Honoring our Veterans

By Kalvin Valdillez, Tulalip News

Each year, the Tulalip-Marysville community takes a little extra time to ensure our local veterans feel exceptionally appreciated on November 11. After spending years away from home, traveling to dangerous locations throughout the world and putting their life on the line to protect this country, it’s important to make sure our veterans are taken care of and well-respected when returning to civilian life. Because of combat, many veterans are living with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder and due to the economic climate, many veterans struggle finding employment, contributing to the rise of homelessness among veterans in the United States. As Americans, we tend to get caught up in the everyday cycle and often miss opportunities to show kindness, compassion or gratitude to the vets within our communities who are transitioning back to a life of normalcy. Many veterans throughout the weekend voiced these concerns, stating the impact of a simple thank you outside of Veterans Day can last a lifetime. 

“For me, Veterans Day is a day where we can come together as communities to say thank you to our veterans for their service,” expressed Navy Veteran, James Lovely, to the students of Totem Middle School at their annual Veterans Day Assembly. “Although, we shouldn’t only thank our vets on just that one day out of the year. I’ve been in the Navy for seventeen years, done four deployments and seen a lot of cool places around the world while serving my country. After my first deployment ended in September 2004, I went to New York to watch a baseball game, I’m a big Yankees fan. When I was in line to get my ticket, the National Anthem started playing and after it played, a little girl, about eight years old, got my attention and said ‘thank you for keeping me safe and defending our freedom’. That was fourteen years ago, it wasn’t on Veterans Day, but I still think about her thank you every single day. It stuck with me and reminded me why I joined the military and to keep fighting when I thought I no longer could.”

The Totem Middle School assembly is always a grand event that includes live patriotic music from the school band and speeches from the students. Held on the morning of Friday November 9, the young adults were excited to take a break from their first period class to listen to the veterans recall their days in the service. The annual assembly ended with the famous Armed Forces Melody, where the students honored all five branches of the military by saluting each of their flags; Army, Navy, Marines, Air Force and Coast Guard. 

Meanwhile on the other side of the freeway, the students at Quil Ceda Tulalip Elementary sat respectfully on their gym floor as the Tulalip Honor Guards presented the American, Prisoner of War/Missing in Action and Tulalip flags to begin the school’s daily morning assembly. The kids were treated to a number of stories from honorable veterans and in return, offered many adorable thank-you’s by way of special classroom presentations. 

After a heartwarming morning, the veterans said good-bye to the young students as they returned to their classrooms. The Quil Ceda assembly was just the first event for the Tulalip Honor Guards as they journeyed south to make an appearance in the 53rd Annual Veterans Day Parade on Saturday November 10, a huge celebration that takes place throughout the streets of Auburn. The Honor Guards returned to Tulalip for the Hibulb Cultural Center’s annual Honoring Our Veterans event, held on Veteran’s Day every year. 

“I work at the Tulalip Veterans Department, proudly following the footsteps of David Fryberg, Gene Zackuse and Mike Dunn,” stated Tulalip Honor Guard William McLean III to a packed longhouse the morning of the museum’s honoring. “First and foremost, I want to thank everyone for coming out today, it means so much to all of us veterans. Everyone in this room is here for a reason, for somebody. And I appreciate all of you coming out, whether it’s for a family member, loved one or for a friend, we thank you and thank them for their service.” 

Veterans Day at Hibulb begins with a roll call where all of the veterans in attendance state their name and which branch they served in. Veterans who couldn’t make the trip to the museum or are no longer with us are also honored during roll call and recognized by their family members. The gathering unites service men and women from all branches of the armed forces. Tulalip elders who served shared several colorful stories that painted a vivid picture of wartime. Reflecting on the horrors of enemy fire, the brotherhoods formed within infantries and journeying into the unknown at a young age, the vets spoke about their tours, sharing stories that always ended with a strong sense of pride for both this Nation as well as their respective tribes.

“I want to thank all of our veterans both men and women,” said Tulalip Board of Director and Vietnam Veteran, Mel Sheldon. “Tulalip has a rich history for volunteerism and participation in the military. There’s also another segment of people we can’t forget about and that’s the spouses. Wherever a veteran goes to their next post, we don’t get to hear what it was like for the spouses, to be in a strange place at different parts of the country. We want to raise our hands and thank the spouses who went along with and supported their loved ones.”

