New Snohomish County 911 service to assist when a call can’t be made

By Brandi N. Montreuil, Tulalip News

Sno. Co 911 Emergency texting service There are countless stories from 911 operators about cryptic messages from victims of crime. Buzzfeed News reported last year about a woman who called 911 and pretended to order pizza in order to hide her plea for help from an abusive boyfriend.

 

Situations like the pizza order can easily be mistaken as prank calls. Despite the quality training of 911 dispatchers, it’s tough to decide whether it’s a real emergency or someone’s idea of a joke. To date, many victims haven’t reached out to emergency services because making a phone call during a violent encounter can be too obvious.

 

Today Snohomish County completed testing and began accepting 911 emergency texts. The ability to text 911 is a lifeline in some situations. The program is still in its infancy and while individuals with plans through AT&T, Sprint, T-Mobile and Verizon can reliably text 911, internet texting services might not be reliable.

 

Being able to text 911 will benefit clients who are in domestic violence situations, especially when you are in the presence of the perpetrator, whether they are right next to you, close to you or watching over you. It will be easier to hide a text message than to talk over the phone when in an emergency. Working in this field as an advocate, I think trying new things to reach out to victims and making it possible to come forward is always a benefit,” said Leora Jones, Tulalip Tribes Legacy of Healing Women’s Advocate.

 

The traditional method of calling 911 is still preferred. The text service is touted as a secondary option, “call if you can, text if you can’t.” It is not meant to replace traditional 911 calling.

 

“Text to 911 was designated for Short Message Service (SMS) texting, but continues to evolve quickly,” said SNOCOM 911 Executive Director Debbie Grady in a July 2nd press release. “Although we’ve done extensive testing, we don’t have control over text delivery from the carriers of handsets. We don’t know how various over-the-top (OTT) applications and text from Wi-Fi will react in the 911 environment.”

 

If you’re not sure whether your carrier offers the ability to text 911, DO NOT send a “test” message to 911, instead a call your carrier and ask if this option is available under your plan.

 

If you live within the boundaries of the Tulalip Reservation, roaming poses a problem when using the new service. Cell signal strength can vary in many parts of the reservation. Tulalip Chief of Police Carlos Echevarria cautions, “The best way to reach Tulalip Police Department during an emergency is to call 360-716-9911.” A general 911 call or text is routed to SNOCOM and may or may not be transferred to Tulalip Police Department, which can lengthen response time. The Tulalip Police Department has a team of dispatchers that are fully trained to handle emergency calls and decode cryptic messages such as the pizza delivery call.

 

The option to text is welcome, however, there are shortcomings that texters should be aware of. A text can take longer to send, time is crucial in life-threatening situations. Also, location information sent through text is not the same as the information dispatchers receive when you call.

 

Other things to consider before opting for a text verses call: 911 text is not available while roaming and a text or data plan is needed to place the text. It is unknown how the new service will perform through Wi-Fi use. Also, multiple texts to 911 can be received out of order. Think back to that time you made dinner plans and your friend received the name of the restaurant before they received the text asking to meet up. Because the information isn’t always received in the order it is sent, it can be confusing for dispatchers. Last, texts may not be received depending on cell signal strength.

 

If you use the 911 text service, make sure you type in your location and provide the type of help needed. Answer questions and follow 911 dispatcher instructions. Do not use texting abbreviations, emoticons or emoji. Keep your text brief and clear and continue responding until the 911 dispatcher has closed the dialog. For those in a domestic violence situations or life-threatening circumstances, remember to silence your phone so that incoming texts are not audible.

 

Others who benefit from this new update in 911 emergency services are individuals who are deaf, hard of hearing or have a speech disability. In emergency situations, it’s not always easy to remember common safety practices, please refrain from texting and driving.

Tulalip Legacy of Healing Advocacy Center serves past and present victims of violence. For more information about their services contact 360-716-4100 or email lohsafehouse@tulaliptribes-nsn.gov.

