Bridging community and education

Dr. Berg welcomes students back to school during tour of the Tulalip Boys and Girls Club

By Andrew Gobin, Tulalip News

TULALIP – “Our club!” the children exclaimed as they greeted Dr. Becky Berg, Superintendent of the Marysville School District. Dr. Berg’s visit to the club was part of a back to school kick off on Tuesday, August 19.

Marysville School District Superintendent Dr. Becky Berg receives a drum as thanks for her visit to the Tulalip Boys and Girls Club. Lois Henry shared a story as well.

Marysville School District Superintendent Dr. Becky Berg receives a drum as thanks for her visit to the Tulalip Boys and Girls Club. Lois Henry shared a story as well. Photo/ Andrew Gobin, Tulalip News

“We have been working all summer to make sure our schools are ready for you all,” Dr. Berg said. “We are all very excited to see you back at school in two weeks.”

Dr. Berg’s tour of the club is part of an effort to create an afterschool community that encourages educational success. Statistics show that students who attend Boys and Girls Clubs perform better in all areas of learning.

“These numbers from the Arlington School District compare Boys and Girls Club kids and kids that don’t come to the club,” said Bill Tsoukalas, Executive Director of the Boys and Girls Clubs of Snohomish County. “At fourth, fifth, and sixth grade, you see a constant trend across reading, math and science where club kids score much higher.”

Dr. Becky Berg looking at student data from the Arlington School District with Snohomish County Boys and Girls Clubs Executive Director, Bill Tsoukalas. The data shows that Boys and Girls Club kids consistently perform much higher that non-club kids.

Dr. Becky Berg looking at student data from the Arlington School District with Snohomish County Boys and Girls Clubs Executive Director, Bill Tsoukalas. The data shows that Boys and Girls Club kids consistently perform much higher that non-club kids. Photo/ Andrew Gobin, Tulalip News

Excited by the data from Arlington, Dr. Berg intends to look at similar demographics for Tulalip students in Marysville schools to see if there is a similar trend. Tsoukalas and Tulalip Boys and Girls Club Director, Chuck Thacker, believe there is.

Thacker said, “We see so much improvement in our kids. We bring them into a different environment, providing support for the kids.”

“This is their club,” he continued, “you heard them say it. You will notice that the walls are not drawn on and marked up, trash is picked up. They take pride in their club, and that’s what makes it successful.”

That way of thinking was instilled in Boys and Girls Club kids more than seven years ago by Don “Penoke” Hatch, long time supporter for the Boys and Girls Clubs of Snohomish County.

“Kids come here to have fun and to be in a safe place afterschool. But we also want them to learn while they’re here,” Tsoukalas added.

The tour moved into the computer lab as Dr. Berg was shown all of the resources available to children at the club. The newly-renovated lab is complete with brand new computers, two main monitors, and a smart-screen for interactive teaching.

“This is all state of the art. We want to be up and ready, fully functional for the open house in a few weeks,” Tsoukalas proudly explained. “We’ve invited both of our senators, Cantwell being a huge proponent of programs like ours.”

Hatch said, “I think the tribe ought to be proud of what they’ve got here, what they’re doing here for our kids.”

Dr. Berg was thanked for her visit to the Tulalip Boys and Girls Club, and was presented with a special gift, a traditional hand drum with original artwork by Heritage High School senior Ayrik Miranda, who is employed with the club through the summer.

 

Children celebrated as they start school

Tulalip Early Head Start students move on to preschool

Families gathered at the Tulalip Amphitheater August 12  to celebrate the children of the Tulalip Early Head Start program that will be starting preschool this fall.Photo: Andrew Gobin/Tulalip News

Families gathered at the Tulalip Amphitheatre August 12 to celebrate the children of the Tulalip Early Head Start program that will be starting preschool this fall.
Photo: Andrew Gobin/Tulalip News

By Andrew Gobin, Tulalip News

TULALIP – The Parent Committee of the Tulalip Early head Start program gathered with staff and students Tuesday, August 12, at the Tulalip Amphitheatre to celebrate their children as they transition into preschool, beginning their academic careers.