To close the 2018 Honoring Our Veterans event, the ladies of the Tulalip Veteran Quilt Project gifted their beautiful handmade quilts, that they put much time, effort and love into, to seven Tulalip Veterans for going to war and defending our country. Tulalip Chairwoman, Marie Zackuse, whose husband Gene served in the military, shared a few words before the veterans and their families emptied the longhouse. 

“I want to thank each and every one for coming out to support our veterans today,” she said. “As we honor all the veterans who are here present with us, our prayers are also with those elders who couldn’t be with us today. Thank you for the sacrifice you made to leave our reservation to serve our country and our people. Today we also want to honor our fallen heroes who paid the ultimate sacrifice as well as our gold star mothers who suffered that loss. I want to thank the Creator today for all of those veterans who are still physically with us. I also want to thank our women who are doing this wonderful gifting to our veterans and honoring them in that special way with your beautiful talents and quilting.”

Be sure to extend a huge thank you to any veteran you may meet along your journey for bravely defending us and our freedom. 

Tulalip holds annual veteran’s pow wow

By Brandi N. Montreuil, Tulalip News

 

TULALIP – Tulalip Tribes held their 23rd Annual Veteran’s Pow Wow on May 30 through June 1, at the Tulalip Resort Casino. The annual pow wow celebrates current and past Native American military servicemen and women.

Master of ceremonies was Tulalip tribal member Ray Fryberg Sr., with Sonny Eagle Speaker as arena director and Eagle Warriors as host drum.

Dancing styles included women’s fancy shawl, buckskin, and jingle while men’s dance included fancy feather, grass, and northern traditional.

 

 

Brandi N. Montreuil: 360-913-5402; bmontreuil@tulalipnews.com

Honoring Tulalip warriors: Memorial Day ceremonies commemorate their sacrifice

 

By Andrew Gobin, Tulalip News

Tulalip Honor Guard at Priest Point Cemetery.

Tulalip Honor Guard at Priest Point Cemetery. Photo: Andrew Gobin/Tulalip News

Tulalip veterans and their families, as well as the families of fallen soldiers, gathered at Priest Point and Mission Beach cemeteries Memorial Day, May 26, to remember the service men and women that gave their lives in the service of their country and to honor their sacrifice.

Natosha Gobin and her children, Aloysius, Katie, Kane, and KC, opened each Memorial Day service with a prayer in our traditional Lushootseed language.

Natosha Gobin and her children, Aloisius, Katie, Kane, and KC, opened each Memorial Day service with a prayer in our traditional Lushootseed language. Photo: Andrew Gobin/Tulalip News

Tulalip Councilwoman Marie Zackuse said, “Today, we honor those that answered the call, when war came. Those that answered the call and made the ultimate sacrifice. We are grateful for what they did.

“We also are here to honor those ones that served and returned home,” she added. “Teat-mus always talks about going to war with his brother, and how he was killed right beside him. How hard that was for him.”

Veterans that spoke recalled their comrades and the loss of friends.

Cy Williams offers a tribute to friends he lost in the armed forces during the Vietnam War. Photo: Andrew Gobin/Tulalip News

Cy Williams offers a tribute to friends he lost in the armed forces during the Vietnam War. Photo: Andrew Gobin/Tulalip News

Tulalip veteran Cy Williams said, “Of the 150 men in my unit that went to Vietnam, 26 of us returned. I buried a lot of my friends.”

Memorial Day is a day to honor and remember the sacrifice many families made for this country, as the mothers bore the sorrow of their child’s sacrifice. The names of Tulalip Gold Star Mothers were called in the roll call.

Tulalip Veteran Cy Hatch Jr. calls the roll at Priest Point Cemetery. Photo: Andrew Gobin/Tulalip News

Tulalip Veteran Cy Hatch Jr. calls the roll at Priest Point Cemetery. Photo: Andrew Gobin/Tulalip News

As Tulalip Veteran, Cy Hatch, read the roll call of fallen soldiers, he announced that, “This day is also dedicated to the Mothers who have made the supreme sacrifice.  They have suffered more than any of us can possibly imagine – our hands are raised up to these Gold Star Mothers.”

