted to recognize and share his victory with.

Again, Mills turned to Patricia. Her suggestion? “Take the inspiration that was given to you and pass it on to another generation.”

Since the medal ceremony in Tokyo, the rest of his life has been a choreographed giveaway. The process began in 1983, when Mills worked to create “Running Brave,” which chronicles his Olympic journey. He still meets strangers around the world who tell him they were inspired by his movie.

The giveaway started working in earnest, though, when Mills met Gene Krizek, a World War II veteran with extensive connections in Washington who had just started his Christian Relief Services charity. Concerned about the plight of Native Americans, Gene enlisted Billy’s help as a spokesperson for a new charity dedicated to bringing “resources and a sense of hope” to American Indian communities.

In honor of Mills’ achievements, the two named the charity Running Strong for American Indian Youth (http://indianyouth.org/). The charity serves the community through activities such as organic gardening initiatives, helping to weatherproof homes, funding projects to document and preserve native culture and language, and, of course, fundraising through road races.

Since 1991, Running Strong has donated more than $41 million in programs and services that benefit American Indian youth and native communities across the country. Mills’ official role with Running Strong is to serve as national spokesperson, which he does in addition to his day job as a professional speaker.

Mills is on the road for upwards of 300 days a year, speaking to diverse groups at museums, universities and in the military, his broad perspective

Chip Somodevilla/Getty ImagesBilly Mills received the 2012 Presidential Citizens medal for his work with American Indian youth.

Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images
Billy Mills received the 2012 Presidential Citizens medal for his work with American Indian youth.

providing inspiration with which just about anyone can identify. Most of his speeches emphasize “global unity through the dignity, character and beauty of global diversity.” Billy speaks with deliberation and passion, his calm, soothing voice belying the urgency of his message.

He has a teacher’s ability to explain the wider historical context of an event or problem, and a belief in people’s ability to work together that is so strong as to be spiritual. The combined effect is to produce a broad understanding of our interconnected problems and a confidence that good people will be able to fix them. It is this spirit that inspires his latest endeavor.

Mills wanted to do something special in October in recognition of the 50th anniversary of his gold medal run. Of all the problems facing the youth of Pine Ridge and other Native American communities, he is most concerned about “the poverty of dreams”: the grind of financial poverty that can rob American Indian youth of the ability to imagine a better future and chase after their goals.

As his father said all those years ago, “it is the pursuit of a dream that will heal a broken soul.” So, the Dreamstarter project (http://indianyouth.org/Dreamstarter), launching this year, encourages young people to imagine a way to improve their community and then provides logistical and economic support for that dream.

For each of the next five years, 10 young dreamers will be selected to have their vision come true. The applicants must find a mentor organization to work with in implementing their ideas, and will participate in a leadership skills-building conference in Washington, D.C., before receiving $10,000 from Running Strong for American Indian Youth to help make their dreams a reality.

The program is notable for the agency that it provides to the grant recipients. Besides general themes for each year (this year’s theme is wellness, next year’s is the arts) and the stipulation that projects must be aimed at communities composed primarily of native people, there are few restrictions on what the dreams can entail. I

Instead of throwing money at a problem, the Dreamstarter program empowers young people to identify a problem in their communities and come up with a solution. Essentially, Mills is creating leadership.

“Loves His Country,” the name given to Mills by his tribe after his race, has a dual meaning, because as a mixed-blood iyeska, Billy has two countries and loves them both.

His love for his Lakota Sioux tribe has led him on his 50-year quest to give back to the community and improve the lives of native people in America. And his love for the United States, evidenced by his service to the federal government as a Marine and his representation of the United States as an Olympian, means he never forgets the power and responsibility that the U.S. government has as it relates to Native Americans.

As Mills says, “our young people … are going to be our warriors in the battles of the 21st century. Our battles will no longer be fought out on the plains of the Dakotas. The battles are going to be fought … with our intellect, and they’re going to be fought in the court systems of America.

“Not against the United States of America, but by educating our congressional people [on Native American treaty rights] … and fighting for the implementation of those treaty rights. [And that will] help empower Native American young people to help make America a more beautiful place.”

Through the Dreamstarter project, Mills is moving forward the process of empowerment.

This past year, while visiting a tribe in North Dakota, Mills was given a second Indian name, one that translates as, “He Whose Footsteps We Can

AP Photo/David ZalubowskiGiving back to Native American people is a fulfilling, ongoing process for Billy Mills.

AP Photo/David Zalubowski
Giving back to Native American people is a fulfilling, ongoing process for Billy Mills.

Hear, But We Cannot See Him.” Like his original Indian name, this one has two meanings.

The first references the race where Mills dreamed of victory — 50 years ago, Billy Mills’ footsteps, so fast you could barely see him, ignited a nation, so fast you could barely see him. The second is that Mills’ footsteps, the impression he leaves behind, will last long after his life is over.

What began as a journey to heal a broken soul by chasing an Olympic dream has become a lasting legacy that enables others to join the pursuit of dreams and goals.

Oregon police seize Native American relics headed for black market

By Courtney Sherwood, Reuters

(Reuters) – Oregon State Police have seized dozens of Native American artifacts, some more than 5,000 years old, that were collected illegally and likely bound for the black market, authorities said on Tuesday.

Among the items seized from a house in Klamath Falls were articles used during Indian funeral ceremonies and other items of cultural significance, Oregon State Police Sergeant Randall Hand said. No human remains were discovered.