 

Brandi N. Montreuil: 360-913-5402; bmontreuil@tulalipnews.com

Lighting fireworks banned on Tulalip reservation land due to fire danger

Photo/ Tulalip Forestry Department

Photo/ Tulalip Forestry Department

Lighting of  fireworks are banned on all Tulalip reservation lands due to increased fire danger.

Source: Tulalip Forestry Department
All outdoor burning is banned with the exception of recreational fires in approved fire pits
Recreational fires must:
·        Be built in a metal, concrete or rock fire pit, such as those typically found in designated campgrounds; and not be used as debris disposal;
·        Grow no larger than three feet in diameter;
·        Be located in a clear spot free from any vegetation for at least 10 feet in a horizontal direction, including at least 25 feet away from any structure and allow 20-foot vertical clearance from overhanging branches;
·        Be attended at all times by an alert individual and equipment capable of extinguishing the fire.
·        Cultural fires are exempt but must Be attended at all times by an individual and equipment capable of extinguishing the fire .
All outdoor burn permits are suspended until this ban is lifted. This ban will remain in effect until there is a sustained period of rainfall and the fire risk returns to low.
As the season progresses and fire danger continues to get higher additional restrictions will be implemented.

Local schools get increased support through New Dawn Security

By Brandi N. Montreuil, Tulalip News

TULALIP – A security operations management firm called New Dawn Security has partnered with Tulalip Police Department to assess risks and develop plans to mitigate risks. New Dawn who primarily works with school districts was approached last summer by Tulalip Police Chief Carlos Echevarria who saw a need for an increased risk assessment plan at the Tulalip/ Marysville School Campus, which includes the Quil Ceda & Tulalip Elementary, Heritage High School, 10th Street Middle School and Arts & Technology High School.

“I met Sean Spellecy at a meeting hosted by the Marysville Police Department where he was presenting on New Dawn. We have all heard of the statistics across Indian country about violence and crime. So when we look at Indian country violence, and children exposed to violence and drugs, we see there is a need in our tribal communities for our children to be safe and that also includes the one place they spend the most time at. When Sean’s presentation included the 26 Safe School Standards developed by the Department of Justice, I was sold. I knew it was the right thing to do,” said Echevarria.

The set of school safety standards created by the U.S. Department of Education and Department of Justice can be embedded into day-to-day school operations to make schools as safe as possible. New Dawn has developed a system based off the 26 Safe School Standards to measure a school’s safety rating.

“The first thing we do is a prevention assessment. What is currently in place to be able to prevent all of the risks that you could potentially face. This also goes for medical emergencies all the way down to transportation accidents, all of it. Anything that interrupts education environment or harms kids,” said New Dawn Security creator Sean Spellecy, a retired school principal.

During the tenure of Spellecy’s education career, horrendous crimes committed against his students prompted him to develop a program to keep students and schools safe, later called New Dawn Security.

“Ten years ago schools didn’t have to worry about 90 percent of the stuff that they have to worry about today,” said Spellecy.

Evolving monthly plans are developed according to each school’s assessment risks. These plans include training for educators on medical emergency prevention, active shooter prevention protocols, sexual abuse and misconduct protocols, crisis response and increasing police patrols and hosting law enforcement days where students learn how law enforcement work to keep them safe. Assessment risk plans can also include implementing safer locks and alarm systems, assessing the safety of school grounds, like checking for blinds spots where students may gather, anti-bullying, and what to do in case of food allergies.

Spellecy contacted Marysville School District to discuss including all district schools in a service contract following the discussions with Chief Echevarria about schools located on the Tulalip Indian Reservation. The district declined services last August due to budget concerns.

Ray Houser Marysville School District Assistant Superintendent said, “At the point in the school year when New Dawn approached us, we had not set aside specific resources or have a budget line item reserved for their type of service. Graciously New Dawn offered to conduct some piloting of their services, which we thankfully accepted. Following the piloting of New Dawn’s services, we began researching, and continue to research, their service as well as a number of other organizations that provide such services.”

Despite the decline for services by the district, the proximity of the Tulalip/Marysville Campus schools to the reservation compelled Chief Echevarria to seek funding from the Tulalip Tribes Board of Directors to seal a contract for New Dawn services for the schools.