“I think it’s a great event where we can honor our children. The parents and staff worked together to make this event happen,” said Alicia Horne, who chairs the EHS parent committee.

The program curriculum is focused on developing basic skills through sensory learning. As children advance in academia, these first few years are crucial in determining how a child will perform in school. The EHS staff are committed to preparing these young children to excel in school.

As much as the event is for students, parents take the time to honor the staff for the work that they do with the tribal children.

Tulalip Councilwoman Marie Zackuse said, “Thank you for setting that foundation for our kids, helping them towards success in their education.”

“I think it’s a great way to honor the teachers for what they do for our children,” said Felicia Holland, one of the parents on the committee.

Children enter the EHS program as early as two, and move through three levels of the program. When they do move on, they are entering the beginnings of public school. Many of the students will advance to the Tulalip Montessori or Tulalip ECEAP.

 Jordan and Alex Bontempo. Jordan, who already moved up to the Tulalip Montessori, is a proud big brother as Alex begins school.Photo: Andrew Gobin/Tulalip News

Jordan and Alex Bontempo. Jordan, who already moved up to the Tulalip Montessori, is a proud big brother as Alex begins school.
Photo: Andrew Gobin/Tulalip News

The event is funded solely through fund raising. In addition to honoring the staff and advancing students, there was an art auction of student work in an effort to continue fundraising for other EHS events. Two walls featured traditional hand drums with unique designs that the parents and students worked on together.

 

Entrepreneurs as future leaders

Junior Achievement teaches business goals

Adiya Jones, Ethan Horne, and Mikaylee Pablo present their design concept to their peers.Andrew Gobin/Tulalip News

Adiya Jones, Ethan Horne, and Mikaylee Pablo present their design concept to their peers.
Andrew Gobin/Tulalip News

By Andrew Gobin

August 4 through August 8, Tulalip students involved in the summer youth program attended the Junior Achievement camp. Each year Junior Achievement (JA) teaches students ways to successfully manage finances. This year, the camp focus was on the importance of setting business goals and entrepreneurship.

The first exercise was in developing an idea for a youth center, then designing it.

“The kids have the freedom of imagination,” said Lee Veal, one of the community educators hired by JA. “They get to design a teen center with what they would like to have. There are no limits, the only stipulations were that their designs had to include bathrooms and a study room.”

In groups of two to three, students designed unique concepts including multi-level facilities with a wide array of amenities including retail space, computer labs, game rooms, recording studios, and quiet areas for relaxation and meditation. All of the plans included a fitness area complete with a lap-pool, spa, and sauna.

With the freedom to plan without limitations students were very creative with their design concepts, paying close attention to details like design scale, layout, doors, and building flow. Drew Hatch went so far as to layout the bathroom fixtures, right down to the urinals.

“I’ve done this with a lot of students for a lot of years, but this is the first time I’ve seen this,” said JA Regional Director, Gary Hauff, about the attention to detail in the layout of the restrooms in Hatch’s design.

Drew Hatch and Gary Hauff discuss the details of his design concept.Andrew Gobin/Tulalip News

Drew Hatch and Gary Hauff discuss the details of his design concept.
Andrew Gobin/Tulalip News

The unique designs are extravagant, but not so much that they are unrealistic.

Student Diana Aguilar said about her project, “It’d be cool to see the design built.”

While that would be a dream, the purpose for the exercise was to have students create a concept, then learn how to make that concept a reality.

Hauff said, “This year we are focusing on entrepreneurship. Last year, and the years previous, the camp was focused on investment and personal finance management, which can get boring crunching numbers all day. This year we wanted to do something a little more hands on, and get a little more participation.”

“We learned to work together better, and better planning for projects,” said Aguilar.

The goal of the camp is to show students how to make their ideas into a profitable reality. With creativity and planning, anything is possible. Now that their designs are finished, students will use them as business models to learn about start up costs and business planning. The youth are our future, both for our culture and our economic prosperity. With entrepreneurs as our future leaders our economic successes are sure to continue.

