Women’s health spotlighted at health fair

Participants were able to ask questions from professionals and have health screens performed on Friday, May 8, 2015, at the Tulalip Karen I. Fryberg Health Clinic. Popular booths included an alternative medicine booth featuring essential oils, a kidney health booth and the diabetes booth. (Tulalip News/ Brandi N. Montreuil)

Participants were able to ask questions from professionals and have health screens performed on Friday, May 8, 2015, at the Tulalip Karen I. Fryberg Health Clinic. Popular booths included an alternative medicine booth featuring essential oils, a kidney health booth and the diabetes booth. (Tulalip News/ Brandi N. Montreuil)

By Brandi N. Montreuil, Tulalip News

TULALIP – For the first time in three years women packed into the Tulalip Karen I. Fryberg Health Clinic to attend a health fair tailored specifically to their health needs. On Friday, May 8 the lobby at the clinic was transformed into a woman-only zone that featured over 20 informational booths on women’s health from A to Z.

Funded by the Tulalip Stop Smoking Program due to budget constraints, the fair highlighted the forgotten issues of women’s health, such as routine health check-ups, proper footwear and wearing a good supporting bra.

Health fair organizer Jennie Fryberg, said this year’s health fair was meant to draw attention to the things women tend to put off due to work or family responsibilities.

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“The idea was to do something different and have booths that offered information on other forms of health care, such as essential oils and other alternative health care. There is no mammogram bus this year but we have a great booth that has information on breast and cervical health. We have The Bra Shop attending this year and they accept HMA health insurance so you can get a proper fitting and get a good supporting bra,” said Fryberg, whose mother Karen Fryberg started the tradition of health fairs at the clinic 30 years ago.

Deandra Grant, 15, attended the fair in the afternoon and said she learned how important health can be later in life. “I learned don’t do bad stuff to your body and brush your teeth. You have to take care of yourself. The kidney station was my favorite so far and the diabetes booth. The whole fair is informational for me.”

Held in conjunction with Mother’s Day, the clinic organized a special makeover for three ladies chosen by staff following in the tradition of previous health fairs that provided makeovers to cancer patients.

“This year I knew I needed to do something special for three particular women in our community. The Clinic didn’t have funds for the fair so I knew the makeovers would have to be funded in a different way. The Stop Smoking Program kindly donated the funds for the fair and we did fundraising for the makeovers,” Fryberg said.

Health fair makeover recipients Lavinia Philips, Lahneen Fryberg and Nessie Hatch enjoyed a mini shopping spree, manicure and hair styling on Friday, May 8, 2015, as part of the Tulalip Karen I. Fryberg Health Clinic's Women's Health Fair. All three said the makeover was a great surprise. "We didn't expect it and it was great that the three of us could spend a happy time together," said Fryberg. Echoing her sentiments Hatch commented, "A lot of times as moms, we don't take care of ourselves because we put out kids first, so this was great and reminds us that we need to take time for ourselves."  (Tulalip News/ Brandi N. Montreuil)

Health fair makeover recipients Lavinia Philips, Lahneen Fryberg and Nessie Hatch enjoyed a mini shopping spree, manicure and hair styling on Friday, May 8, 2015, as part of the Tulalip Karen I. Fryberg Health Clinic’s Women’s Health Fair. All three said the makeover was a great surprise. “We didn’t expect it and it was great that the three of us could spend a happy time together,” said Fryberg. Echoing her sentiments Hatch commented, “A lot of times as moms, we don’t take care of ourselves because we put out kids first, so this was great and reminds us that we need to take time for ourselves.” (Tulalip News/ Brandi N. Montreuil)

Chosen were Lahneen Fryberg, Lavinia Phillips and Nessie Hatch, all mothers of victims from the October 24 shooting at Marysville-Pilchuck High School.

“I wanted them to have something special before Mother’s Day and show how proud we are as a community of their strength and that we are here to support them,” continued Fryberg.

For more information on women’s health check out the website www.healthywomen.org, or make an appointment to see a physician at the Karen I. Fryberg Health Clinic by calling 360-716-4511.

 

Brandi N. Montreuil: 360-913-5402; bmontreuil@tulalipnews.com

 

Research program helps diabetics lower stress levels

By Brandi N. Montreuil, Tulalip News

HHHM teamTULALIP- Healthy Hearts, Healthy Minds is a research program focusing on Native American cardiovascular disease (CVD) and diabetes patients residing on the Tulalip Reservation, or within 20 miles of the reservation. Their goal is to lower stress levels in patients resulting from CVD and diabetes management.