The contract is paid out of the police department’s annual budget. Chief Echevarria said, “I didn’t want the cost of the program to be a hindrance or a deterrent for us. Once I received the go-ahead, I was going to find the funding. It was that important and that much of a need then that I was willing to do that.”

Tulalip Police Department has signed a two-year contract with New Dawn Security.  Evolving monthly plans will be developed based on assessment risk needs.

“Every single staff member at all four schools has been trained on the warning signs of a potentially violent individual and lockdown procedures protocols of the district. They had all been trained on alert, avoid, deny and defend prior to October 24,” said Spellecy.

“Having police in schools helps tremendously. Having cameras in schools helps but that only covers just one or two of the safe school standards that go out throughout the school. There is parent and student education, all this plays a part in keeping schools safe. Each of us shares a piece of this puzzle to make these schools as safe as possible. Times are changing. The role of principals to just focus on education is over, now they have to be experts in every field of safety. If I can alleviate some of that and look at school safety differently, as well as create immediate response plans on what occurs then I believe we are achieving our goals,” said Spellecy.

For more information on the New Dawn Security and the 26 Safe School Standards visit the website www.newdawnsecurity.com.

 

Brandi N. Montreuil: 360-913-5402; bmontreuil@tulalipnews.com

Native American tribes converge to discuss pot legalization

Audience members look on at a tribal marijuana conference for tribal governments considering whether to legalize marijuana for medicinal, agricultural, or recreational use, Friday, Feb. 27, 2015, in Tulalip, Wash. Representatives of 75 American Indian tribes from 35 states gathered to discuss what might be the next big financial boon on reservations across the country: marijuana. Tribes have been exploring the idea of getting into the pot business since the Obama administration announced in December it wouldn't stand in their way. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)

Audience members look on at a tribal marijuana conference for tribal governments considering whether to legalize marijuana for medicinal, agricultural, or recreational use, Friday, Feb. 27, 2015, in Tulalip, Wash. Representatives of 75 American Indian tribes from 35 states gathered to discuss what might be the next big financial boon on reservations across the country: marijuana. Tribes have been exploring the idea of getting into the pot business since the Obama administration announced in December it wouldn’t stand in their way. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)

By The Associated Press

TULALIP, Wash. (AP) — Tribal representatives from around the country are converging in Washington state to discuss the risks and rewards of marijuana legalization.

Tribes have been wrestling with the issue since the U.S. Justice Department announced in December that it wouldn’t stand in their way if they want to approve pot for medical or recreational use. The agency said tribes must follow the same law enforcement priorities laid out for states that legalize the drug.

Representatives of dozens of tribes are attending a conference Friday at the Tulalip Indian Tribe’s resort and casino north of Seattle.

Topics under discussion include the big business potential for pot, as well as concerns about substance abuse on reservations and the potential creation of a tribal cannabis association.

Speakers, from right, Hilary Bricken, Douglas Berman, Salvador Mungia and Robert Odawi Porter bow their heads during an opening prayer at a tribal marijuana conference for tribal governments considering whether to legalize marijuana for medicinal, agricultural, or recreational use, Friday, Feb. 27, 2015, in Tulalip, Wash. Representatives of 75 American Indian tribes from 35 states gathered to discuss what might be the next big financial boon on reservations across the country: marijuana. Tribes have been exploring the idea of getting into the pot business since the Obama administration announced in December it wouldn't stand in their way. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)

Speakers, from right, Hilary Bricken, Douglas Berman, Salvador Mungia and Robert Odawi Porter bow their heads during an opening prayer at a tribal marijuana conference for tribal governments considering whether to legalize marijuana for medicinal, agricultural, or recreational use, Friday, Feb. 27, 2015, in Tulalip, Wash. Representatives of 75 American Indian tribes from 35 states gathered to discuss what might be the next big financial boon on reservations across the country: marijuana. Tribes have been exploring the idea of getting into the pot business since the Obama administration announced in December it wouldn’t stand in their way. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)