 

Andrew Gobin is a staff reporter with the Tulalip News See-Yaht-Sub, a publication of the Tulalip Tribes Communications Department.
Email: agobin@tulalipnews.com
Phone: (360) 716.4188

Native Hawaiians insulted by proposed recognition

More than 100 years after illegally overthrowing the Hawaiian Monarchy, DOI seeks to restore government-to-government relations with the Kingdom of Hawaii

By Andrew Gobin, Tulalip News

On Friday, August 1, the United States Department of the Interior held a consultation at the Tulalip Resort Casino to discuss whether or not they should restore government-to-government relations with the Kingdom of Hawaii, and what that might look like. The meeting is one of five consultations with tribal leaders, following 15 public meetings in Hawaii. Approximately 30 people attended the meeting, and of the Native Hawaiians in attendance, none of them support the proposed recognition of the Kingdom of Hawaii.

“Recognition is a slap in the face to Hawaiian people. I say no to recognition,” said Gabriel Makanani  Reyes-Gomez, a Lahaina native now living in Seattle.

That sentiment seems to be the popular opinion of Native Hawaiians. The meetings in Hawaii were all ill received as well, rejecting what the DOI is proposing.

The suggested method of restoration of the government-to-government relations would follow the model most tribes operate under, which is a recognized sovereignty that allows for tribes to deal with the federal government on a nation to nation basis, holding them to their treaty obligations. For tribes who entered into treaties with the United States, that works. But for the Kingdom of Hawaii, there never was a treaty.

In 1898 the Hawaiian Islands were unlawfully annexed by the United States. Through a serious of more than 150 congressional acts and executive orders between then and the time Hawaii was granted statehood in 1959, the United States began asserting authority in the territory. Those acts also assumed a trust relationship with the Native Hawaiians. Unlike tribes, there is no treaty with the Hawaiians in which the federal government is obliged to trust responsibility. Some Native Hawaiians are upset that the tribes are even being consulted in this matter.

Hawaiian elder Herb Kai said, “It is our issue. With respect to the 200 plus U.S. tribes, it is not your issue, it is ours.”

The trust obligation to Hawaiians only exists in the way the United States has defined it.

“When I met with members of the Native Hawaiian community last year during my visit to the state, I learned first-hand about Hawaii’s unique history and the importance of the special trust relationship that exists between the Federal government and the Native Hawaiian community,” said Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell. “Through this step, the Department is responding to requests from not only the Native Hawaiian community but also state and local leaders and interested parties who recognize that we need to begin a conversation of diverse voices to help determine the best path forward for honoring the trust relationship that Congress has created specifically to benefit Native Hawaiians.”

The issue, as viewed by the Native Hawaiian community, is not about a trust relationship, it is about reconciling the unlawful annexation of their country. Is recognition the way to do that? In 1993, Public Law 103-150, which is the formal apology for the act of war 100 years prior, acknowledged the coup as an interruption of Hawaiian self-determination. Based on the trust relationship built since that time, the apology also called for action by the United States in restoring Hawaiian self-determination. The proposed answer is recognition, though the tribal model shows that the United States maintains too much control. With no treaty, they then have the power to reinterpret that relationship at will.

Native Hawaiian Brad Slavey said, “I do not want the United States to dictate our self-determination. I do not want their assistance in defining how we govern ourselves.”

In 1893, the provisional government of Hawaii, backed by the United States military, overthrew the monarchy of the Kingdom of Hawaii. Up to that time, the Kingdom of Hawaii was an independent nation state with several constitution drafts. At the time of the last accepted draft in 1864, the Kingdom of Hawaii had longstanding international trade relations with England and the United States, mainly, as well as others. Under duress of gunpoint, the last queen, Liliuokolani, surrendered her authority to the provisional government. This illegal action was acknowledge by President Cleveland as an atrocity.

“The military occupation of Honolulu by the United States on the day mentioned was wholly without justification, either as an occupation by consent or as an occupation necessitated by dangers threatening American life and property,” reads Cleveland’s official report to the Committee of Foreign Relations. “It must be accounted for in some other way and on some other ground, and its real motive and purpose are neither obscure nor far to seek.”