Tulalip Honor Guard at Priest Point Cemetery Memorial Day ceremony

Tulalip Honor Guard at Priest Point Cemetery Memorial Day ceremony. Photo: Andrew Gobin/Tulalip News

The 10:00 a.m. Memorial Day service at Priest Point Cemetery was carried out by the Tulalip Honor Guard, who stood steadfast through the pouring rain to honor the Tulalip warriors past and present. The weather cleared up for the 11:00 a.m. service at Mission Beach Cemetery, and the Tulalip Honor Guard, again, carried out their task impeccably.

Colorguard Gene Zackuse, Joe Jones, and Art Contraro at Mission Beach Cemetery.

Colorguard Gene Zackuse, Joe Jones, and Art Contraro at Mission Beach Cemetery. Photo: Andrew Gobin/Tulalip News

A special thanks was offered to four Veterans in particular. Mike Addie, Art Contraro, Tony Gobin, and Richard Muir Jr. cleaned up the two cemeteries over the three weeks prior, along with the Tulalip Maintenance staff, in preparation for the day’s activities.

From left to right:

Tulalip Honor Guard preparing for a 21 gun salute at the Mission Beach Cemetery on Memorial Day. (Left to Right) Gene Zackuse, Joe Jones, Art Contraro, Morris Alexander, David Fryberg Jr., Tony Gobin, Mike Gobin, Mike Addie, Richard Muir Jr., Steve Jones, Jackson Harvey, Bill McLean Jr. (Behind) Bill McLean III and Mike Dunn.  Photo: Andrew Gobin/Tulalip News

Cy Hatch Jr. calls the roll at Mission Beach Cemetery. Photo: Andrew Gobin/Tulalip News

Cy Hatch Jr. calls the roll at Mission Beach Cemetery. Photo: Andrew Gobin/Tulalip News

Tulalip Honor guard.Seated at the end of the line is World War II veteran Charlie "Red" Sheldon. Photo: Andrew Gobin/Tulalip News

Tulalip Honor guard.Seated at the end of the line is World War II veteran Charlie “Red” Sheldon. Photo: Andrew Gobin/Tulalip News

World War II veteran Stanley G. Jones Sr. recalls his time in the marines, being part of the first occupational forces in Nagasaki after the atomic bomb was dropped. Photo: Andrew Gobin/Tulalip News

World War II veteran Stanley G. Jones Sr. recalls his time in the marines, being part of the first occupational forces in Nagasaki after the atomic bomb was dropped. Photo: Andrew Gobin/Tulalip News

Tulalip Honor Guard 21 Gun Salute at Priest Point Cemetery

Tulalip Honor Guard 21 Gun Salute at Priest Point Cemetery

Tulalip Vietnam veteran and Memorial Day master of ceremonies, Mel Sheldon Jr. At times throughout each service, Sheldon spoke of his time as an Army Helicopter Pilot, remembering many peers that never made it home. Photo: Andrew Gobin/Tulalip News

Tulalip Vietnam veteran and Memorial Day master of ceremonies, Mel Sheldon Jr. At times throughout each service, Sheldon spoke of his time as an Army Helicopter Pilot, remembering many peers that never made it home. Photo: Andrew Gobin/Tulalip News

 

Gold Star Mothers (and fathers)

WWI 
Alphonsus Bob and Julianne Bob
Elison James and Katrina Bagley
Korea
Walter Moses and Marya Moses
Joseph Charles Jr. and Nora Charles
Vietnam
Donald Campbell and Katherine Campbell
Larry Price and Elsie Price
Gus Smith and Toddy Smith

Tulalip Tribes − Priest Point Cemetery

UNKNOWN SOLDIER

CHARLES JR, JOSEPH

DAVIS, WILLIAM D.

GRAVES, WALTER

HATCH SR, CHARLES

HATCH  SR, EZRA

JAMES  SR, ELSON

LEWIS, CECIL

MOSES, WALTER

WILLIAMS, JESSIE

 

Tulalip Tribes − Mission Beach Cemetery

UNKNOWN SOLDIER

ADAMS, TOMMY

ADAMS, WALTER

ALEXANDER, JOSEPH G.