 

 

Speakers Salvador Mungia, left, Robert Odawi Porter and Douglas Berman prepare to speak at a tribal marijuana conference for tribal governments considering whether to legalize marijuana for medicinal, agricultural, or recreational use, Friday, Feb. 27, 2015, in Tulalip, Wash. Representatives of 75 American Indian tribes from 35 states gathered to discuss what might be the next big financial boon on reservations across the country: marijuana. Tribes have been exploring the idea of getting into the pot business since the Obama administration announced in December it wouldn't stand in their way. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)

Speakers Salvador Mungia, left, Robert Odawi Porter and Douglas Berman prepare to speak at a tribal marijuana conference for tribal governments considering whether to legalize marijuana for medicinal, agricultural, or recreational use, Friday, Feb. 27, 2015, in Tulalip, Wash. Representatives of 75 American Indian tribes from 35 states gathered to discuss what might be the next big financial boon on reservations across the country: marijuana. Tribes have been exploring the idea of getting into the pot business since the Obama administration announced in December it wouldn’t stand in their way. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)

 

Robert Odawi Porter speaks at a tribal marijuana conference for tribal governments considering whether to legalize marijuana for medicinal, agricultural, or recreational use, Friday, Feb. 27, 2015, in Tulalip, Wash. Representatives of 75 American Indian tribes from 35 states gathered to discuss what might be the next big financial boon on reservations across the country: marijuana. Tribes have been exploring the idea of getting into the pot business since the Obama administration announced in December it wouldn't stand in their way. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)

Robert Odawi Porter speaks at a tribal marijuana conference for tribal governments considering whether to legalize marijuana for medicinal, agricultural, or recreational use, Friday, Feb. 27, 2015, in Tulalip, Wash. Representatives of 75 American Indian tribes from 35 states gathered to discuss what might be the next big financial boon on reservations across the country: marijuana. Tribes have been exploring the idea of getting into the pot business since the Obama administration announced in December it wouldn’t stand in their way. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)

 

Salvador Mungia speaks at a tribal marijuana conference for tribal governments considering whether to legalize marijuana for medicinal, agricultural, or recreational use, Friday, Feb. 27, 2015, in Tulalip, Wash. Representatives of 75 American Indian tribes from 35 states gathered to discuss what might be the next big financial boon on reservations across the country: marijuana. Tribes have been exploring the idea of getting into the pot business since the Obama administration announced in December it wouldn't stand in their way. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)

Salvador Mungia speaks at a tribal marijuana conference for tribal governments considering whether to legalize marijuana for medicinal, agricultural, or recreational use, Friday, Feb. 27, 2015, in Tulalip, Wash. Representatives of 75 American Indian tribes from 35 states gathered to discuss what might be the next big financial boon on reservations across the country: marijuana. Tribes have been exploring the idea of getting into the pot business since the Obama administration announced in December it wouldn’t stand in their way. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)

 

1 killed, 1 seriously hurt in crash near Tulalip reservation

By Komo staff, KomoNews.com

TULALIP, Wash. – Speed and alcohol are believed to be factors in a one-car crash that left a woman dead and a man seriously injured Tuesday night near the Tulalip reservation, officials said.

Deputies and medics were dispatched to the scene, Marine Drive near Hermosa Beach Drive, at about 8:30 p.m. after receiving a report of a serious crash, said Shari L. Ireton of the Snohomish County Sheriff’s Office.

Responders found a 47-year-old woman dead at the scene.

A 49-year-old man, believed to be the driver of the vehicle, was seriously injured. He was taken to Providence Hospital for treatment.

Speed and alcohol were both believed to be causing factors, but the incident remains under investigation, Ireton said.

Marine Drive was closed between Hermosa Beach Drive and 83rd Place NW for several hours for the accident investigation, but has since reopened.

The names of the crash victims were not immediately released.