In the surrender of her authority, Queen Liliuokalani wrote, “Now to avoid any collision of armed forces, and perhaps the loss of life, I do this under protest and impelled by said force yield my authority until such time as the Government of the United States shall, upon facts being presented to it, undo the action of its representatives and reinstate me in the authority which I claim as the Constitutional Sovereign of the Hawaiian Islands.”

Cleveland responded in kind, “Believing, therefore, that the United States could not, under the circumstances disclosed, annex the islands without justly incurring the imputation of acquiring them by unjustifiable methods, I shall not again submit the treaty of annexation to the Senate for its consideration.”

After Cleveland’s departure from office, the annexation was passed through Congress under the McKinley administration.

What then is the solution? Ideally, resolution would mean that the United States would have to relinquish its claim to the State of Hawaii, and restore the monarchy, which is unlikely. The United States offers recognition of Hawaiian sovereignty to strengthen the promises that they have made through numerous congressional acts. There is still a movement in Hawaii, however, that holds to the belief that as a sovereign, the Kingdom of Hawaii has the right to seek aid from other sovereigns, or the United Nations.

“There does need to be a dialogue,” added Slavey, “but are we in a dialogue with the right people?”

The taking of Hawaii for the United States was unjust, essentially an act of war on another nation. Now, more than 100 years, deciding how to undo that damage to Native Hawaiians will require concessions on both sides which no one wants to make.

“I do want the Kingdom of Hawaii acknowledged, but at what cost,” added Slavey.

 

Andrew Gobin is a staff reporter with the Tulalip News See-Yaht-Sub, a publication of the Tulalip Tribes Communications Department.
Email: agobin@tulalipnews.com
Phone: (360) 716.4188

Record attendance at annual health fair

Wait lines for health screens and denials at the blood bus

 

Amanda Shelton explores the differences between traditional tobacco use and cigarettes.Photo: Andrew Gobin

Amanda Shelton explores the differences between traditional tobacco use and cigarettes.
Photo: Andrew Gobin/Tulalip News

By Andrew Gobin, Tulalip News

The Tulalip Karen I. Fryberg Health Clinic hosted their annual health fair July 28, with participants lining up at health screening stations, a fair first in 31 years,.

“I think this is the biggest health fair that we’ve ever had, there have been lines all day,” said Jennie Fryberg, front desk supervisor at the clinic. “More than 280 participants signed in, 200 of which were here before lunch.”

Every year, the clinic holds a blood drive simultaneously with the health fair. This year, more than 20 people had scheduled donor times with the Puget Sound Blood Center’s Blood Bus. Walk-ins are always welcomed at the Blood Bus, but there were so many walk-in donors this year, in addition to those with scheduled times, that for the first time at Tulalip, donors were being turned away due to lack of space. Of the 33 people who tried to give blood, 29 were able to.

Puget Sound Blood Centers Blood BusPhoto: Andrew Gobin/Tulalip News

Puget Sound Blood Centers Blood Bus
Photo: Andrew Gobin/Tulalip News

With a record 35 booths, 8 screening stations, and a fun run, there seemed to be more interest in this year’s health fair than in previous years.

“People were here at 8:30 a.m. waiting for booths to open,” said Sonia Sohappy, a bowen therapist for the clinic’s complimentary medicine program.

The day started out busy, and really stayed comfortably crowded throughout the day. People stopped at screening stations, checking blood sugar, vision, blood pressure, tuberculosis, hepatitis, and more.

The annual health fair is one of many open house events at the Tulalip Karen I. Fryberg Clinic throughout the year. Watch for event announcements in the See-Yaht-Sub, on the Tulalip News Facebook page, or contact the clinic by phone at (360) 716-4511 for more information.