The program is taught through weekly sessions over a 3-month period, and is individually focused.  Participants are required to have a medical diagnosis of CVD, diabetes, or pre-diabetes. Culturally sensitive curriculum features coping skills and self-care techniques based on diagnosis requirements.

“Research found that Natives have this problem with CVD and diabetes. They are at a really high risk for getting these disorders. The idea is to try to find out what it is that is making them more at risk and to find an intervention,” said June LaMarr, program’s community principle investigator.

While the program does not treat diabetes patients as the Tulalip Diabetes Program offered at the Tulalip Karen I. Fryberg Health Clinic does, the project coordinator Michelle Tiedeman explains collaboration between the two programs ensures all healthcare concerns are addressed in patients.

“Their program focuses on the diabetes portion, we are addressing those symptoms of stress resulting from diabetes self-care management. The idea is we are hoping to lower those levels in order to increase those diabetes self-care behaviors that are needed to maintain glucose levels,” said Tiedeman.

In each session participants can expect help identifying stress triggers and develop tools to reach goals relating to diabetes care. Participants are requested to complete a base-line assessment, which includes a fasting blood draw, brief physical assessment, and a survey questionnaire, before starting their first session.

There is no cost to participate in the program, but participants are provided a small incentive for participating and can earn up to $190 in gift cards and checks.

“We are looking for people who are experiencing some type of stress in managing those diabetes self-care behaviors. We are trying to help them learn ways to feel less overwhelmed by everything they are asked to do, and help them basically fall into a healthy routine with their diabetes,” said Tiedeman. “We don’t want people to think they can’t participate in both diabetes programs, we want ours to be viewed as an additional service. Because it is a research project, we are hoping that the program is found effective, so we can look to the future and maybe offer something more sustainable in the community.”

Healthy Hearts, Healthy Minds is funded by the National Institutes of Health and National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities. For more information in participating in the program or the program itself, please contact 360-716-4896 or email healthyhearts@iwri.org.

 

Brandi N. Montreuil: 360-913-5402; bmontreuil@tulalipnews.com

Serving patients while raising awareness Quarterly diabetes day at the Tulalip Health Clinic

By Andrew Gobin, Tulalip News

The Tulalip Karen I. Fryberg Health Clinic held their quarterly Diabetes Day Tuesday, May 13. Diabetes Day is held once every three months, and for four hours the clinic makes all the services readily available to patients.

“With diabetes, it’s just convenient to have everybody right there and then to see me,” said Veronica Leahy, diabetes educator for the clinic. “People can come in and do their labs. Some people have had to fast, so we have healthy snacks available for afterwards.”

While Diabetes Day is intended to provide convenient all inclusive same-day service to patients, there is  also an effort to bring awareness to people on how to prevent the disease. Clinic nurses used diagrams and models to show the effects of unhealthy lifestyles and how they can lead to or magnify diabetes.

Burleigh Snyder is a patient of the clinic and an advocate for diabetes awareness. He participates in most of the diabetes events, and contributes the gardens at the clinic and at the Hibulb Cultural Center.

He said, “I should be six feet under. My highest number (highest blood sugar level) was 1873. I was found in a coma, I died three times at the hospital. I advocate for diabetes awareness so that maybe what happened to me will help someone else prevent diabetes in their life.”

Rob Taylor, who volunteers at the clinic’s garden, said, “We are showing people how to eat better. Diet is so closely tied to diabetes and obesity. Healthy eating to reduce weight is very beneficial to diabetes. We would like to expand the garden, maybe include an orchard, but that’s a ways out.”

The next Diabetes Days are August 12 and November 18. Stop in at the Tulalip Health Clinic from 9:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. on those days to learn more.

Andrew Gobin is a reporter with the See-Yaht-Sub, a publication of the Tulalip Tribes Communications Department.
Email: agobin@tulalipnews.com
Phone: (360) 716.4188

One stop diabetes shop

Diabetes day at the Tulalip Health Clinic

Tribal member Ron Anchetta takes home the broccoli he grew in the community garden at the health clinic.

Tribal member Ron Anchetta takes home the broccoli he grew in the community garden at the health clinic.

By Andrew Gobin, Tulalip News

“Rather than making multiple appointments throughout the week, today we have made available every service for diabetes testing all at once,” said Bryan Cooper about the October 15th diabetes day at the Tulalip Karen I. Fryberg Health Clinic. A day meant to inform about the disease also offers tips on diabetes prevention, healthy living, and general nutrition.

Cooper, the medical director at the clinic, made key points as to why diabetes day is a success, such as explaining the ease of diabetes testing, both for patients and staff.