Panera Bread to open new restaurant in Quil Ceda Village

Members of Tulalip Tribes Board of Directors and Quil Ceda Village planning staff joined Panera Bread's Seattle region representative Jayson Levich, for a groundbreaking ceremony on August 14, for the new Panera Bread restaurant opening in December 14. Photo/ Brandi N. Montreuil, Tulalip News

Tulalip tribal council members and Quil Ceda Village planning staff joined Panera Bread’s Seattle region representative Jayson Levich, for a groundbreaking ceremony on August 14, for the new Panera Bread restaurant opening in December 14.
Photo/ Brandi N. Montreuil, Tulalip News

TULALIP – Tulalip tribal council members and  Quil Ceda Village planning staff joined Jayson Levich, equity partner with Panera Bread for the Seattle region, to break ground for a new Panera restaurant on Thursday, August 14.

According to Quil Ceda Marketing Manager, Teresa Meece, the Tulalip Tribes and Panera Bread have signed a lease agreement to build a 4,300-square-foot restaurant. The new restaurant will be located on a vacant lot near the Home Depot in Quil Ceda Village on the Tulalip Indian Reservation and will feature the Panera menu of sandwiches, salads and baked goods, as well as a drive-through window.

“Panera Bread is a perfect addition to Quil Ceda Village,” said Meece. “In addition to their amazing food they share our values of giving back to our community. We are really excited and can’t wait for their doors to open.”

Quil Ceda Village’s Panera Bread Groundbreaking from Brandi Montreuil on Vimeo.

Wilcox Construction is currently completing prep work at the site. The restaurant is slated to open December of this year.

“It is very critical and important decision in who we partner with,” said Tulalip Tribal councilwoman Deb Parker shortly before the groundbreaking. “When we make these decisions we do it all together with one heart and one mind.”

Interim Quil Ceda Village General Manager, Martin Napeahi, explained that the Tribe carefully selects businesses for the Quil Ceda Village business park to continue building the local econcommunity. The lot that Panera will fill has sat vacant, waiting for the right business to present itself.

“How blessed we are to have been accepted as a partner after 15 years of searching for the right partner for this lot,” said Levich at the groundbreaking. “I feel humbly confident that our team will bring in the things that you want to see out of this partnership. We pride ourselves in taking great care of our customers and providing exceptional service, and quality food. On behalf of Panera Bread I am honored to become partners here and thank you for welcoming us. This is our going to be our 24th location in the Northwest and I am proud to say that it will be our very best.”

 

Brandi N. Montreuil: 360-913-5402; bmontreuil@tulalipnews.com

 

 

Tulalip Tribal Member Sentenced To 15 Years In Prison For Second Degree Murder In Death Of Toddler

One Child Dead, Second Critically Injured after Long-time Neglect

Source Press Release: United States Attorney Jenny A. Durkan
Western District of Washington, August 4, 2014

An enrolled member of the Tulalip Tribes was sentenced today in U.S. District Court in Seattle to 15 years in prison and five years of supervised release for second degree murder and criminal mistreatment in the death of one daughter and the neglect of the second, announced U.S. Attorney Jenny A. Durkan.  CHRISTINA D. CARLSON, 38, was indicted by the grand jury last May and pleaded guilty in April 2014, following the October, 2012 death of her 19-month-old daughter and the neglect of her 33-month-old daughter.  At sentencing U.S. District Judge James L. Robart said, “The details of the murder and mistreatment are nauseating…. She knew she needed to care for her children and she chose not to.”

CARLSON has been in federal custody at the Federal Detention Center at SeaTac, Washington, since January 11, 2013.  The criminal complaint and plea agreement describe how on October 8, 2012, emergency crews were called to an address on Marine Drive NE on the Tulalip Tribal Reservation where CARLSON was performing CPR on her 19-month-old daughter who was unresponsive on a blanket on the ground.  The child was unconscious, not breathing and covered in urine and feces.  A second child, a 33-month old girl, was found strapped in her car seat in a nearby vehicle.  The child was pale, unresponsive and covered in urine and feces.  The girl was transported to the hospital and later recovered.  The 19-month old child died and the Snohomish County Medical examiner classified the manner of death as homicide by parental neglect.  According to the report the child was malnourished and dehydrated, weighing only 19 pounds.  The child’s skin in the diaper area was excoriated and infested with maggots.  Her hair was infested with lice.