Calendula harvested from the Tulalip Health Clinic's Diabetes garden.Photo: Andrew Gobin/Tulalip News

Calendula harvested from the Tulalip Health Clinic’s Diabetes garden.
Photo: Andrew Gobin/Tulalip News

Rainbow Radishes harvested from the Tulalip Health Clinic's Diabetes garden.Photo: Andrew Gobin/Tulalip News

Rainbow Radishes harvested from the Tulalip Health Clinic’s Diabetes garden.
Photo: Andrew Gobin/Tulalip News

Andrew Gobin is a staff reporter with the Tulalip News See-Yaht-Sub, a publication of the Tulalip Tribes Communications Department.
Email: agobin@tulalipnews.com
Phone: (360) 716.4188

 

 

Black and Blue, the Kangen craze

Water that truly unlocks health, or the latest cure all snake oil?

 

Signature Enagic water jugs, the mark of a Kangen user.Photo, Andrew Gobin

Signature Enagic water jugs, the mark of a Kangen user.
Photo, Andrew Gobin/Tulalip News

By Andrew Gobin, Tulalip News

You may have seen the blue and black Enagic water jugs people are packing around these days. You’ve probably heard about Kangen water, and if you yourself are not a Kangen user, you’ve probably wondered what exactly is so special about this water from all other filtered waters. The answer to which often leaves people with many more questions about how it all works, or why Kangen is a better choice. Here you will get an in-depth look at this latest health fad.

Many Kangen users tout this water as the new miracle in naturopathic health. Easily absorbed by the body, this water is supposed to keep you hydrated, in addition to being an antioxidant.

Tulalip tribal member Caleb Woods, a Kangen user, said, “I feel more energized, and toxins flush out of my body faster. I notice I sweat easier, and my acne has been clearing up.”

The effects Woods noted are typical of any well hydrated person, so what makes Kangen different? The answer is not so simple.

What is Kangen water exactly? In a nutshell, it is basic, or alkaline. The machine that filters and produces the water is actually a medical machine developed by a Japanese manufacturer 40 years ago. According to Kangen rep, Shawn Brown, water from the city tap or well goes into the machine, is filtered, and then restructured using electrolysis; a process of running an electric current through the water. Water molecules, which are naturally polarized, cluster in a naturally hexagonal structure, similar to a honeycomb. The restructuring of water arranges the molecules into micro clusters of five to seven molecules, instead of the typical 15. That process also ionizes the water, which makes it basic by creating a negative hydroxyl molecule (HO) and a positive hydrogen ion (H+), or cation. Micro clusters of hydroxyl molecules are more easily absorbed in the body.

The separation of ions of Kangen water raises the pH, which is a measure of the power, or concentration, of hydrogen ions in any compound. The pH scale runs 1-14, 7 being neutral. As the concentration of hydrogen ions increases, the pH number decreases. Acids have low pH, and bases have high pH. Water typically measures at 7. According to the Snohomish County Health District, city water measures at 7.5 because of the lye added to the water to prevent rusting pipes, both hazardous to health in and of themselves. Kangen water is very basic when it’s ionized, measuring between 8.5 and 11, though agitating the water will return it to a neutral state. Also, if not consumed immediately, the natural interaction between the cations (H+) and hydroxyl (OH) molecules will return the Kangen water to natural water (H2O).

What is the need for alkaline Kangen water?

Brown said, “Cities put a lot of chemicals in the water to kill bacteria, or to make the water healthy. Essentially, that is dead water. Kangen water is not only filtered, but it has free hydrogen ions, which is a natural antioxidant.”

The hydrogen cations are regulators that catalyze chemical reactions in the body’s systems, drawing out free oxygen molecules, or oxidants. In that way, the water is alive, interacting with the body as you drink it. The abundant of cations join with oxidants, neutralizing them. But Kangen water, as a basic solution, disrupts the body’s cells from doing this naturally by inhibiting the mitochondrial processes. The mitochondria of a cell, which govern metabolism in cells and in turn the body, require oxidants in order to metabolize proteins. Hydroxyl molecules join with free radicals making hyperperoxide in the body, allowing the free cations to seek out oxygen and oxidants to join with. That essentially leads to the depletion of oxygen creating a chemical imbalance in the body and a disruption of natural processes at a cellular level. This leads to premature cell death. The body works to regulate itself, and these processes occur naturally without Kangen water.