A prolonged drought has dried up parts of a regional watershed in the Klamath Basin in southern Oregon and Northern California, exposing archaeological areas normally concealed by water, Hand said.

“These were tribal artifacts, and we believe that most of those that we’ve collected were from 200 years to 5,000 years old, or older,” he said.

Hand said members of Oregon’s Klamath Tribes had helped in a seven-month investigation into the archaeological disappearances from public lands.

Police said dozens of artifacts were reclaimed from the house, but did not provide an exact count.

Officials with the Klamath County District Attorney’s office said they could not comment on the case or any pending charges.

Oregon law requires that anyone removing archaeological objects from public or private lands obtain permits, state police said.

Some researchers have complied with those requirements during the recent drought to gain greater understanding of an area that has been reshaped by dams and artificial reservoirs.

The U.S. Bureau of Reclamation, for example, last fall oversaw excavations at the former site of Klamath Junction, a tiny community intentionally submerged by an irrigation project in the 1960s. As water levels have fallen, building foundations and scattered debris have emerged on a muddy plain that is normally under water.

(Editing by Cynthia Johnston and Doina Chiacu)

DOE To Help Tribes Advance Renewable Energy Projects

By NAW staff,  North American WindPower

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) says it will continue to provide assistance to tribal governments to accelerate renewable energy deployment through its Strategic Technical Assistance Response Team (START) program.

The DOE’s Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs and experts from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory will provide technical assistance for tribal clean energy development by supporting community- and commercial-scale renewable energy projects across the country. Since its December 2011 launch, the START Program has helped 21 tribal communities advance their renewable energy technology and infrastructure projects – from solar and wind to biofuels and energy efficiency.

START will assist tribal project team and tribal legal/finance specialists with reaching a late-stage development decision point or milestone to further a project toward development. Eligible applicants for this opportunity include Indian tribes, Alaska Native regional corporations and formally organized tribal energy resource development organizations. Applicants designated as White House Climate Action Champions will also benefit from the assistance of the START Program and be given preferential consideration.

Applications are due to the DOE’s Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs by May 1. Up to five projects will be selected by late June 2015. Technical assistance will be provided from July of this year through August 2016, notes the DOE.

In addition to this opportunity, the DOE launched the third round of the Alaska START Program in December to assist Alaska Native villages and federally recognized Alaska Native governments with accelerating clean energy projects.

Applications are currently being reviewed, and selected projects will be announced in April.

New Mexico lawmakers to take testimony on proposed gambling compacts for tribal casinos

By The Associated Press

ALBUQUERQUE, New Mexico — New Mexico lawmakers are facing a hard deadline as agreements that allow a handful of American Indian tribes to operate casinos approach their expiration date.

Gov. Susana Martinez’s office has spent the last three years working with tribes to craft a new gambling compact that supporters say would bring stability to New Mexico’s gaming industry, protect jobs and increase revenues to the state.

However, some lawmakers say New Mexico is veering off course.

Senate Finance Chairman John Arthur Smith suggests the state has deviated from its initial plan nearly two decades ago of trying to strike a balance among horse racing tracks, American Indian communities seeking economic development and the state lottery.

Tribes and the public will have a chance Saturday to testify on the proposed compact before the Legislature’s compact committee.

TPD rolls out new fleet

A 2014 Ford SUV will replace the Tulalip Police Department's older Dodge Charger patrol vehicles. (Tulalip News/ Brandi N. Montreuil)

A 2014 Ford SUV will replace the Tulalip Police Department’s older Dodge Charger patrol vehicles. (Tulalip News/ Brandi N. Montreuil)

By Brandi N. Montreuil, Tulalip News

TULALIP – You may have noticed that the Tulalip Police Department vehicles look a little different lately, in fact, it’s because they are. The department has recently added 15 new patrol vehicles. The new patrol vehicles were purchased using the 2013 COPS grant from the U.S. Department of Justice.

Nearly $800,000 was awarded to TPD to replace 15 patrol vehicles with no cost match required by the Tribe. The new vehicles will replace older patrol cars that have accumulated over 100,000 miles and considered a safety hazard for the officer and the community, in addition to being a burden on the department’s budget.

According to TPD, the department’s officers “respond to an average of 22,000 calls for service each year, make thousands of traffic stops and

Tulalip Police Department new patrol vehicles will feature new graphics on the back with the department's slogan. (Tulalip News/ Brandi N. Montreuil)

Tulalip Police Department new patrol vehicles will feature new graphics on the back with the department’s slogan. (Tulalip News/ Brandi N. Montreuil)

average over 6,600 tribal housing checks per year.” Which according to the department has put a lot of wear and tear on the older patrol cars.

The new 2014 Ford SUVs have been outfitted according to the department’s needs and are replacing the older Dodge Charger models the department has been using. Updated graphics have also been added to the new patrol vehicles. The department’s new slogan, Trust Pride Dedication is featured on the back of each patrol car.

“These vehicles are literally the police officers’ office. Every thing they need is in the vehicle. Having an aging fleet can cause the cost to maintain them skyrocket. The cost to maintain these vehicles comes out of the department’s budget. Having this new fleet ensures the community reliability and safety. New vehicles are safe for the officers and the community,” said Carlos Echevarria, Tulalip Chief of Police.

 

Brandi N. Montreuil: 360-913-5402; bmontreuil@tulalipnews.com