The investigation revealed that CARLSON had been living in the car with the girls on the property since mid-September.  On October 8, 2012 CARLSON had left the girls in the car while she went to use a phone at the residence on the property.  CARLSON admits in her plea agreement that she was away from the car for several hours, attempting to obtain drugs for her personal use.  About 20 minutes after the neighbors told her to go back to the car and her children, CARLSON returned asking them to call 9-1-1 because the youngest child was unresponsive.

The case was investigated by the Tulalip Tribal Police and the FBI.  The case was prosecuted by Assistant United States Attorney J. Tate London.

Who Wants Frybread?

Doe’z Onda Go is serving up a modern Native American classic

Frybread burger

Frybread burger. Photo/Niki Cleary

 

Indian taco

Indian taco. Photo/Niki Cleary

 

By Niki Cleary, Tulalip News

Boom City is over and you’re in between pow wows, what are you missing? Okay, besides all those opportunities for snagging. Frybread, of course! Don’t despair, you can still get your fix of that delicious, fluffy, awesomeness. Doe’z Onda Go serves frybread delicacies including Frybread burgers, Rez dogs, NLBs (Natives love bacon), and fried Oreos (Oreos wrapped in frybread), as well as the always classy frybread a la carte (which is a fancy French phrase that basically means ‘by itself’).

“Doe” is actually Nadene Foster (Klamath), also known by her nickname, Grandma DeeDee. Her frybread is made using a biscuit recipe that has been in her family for four generations, tweaked slightly to fry up crisp and light (in texture, not calories mind you).

According to Nadene, it’s not the ingredients that make her frybread special.

“It’s all made with love,” she said. “We pray every morning before we get started. We’re going to continue to produce awesome food.”

For Nadene, frybread is family tradition.

“When I moved to Southern Oregon I’d sell my bread to make a little extra money. I was always on the go. When I start making bread, all my granddaughters want to get their hands in that dough and fry their own piece!” she laughed, “They all take turns, even the boys, they all want to make their own piece.

“To go from that to where we are today is a dream come true,” said Nadene, her eyes sparkling. “It’s so exciting, I can hardly contain myself.”

Doe’z Onda Go. Photo/Niki Cleary

Doe’z Onda Go.
Photo/Niki Cleary

The magic all happens in a tiny building, located in the same lot as Off-Road Espresso on the corner of Marine Drive and 27th Avenue. Although the building is only About 140 square feet, it contains a full professional kitchen, including a griddle, deep fryer and a fire suppression system in case all that hot food gets out of hand.

Although the recipe is old, the business uses modern technology to make sure that orders are correct, and it’s easy to pay whether you’re using cash or a card. Orders, taken on an iPad, are quickly transformed into delicious meals.

Nadene and her business partner Eric Cortez (Tulalip), opened the business June 21st.

“This has always been a dream of Nadene’s. She showed me how to make the bread, and they had talked about going full-time,” said Eric. “I became part of the family, and I had the resources and funding to make it happen.

“My mom had the space, this empty building and the spot. By the taco stand (Tacos El Ray), Off-Road Espresso and the fruit stand.  Plus this is 100% authentic, modern Native American food. Tulalip owned with a twist of southern Oregon.”

The staff favorites?

Making a frybread Oreo. Photo/Niki Cleary

Making a frybread Oreo.
Photo/Niki Cleary

“Fried Oreos are popular,” said Eric. “I like just the frybread alone and the large Rez dog is my second favorite. We’re thinking about adding deep fried bananas as a dessert. I tried one of those and wow!”

“My favorite is probably just a piece of frybread with butter,” said Nadene. “But I also like the frybread burger.”

So, if you’re ready to fulfill your frybread fantasies, Doe’z Onda Go is the stop for you. Doe’z Onda Go is open Tusday through Saturday from 11:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. Short on time? Call in an order for quicker pick-up, 425-622-6289.