“Our labs are nationally accredited. Here at the clinic, lab results are ready in 15 minutes, which is unheard of at larger clinics and hospitals.”

Although Cooper is one of the lead organizers, he emphasized the importance of the team of specialists that make diabetes day possible. “The team made themselves available, making it possible to have integrated services to streamline diabetes testing. That was one concern we kept hearing from patients, that testing was too time consuming, spanning multiple days and appointments,” said Cooper. “Today, patients can come in and get everything done at once, and it doesn’t take long to make it through each necessary station.”

Diabetes day is one aspect of a five-year plan developed last summer to create programs at the clinic geared towards community needs. Diabetes day began January of this year, and it happens 4 times a year, to allow for the convenient service for new patients, as well as those diabetic patients that need to be seen every 3 months. The staff would really like to see the clinic become a place for the community wellness center, where people could come and relax and visit, not just for medical needs.

“In addition to dental and medical, we offer alternative medicine such as acupuncture, reiki, bowen, massage, chiropractor, and traditional healing. We have a garden of traditional foods available to patients as well,” said Cooper.

Visit the clinic to learn more about upcoming events and programs, or to learn more about any of these services provided.

Tulalip clinic dispensing gardening advice for better diets

Tulalip clinic gets patients growing veggies, herbs

Mark Mulligan / The HeraldSandy Swanson, a licensed practical nurse at the Tulalip Health Clinic, waters plants in the new garden outside of the clinic on June 16. Swanson works in the elder care program, and when she gets a chance will duck outside to work in the garden. "It makes me smile to come out here and care for these plants," said Swanson.

Mark Mulligan / The Herald
Sandy Swanson, a licensed practical nurse at the Tulalip Health Clinic, waters plants in the new garden outside of the clinic on June 16. Swanson works in the elder care program, and when she gets a chance will duck outside to work in the garden. “It makes me smile to come out here and care for these plants,” said Swanson.

By Bill Sheets, The Herald

TULALIP — When a doctor at the Tulalip tribal health clinic advises a patient to eat healthier food, it doesn’t have to be only words that are heard or written down on paper.

The doctor can take the patient right outside the building and show them that they can grow that food for themselves.

A small, rudimentary vegetable garden at the Tulalip Karen I. Fryberg Health Clinic was greatly expanded this year with several new raised wooden beds. Leeks, kale, squash, cucumbers, peas, tomatoes and more are thriving in their southwestern exposure to the summer sun over Tulalip Bay.

Culinary and medicinal herbs and plants are being grown as well — parsley, tarragon, basil, lavender and rose hips, to name a few.

“It’s about engaging with our patients,” said Bryan Cooper, clinical lead at the health center. “Instead of telling them what to do, it’s ‘Let’s work together.'”

The incidence of diabetes on the reservation is high, and the garden is especially geared toward helping diabetics manage their condition through their diet.

Doctors and staff members from the lab and pharmacy have been accompanying patients to the garden to discuss the possibilities, said Roni Leahy, diabetes coordinator at the clinic.

Planting soil, tubs, gardening materials and advice have been dispensed on special-event days at the clinic, such as a recent “Diabetes Day.”

The garden is an extension of a program established two years ago with the opening of the Hibulb Cultural Center and Natural History Preserve a few miles away, Cooper said.

In one program there, young people have been taught traditional ways of harvesting and processing native medicinal plants. In another, titled “Gardening Together as Families,” a popular community vegetable garden was established.

At the clinic, the idea was to build on the success of the Hibulb programs and create a direct link between the medical facility and healthy diets, staff members said.

The late Hank Gobin, the tribes’ cultural director who helped establish the Hibulb programs, was motivated to improve tribal members’ diets in part because he himself was a diabetic. He passed away in April at age 71.

“It’s always about people and their health and well-being,” Leahy said. “That’s how we keep his memory alive.”

The clinic garden has been maintained by staff members and volunteers. At the end of the season, the food will be used at tribal events, Leahy said.

Sandra Swanson, 73, a career nurse, works full time in the clinic’s elder care program.

“Then I come out here and play,” she said, as she dug in one of the planters.

The plan is to expand the garden next year to a nearby slope facing the bay, with terraces and a trail, Cooper said.

More volunteers are needed, staff members said.

“We want to start these (gardens) and get them to a place where the community takes over,” Cooper said.

Bill Sheets: 425-339-3439; sheets@heraldnet.com.

Health fair

A health fair and blood drive is scheduled for 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Friday at the Tulalip Karen I. Fryberg Health Clinic, 7520 Totem Beach Road.

For more information call 360-716-4511.