“The body is naturally alkaline, the blood is alkaline. If the body is acidic, you’re probably sick,” said Brown.

That is true, though not entirely accurate. The ideal pH of blood is between 7.3 and 7.4. So yes, it is alkaline, but only slightly. The body’s many systems help to regulate the pH of the body, each producing acids and bases, specific to each system. While the body is naturally alkaline by design, it is regulated through the secretion of acids produced in the body. Acids, like lactic and stomach acids, are designed to breakdown sugars and proteins, while bases, various hormones, are designed to specifically regulate systems in the body, many of which produce acids. Systems in the body use water to make hydroxyl and hydrogen cations for the purpose of metabolizing compounds and cleaning the body. It is a delicate balance that can have serious health implications when altered.

While it is a delicate balance, deviation of pH levels, even slightly, are signs of serious illness in the body. To do this intentionally has many health implications. For example, deviations in body chemistry of any degree affect metabolic systems drastically. A shock of pH imbalance due to raising the alkalinity of your body could lead to alkalosis. Mild alkalosis causes muscle spasms and cramps. Severe alkalosis can lead to tetanus or cardiac arrest. Acidosis, in contrast, causes mild nausea, vomiting, convulsions, and apnea.

Why does it matter, you may wonder? First of all, Kangen water will be available at all youth summer programs, and at the summer school. Parents should be aware that this is being served to your children. For people with strict dietary needs, there are serious health risks associated with altering body chemistry. That’s not saying Kangen is bad, or shouldn’t be used, but parents should be aware of what their children are exposed to. If people, including children, are on medications, they need to know how Kangen water affects them. The Kangen website and virtual demonstration specifically warn that users should not take medications with the alkaline Kangen water, and should refrain from drinking Kangen for an additional two hours afterward.

Second, there has been a large push that this is the answer to a healthier membership. There is a community Kangen machine available to the public for an hour, mornings and afternoons, at the Don Hatch Jr. Youth Center. Some members have machines in their homes. Kangen can only be acquired through the use of these machines, not sold in stores anywhere. These machines run between $2500 and $4000, and can be acquired through a regional Kangen representative. While the benefits of Kangen may outweigh the risks, the truth is, you don’t need Kangen water to be healthy. Similar results can be achieved through choosing organic foods and eliminating processed foods as much as possible, and expanding your diet to include foods that have specific benefits for healthy function of the body’s systems.

There is no magic cure all to ailments. While you can’t drink your way to health, it is beneficial to drink filtered water. To  date, however, there is no documented medical suggestion that says basic water is healthier than natural water, in fact the opposite. Whatever water you choose to drink, the importance is to stay hydrated.

More info on Kangen water available online at www.kangenkarma.com. See the demonstration at www.kangendemo.com.

 

Andrew Gobin is a staff reporter with the Tulalip News See-Yaht-Sub, a publication of the Tulalip Tribes Communications Department.
Email: agobin@tulalipnews.com
Phone: (360) 716.4188

NEAR LA CONNER: Swinomish tribe, State Parks open preserve

The Bellingham Herald

Staff report: June 29, 2014

The Kukutali Preserve is the first to be jointly managed by an Indian tribe, the Swinomish Indian Tribal Community, and another agency, in this case Washington State Parks. The preserve is located near La Conner.Photo: WASHINGTON STATE PARKS

The Kukutali Preserve is the first to be jointly managed by an Indian tribe, the Swinomish Indian Tribal Community, and another agency, in this case Washington State Parks. The preserve is located near La Conner.
Photo: WASHINGTON STATE PARKS

The Kukutali Preserve in Similk Bay near La Conner has opened through a partnership between Washington State Parks and the Swinomish Indian Tribal Community.

The preserve opened to the public during a ceremony June 16.

State and tribal officials said the preserve is believed to be the first park in the United States to be co-owned and co-managed by a tribe and another government, such as a state. Management of the preserve will focus on conservation and research, public education and limited recreational use, according to a State Parks news release.