ALEXANDER, JOSEPH J.

ALEXANDER SR.,  WARREN

ARCHIE, ROBERT

ASHMAN SR, CHESTER

BAGLEY, ELMER

BAGLEY, RAYMOND

BAGGARLEY, JAY

BAGGARLEY, JUNIOR

BARTO, ROBERT

BEATTY, EDWARD

BLACKBIRD, JOSEPH

BOB, ALPHONSUS

BROWN SR. ELLIOTT

BROWN, FLOYD

BROWN, LAWRENCE F.

BROWN, ROBERT

BROWN, RONALD

BRUDEVOLD, JOSEPH

BURNS, JAMES

CAMPBELL, DONALD

CHARLES, ALVIN

CHARLES, LEO

CHARLES, WESLEY

CHARLEY JR, LAWRENCE

CHARLEY SR, LAWRENCE

CHEER SR, ARNOLD

CEPA, MARTIN

CLADOOSBY JR, ERNEST

CLADOOSBY SR, ERNEST

CLEARY, ROBERT CLIFFORD

COMENOTE, GEORGE

CONTRARO, GEORGE

COLE, JAMES

COY, JOSEPH

CRAFT, SR., WILLIAM RAY

CRAIG, GEORGE

CULTEE, HARRY

DELOS SANTOS, ARTURO

DOVER, GEORGE

DOVER, WILLIAM

DUNBAR, ERNEST

DUNN, HARRY

DUNN, JAMES

ENICK SR, GERALD JOHN

EYLE, PETE

FRYBERG, BYRON

FRYBERG, MYRON JAMES

FRYBERG, RAYMOND

GATES, PATRICK

GEORGE, JACK

GOBIN, BERNARD WILLIAM

GOBIN, EMERY

GOBIN, THOMAS JOSEPH

GRANT, CLAUDE

GRENIER, RICHARD

GRENIER JR, WILLIAM

HARRISON, ORVILLE

HATCH JR, ARTHUR

HATCH SR, CLARENCE

HATCH JR, CYRUS

HATCH, EZRA (ZANE)

HATCH, LAWRENCE (LARRY)

HATCH JR, LLOYD

HATCH SR, LLOYD

HATCH, VERLE

HATCH, WAYNE

HAWK, GORDON

HEGNES, HELMER

HENRY ALEX

HILLAIRE, PHIL

HILL SR, CHARLES

HILL, THEODORE

HOOD, AL

HOPKINS, ALFORD M.

HORNE, ROMEY A.

HOWARD, SHERMAN

JAMES SR, CHARLES

JAMES, JOHNNY

JAMES MICHAEL

JAMES, WILLIAM

JIMICUM, JOSEPH

JIMICUM, LARRY

JOBEY, JAMES

JOE, LAWRENCE

JOHN, ALBERT

JOHNNY, MARTIN

JONES, BAYARD

JONES, CARL (POLY)

JONES, DARRYL

JONES, DENNIS (JERRY)

JONES JR, GEORGE

JONES, LEONARD (PENNY)

JONES JR, RALPH (BREEZER) DELNO

JONES SR., WILLIAM

JOSEPH, BERNARD

JOSEPH, HAROLD

KEOKUK, JOSEPH

KONA, ISSAC (IKE)

KONA SR, RONALD KEITH

LACY SR, CECIL D.

LAMONT JR, LEVI

LAMONT SR, LEVI

LECLAIRE, ROBERT

LECLAIRE, ALAN

LEDFORD SR, ALAN

LYLE, GALEN

LYLE, WILLIS

MADISON, FRANK

MATTA, ART

MCCOY, RICHARD R. (DICK)

MCDEVEITT, JAMES

MCKAY, JR. ARNOLD

MCLEAN, WILFORD

MCLEAN SR, WILLIAM

MILLER, JOE

MONGER, JAMES

MORRISON, DERYLE

MOSES JR, KENNETH

MOSES SR, KENNETH

MOSES, MORGAN

MOSES, RONALD EDWARD

MOSES SR, ROBERT

MYERS, ROBERT EARL

NAPEAHI, JR., WILLIAM

NAPOLEON, HENRY

NUCHOLS, JOHN

OLIVER, CHARLES (MANNY)

PABLO SR, LOUIE

PATRICK, DANIEL

PAUL, HAROLD

PERRY, WILFRED

PRICE, LARRY

PRICE, PAUL

PROUTY, WILL

PYOTT, KENNETH

REESE, WILLIE

REEVES SR, CONRAD

REEVES, GEORGE

REHDER, CARL

RENECKER SR, ROCKY

RETASKET, GARY

RICE, GEORGE

RIVERA, CARLOS

RIVERA, JOHN

ROSS, JOHN H.