Click here to download a Menu

 

 

Boom City or bust!

Tulalip Boom City provides shoppers with one-stop firework shopping with over 120 stands to choose from. Photo/ Brandi N. Montreuil, Tulalip News

Tulalip Boom City provides shoppers with one-stop firework shopping with over 120 stands to choose from. Photo/ Brandi N. Montreuil, Tulalip News

Tulalip Boom City opens its 35th consecutive firework season

By Brandi N. Montreuil, Tulalip News

TULALIP – “It is a demand. There are people that want to buy fireworks and they know where to go to buy them. It’s why we are here, because of those return customers,” says Pink Cadillac stand owner and Tulalip tribal member, Dan Pablo Sr., about the annual firework-selling event in Tulalip known as Boom City.

Boom City, a malaise of 8×16 foot, cleverly decorated wooden stands displaying thousands of pyrotechnic merchandise, is in its 35th year of operation. The 126 stands owners will have a little over two weeks to sell thousands of fireworks and make a profit that can range from $2,000 to $30,000.

To organize this massive event and keep stand owners and the hundreds of thousands who come to purchase fireworks each year safe, is a group of people called the Boom City Committee. The committee, consisting of five people, is responsible for site security, sanitation, and making sure Boom City policies are followed.

To ensure safety at Boom City, security personal are on-site throughout the selling season and enforce rules for stand owners and customers, such as no smoking near the stands, only lighting off fireworks in the designated discharging area, and safety in general. Tulalip Police Department also maintains an active presence at Boom City with a K9 unit, in addition to foot patrol units, who patrol to discourage illegal activity.

Committee chairman, Dan Pablo Sr., says planning for the event takes months, and that includes collecting of permit and insurance fees from stand owners before holding a drawing for stand lot numbers. After merchandise stocking and set up is finalized, Pablo says stand owners wait for the “rush,” what he calls the four days before the 4th of July.

Photo/ Brandi N. Montreuil, Tulalip News

Photo/ Brandi N. Montreuil, Tulalip News

For 35 years, millions of customers have visited and purchased fireworks for their 4th of July celebrations, at what has been described as the single largest place to buy fireworks in the Pacific Northwest and a place unlike any other. But what makes Boom City so successful?

Pablo contributes its success to the fact that customers can purchase fireworks that are illegal in Washington state, such as firecrackers, bottle rockets, missiles and sky rockets.  Stand owners, who must be Tulalip tribal members 18 and over or spouses of Tulalip members to operate a stand, are legally able to sell these types of federal fireworks specifically due to the location of Boom City. Tulalip Reservation and it’s tribal citizens while they are on the Reservation, are subject to Tulalip and Federal firework laws, not State law, making the sale of fireworks exempt from state law, and it possible to possess and discharge them on tribal lands.

“I have seen prices in town that are lower than here, but our fireworks have more to them than what you can get in town, which is why they come here,” said Pablo, who also says the annual firework season presents a tremendous business opportunity to tribal members.

“It is a lot of work to do this. I look forward to it, and the extra money is a big draw. It is an opportunity to make extra money that you normally wouldn’t be able Boom-City_2to, but you have to have some salesmanship skills. You have to know what you have is the big thing,” said Pablo about being a successful stand owner.

It is not only stand owners who stand to make a profit at Boom City this year, but also Tulalip youth, 16 and over. Youth are hired during the firework season to help stock stands, run errands, and help draw in customers. Food vendors also hire youth to take and deliver food orders.

While stand owners are open two weeks before the 4th, it’s the few days before that they make most their profits.

“Selling is non-stop towards the end. There is no slow time. It is constant. It is a lot of work, and sometimes you don’t get lunch until 4:30 in the afternoon. It is that busy. But it is a lot of fun,” said Pablo.

Boom City will close on July 4, and is open daily from 6 a.m. to midnight. For more information regarding Boom City, please contact 360-716-4204. Or you can check out Boom City on Facebook.

 

Brandi N. Montreuil: 360-913-5402; bmontreuil@tulalipnews.com