“It’s a great day to be making history,” Swinomish tribal Chairman Brian Cladoosby said during his keynote address at the opening ceremony.

“It’s going to be great for visitors to witness and see the beauty that we’ve seen here forever,” Cladoosby said in the release. “This wouldn’t have been possible without a lot of people coming together to make sure this dream became a reality.”

Located entirely within the Swinomish Reservation, the preserve includes 84 upland acres on Kiket Island and Flagstaff Point and 9 upland acres on Fidalgo Island. It includes more than 2 miles of nearly intact shoreline, with native eelgrass beds, multiple fish species and shellfish.

Numerous endangered or threatened species make their home in the preserve’s diverse habitats, which include old-growth trees.

Among the preserve’s unique features is a rare type of environment called a “rocky bald,” according to State Park officials. Found on Flagstaff Point, west of Kiket Island, this area has fragile, thin soil that hosts a unique community of native plants and nesting waterfowl. To protect that ecosystem, access to Flagstaff Point is prohibited.

The preserve also contains cultural resources important to the Swinomish tribe.

Right now, there are 2 miles of walking trails with plans to add an ADA-accessible boardwalk, another trail and amenities such as a picnic shelter, picnic sites, interpretive information and two vault restrooms, according to the release.

The preserve is open daily for day use only, from dawn to dusk. Vehicles will be limited to the parking lot, and the remainder of the site is accessible only by foot. The parking lot is at the northwest corner of Snee-Oosh and Kiket Island roads, west of La Conner. A Discover Pass is required to park at the preserve

State Parks, with the help of the Trust for Public Land, acquired the upland portion of the property in June 2010 after it had been owned privately for almost 100 years.

Learn more

More information and background on the Kukutali Preserve management and master plan available at parks.wa.gov/299/Kukutali-Preserve.

 

Class III compact for Swinomish Tribe lowers legal age to 18

WEDNESDAY, JULY 23, 2014

The Swinomish Casino & Lodge in Anacortes, Washington. Photo from Google+

The Swinomish Casino & Lodge in Anacortes, Washington. Photo from Google+

The Bureau of Indian Affairs has approved an amendment to the Class III gaming compact for the Swinomish Tribe of Washington.

 

The amendment lowers the gambling age at the Swinomish Casino & Lodge. Patrons between 18 and 20 will now be able to play Class III games at the facility.

 

“This proposed amendment modernizes the compact by clarifying that patrons between 18 and 20 years of age may participate in gambling activities so long as they do not purchase or consume alcohol on the premises,” the Washington State Gambling Commission said in a press release earlier this year. “The amendment language is consistent with several other tribes’ gaming compacts.

 

A notice of the approval was published in today’s issue of the Federal Register.

 

Federal Register Notice:
Indian Gaming (July 23, 2014)

Obama Administration Announces $2.5 Million for Tribes to Take Over Schools

By Lesli A. Maxwell on July 24, 2014 11:41 AM

Education Week

Horses graze outside the Loneman School, a Bureau of Indian Education school operated by a locally-elected school board on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota.--Swikar Patel/Education Week

The Obama administration is moving ahead with its plans to improve the federally funded schools that serve tens of thousands of American Indian students with an announcement of $2.5 million in grants to entice tribes to take more control over educating their children.

U.S. Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell—whose agency is responsible for the 47,000 students who are enrolled in Bureau of Indian Education schools—announced the competitive grants.

Last month,President Barack Obama rolled out his vision for a new and improved BIE, a long-troubled agency that directly operates 57 schools for Native American students and oversees 126 others run under contract by tribes. That”Blueprint for Reform” lays out steps to reorient the BIE from an agency that operates schools from Washington to a “school improvement organization” that provides resources and support services to schools that are controlled by tribes.

The competitive grants are the first concrete step in that direction.

Ranging from $100,000 to $200,000 per fiscal year, the grants are meant to assist federally recognized tribes that want to assume control over BIE schools that operate on their reservations. Interior Department officials said the grant funds will help tribes develop school reform plans that are tied to goals for improving academic achievement and operational efficiencies.