RYNER, HOMER

SAM, ALFRED

SANDERS, REGINA

SCHEEHAGEN, EDWARD

SHELDON, FRANCIS

SHELDON JR., LAWRENCE

SHELDON SR., MELVIN

SHELDON, ROBERT (BOB)

SHELTON, ALOYSIUS

SHELTON, CLARENCE

SHELTON, REUBEN

SHELTON, WILLIAM “BILL”

SMITH JR, GUS

SMITH, RUSSELL

SNEATLUM SR, CHARLES

SPENCER JR, RICHARD

STEVE, WILFRED

TAYLOR, CURTIS

TAYLOR JR,   DALLAS

THOMAS, LOUIS

TOM, HARRY R.

TORY, JAMES

UPCHURCH, O. C.

VAN PELT, LEONARD

WALKER, GEORGE

WARBUS, JOSEPH

WELLS, WALTER

WILLIAMS, BENJAMIN

WILLIAMS SR, BERNARD

WILLIAMS JR, CHARLES

WILLIAMS SR, CHARLES

WILLIAMS, CHRIS

WILLIAMS JR, EDWARD

WILLIAMS SR, EDWARD

WILLIAMS SR, GEORGE

WILLIAMS, JOSEPH

WILLIAMS, KENNETH

WILLIAMS, LEONARD

WILLIAMS, MARVIN (SPUD)

WILLIAMS, RANDOLPH

WILLIAMS, RANDOLPH (RANDY)

WILLIAMS SR, RICHARD

WILLIAMS STEVE

WOLD, SEVERIN (SAM)

 

Andrew Gobin is a staff reporter with the Tulalip News See-Yaht-Sub, a publication of the Tulalip Tribes Communications Department.
Email: agobin@tulalipnews.com
Phone: (360) 716.4188

Memorial Day Preparations

Memorial Day

By Andrew Gobin, Tulalip News

Memorial Day will be observed on Monday, May 26 this year. The Tulalip Veterans Department has been working hard to prepare for the ceremonies, cleaning up the cemeteries and placing flags.

Mike Addie, Tony Gobin, and Richard Muir have been working at Priest Point and Mission Beach cemeteries, cleaning up gravesites and doing a bit of landscaping.

“We work on all of the graves, not just the veterans. We want all of the families to be well represented that way,” said Richard Muir.

The three veterans have been working for a few weeks, and will be finished for this weekend’s activities in observance of Memorial Day. Services will be Monday, May 26, 10:00 a.m. at the Priest Point cemetery and 11:00 a.m. at the Mission Beach cemetery.

Memorial Day Memorial Day Memorial Day

Andrew Gobin is a reporter with the See-Yaht-Sub, a publication of the Tulalip Tribes Communications Department.
Email: agobin@tulaliptribes-nsn.gov
Phone: (360) 716.4188

Tulalip marks first Welcome Home Vietnam Veterans Day with potluck celebration

 

Veterans from all military branches supported each other during the first Welcome Home Vietnam Veterans celebration, organized by Tulalip veteran marine Andy James. Photo/ Brandi N. Montreuil, Tulalip News

Veterans from all military branches supported each other during the first Welcome Home Vietnam Veterans celebration, organized by Tulalip veteran marine Andy James.
Photo/ Brandi N. Montreuil, Tulalip News

by Brandi N. Montreuil, Tulalip News

TULALIP – U.S. Vietnam veterans have been home for more than 40 years, but due to anti-war sentiment with the American public, returning soldiers quietly rejoined their communities without receiving a national welcome home.

In 2011, the U.S. Senate, decided to change this. The Senate unanimously passed a resolution to provide Vietnam veterans a chance to be properly welcomed home by designating March 30, Welcome Home Vietnam Veterans Day. The designated day marks the final withdrawal of all combat and combat-support troops from Vietnam on March 29, 1973.