Tribal education departments that have three or more Bureau of Indian Education schools on their reservations are eligible for the grants. The administration’s overall plan to improve BIE faces strong skepticism in some parts of Indian Country, where distrust toward the agency runs deep among tribal leaders and educators.

Tribes won’t have long to put their proposals together. The deadline for the first grant cycle is Sept. 14.

Revisit Education Week‘s takeout on the state of Indian education for a deeper look at why schools that serve Native American children are among the lowest-performing.

Gathering foods, spiritual medicine

Rediscovery Program brings people together to learn and share in the harvest and use of traditional foods

 

Inez Bill-Gobin slices clam strips to be smoked.Photo: Andrew Gobin/Tulalip News

Inez Bill-Gobin slices clam strips to be smoked.
Photo: Andrew Gobin/Tulalip News

By Andrew Gobin, photos by Andrew Gobin, Niki Cleary, and Theresa Sheldon

The Rediscovery Program at the Hibulb Cultural Center and Natural History Preserve has been more busy than usual over the last few weeks, gathering and processing traditional foods. Program staff have been planning harvesting events, showing groups of Tulalip community members how to what can be gathered where, when, and how.

Program Coordinator Inez Bill-Gobin said, “Our native foods feed not only our bodies, but our spirits too. I think we are really rich in our culture when we are able to harvest and use our native foods.”

On Monday, June 30, Rediscovery Program staff took a group of Tulalip community members to gather wild blackberries, elderberries, and native teas. A bountiful harvest yielding much more than foods, as many teachings are shared.

Bill said, “We were gathering wild blackberry. A lot of people don’t know that these small berries are indigenous berries. Not like the Himalayan Blackberry you see, which is invasive.”

These events and others like them are in preparations for a cultural workshop to take place in early August of this year. Each excursion is an opportunity to learn about the many uses of traditional foods. For example, the blackberry vines offer more than berries, the leaves can be made into tea. While they gathered no blackberry leaves, the group did harvest horsetail and fireweed to be dried for tea. The people gathering foods and materials with the Rediscovery Program will become teachers themselves, as the community draws together for four or five days of gathering traditional foods, preparing them, enjoying them, and learning and remembering the traditional ways of our people.

“Everyone has a gift. Everyone has something to offer. These teachings are our teachings, and they are for everyone. Even the new ones have a gift. I was teasing Niki that we know what her gift is, she picked the most berries of all of us,” said Bill about Niki Cleary, who harvest blackberries with the June 30 group.

On Tuesday, July 1, people joined the Rediscovery staff at the Hibulb Cultural Center to process the berries, canning them into preserves for later cultural activities.

After drying for a few days, the horsetail and fireweed teas were ready to be processed and packed away. On Thursday, July 3, Bill and her protégé Virginia Jones taught Courtney Sheldon and Darkfeather Ancheta how to make the horsetail and fireweed teas, specifically the base measurements and cook time.

About six weeks ago, the Rediscovery Program harvested clams and cockles, freezing them. Tuesday, July 8, rediscovery, youth services, and cultural staff processed the clams along with a deer, to be smoked, using their new smokehouse for the first time.

Inez Bill-Gobin, Donald Jones, and others peel smoked deer off of the racks after they smoked for a few hours.Photo: Andrew Gobin/Tulalip News

Inez Bill-Gobin, Donald Jones, and others peel smoked deer off of the racks after they smoked for a few hours.
Photo: Andrew Gobin/Tulalip News

The dates for the harvest celebration in August are yet to be determined. Look for updates here in the see-yaht-sub, on Tulalip News website, or contact events coordinator Robert Watson by phone at (360) 716-4194, or by email at rwatson@tulaliptribes-nsn.gov for more information.

 

Andrew Gobin is a staff reporter with the Tulalip News See-Yaht-Sub, a publication of the Tulalip Tribes Communications Department.
Email: agobin@tulalipnews.com
Phone: (360) 716.4188