Welcome-Home-Vietnam-Vets-Celebration

Photo/ Brandi N. Montreuil, Tulalip News

Although veteran organizations across the nation have been celebrating the day since its passing, only three states, California, Oregon, and Washington, have recognized the day officially, including flying the POW/MIA flag in addition to the U.S. flag and state flags on all government buildings.

Last year Governor Jay Inslee deemed March 30 for Washington State after Rep. Norm Jackson (Yakima) (R) introduced 2013 House Bill 1319 on January 23, 2013.  The bill passed 97 to 0 in the House and again passed 48 to 0 in the Senate and was signed by Gov. Inslee on March 29, 2013.

This year, Tulalip hosted their first annual Welcome Home Vietnam Veterans celebration in honor of their fellow veterans. Attendees included tribal and non-tribal veterans who gathered at the Tulalip Boys & Girls Club to mark the official homecoming.

Tulalip veteran Andy Jones, pictured in cedar hat, served during the Vietnam Conflict with the Marines, organized the celebration. Photo/ Brandi N. Montreuil, Tulalip News

Tulalip veteran Andy James, pictured in cedar hat, served during the Vietnam Conflict with the Marines, organized the celebration.
Photo/ Brandi N. Montreuil, Tulalip News

Tulalip veteran and tribal member Andy James, who served with the Marines during the Vietnam conflict, organized the event.

“I am extremely thankful and grateful for my elders, particularly the ones who put on uniforms in defense of this country before I did. We have one here today that did,” said James, referring to Tulalip tribal member and Korean War veteran Ray Moses (Te-at-mus).

“I wanted to do something to mark this day, so I organized a potluck,” continued James. “I am thankful for every veteran, and we realize it was all for the cause.  We did what we had to to defend our country, and I am glad to celebrate this day and welcome home my fellow veterans.”

 

Brandi N. Montreuil: 360-9135402; bmontreuil@tulaliptribes-nsn.gov

 

Traditional Southern Grass dancer Jeff Brown danced for visiting veterans during the Welcome Home Vietnam Veterans Day.Photo/ Brandi N. Montreuil, Tulalip News

Traditional Southern Grass dancer Jeff Brown danced for visiting veterans during the Welcome Home Vietnam Veterans Day.
Photo/ Brandi N. Montreuil, Tulalip News

 

 

 

 

A day of remembrance: Veterans honored at Hibulb luncheon

Brothers Tony and Mike Gobin of the Tulalip Honor Guard present the colors at the Veterans Luncheon.Photo: Andrew Gobin, Tulalip News

Brothers Tony and Mike Gobin of the Tulalip Honor Guard present the
colors at the Veterans Luncheon.
Photo: Andrew Gobin, Tulalip News

By Andrew Gobin, Tulalip News Reporter

Veterans and their families packed the Longhouse at the Hibulb Cultural Center & Natural History Preserve on Monday, November 11th. The event hosted by Hibulb staff, which was open to all veterans in the Tulalip community, featured a lunch incorporating traditional foods in addition to an honoring and healing ceremony. Veterans that spoke reminded those in attendance about the sacrifices made by soldiers and their families, emphasizing the importance of remembering the cost of the world we live in.

With the presentation of the colors by the Tulalip Honor Guard, the Veterans Day celebration began. Each veteran was thanked with a blanket, introducing themselves while taking a moment to speak about their service. Some listed their rank and various wars and theaters, while others spoke about what Veterans Day means to them.

Tulalip Tribal veteran Ray Moses telling war stories at the healing ceremony.Photo: Andrew Gobin, Tulalip News

Tulalip Tribal veteran Ray Moses telling war stories at the healing ceremony.
Photo: Andrew Gobin, Tulalip News

“It’s important to remember the veterans and to thank them,” said Tulalip Chairman Mel Sheldon, a Vietnam veteran. He referred to the ill tempers and bad attitudes that Americans had towards the Vietnam War, and in turn, how poorly returning soldiers were treated. “Today is a day to honor the sacrifice made. When war came you raised your hand, and we thank you for your service.”

“It is important to remember the families and their sacrifice,” said veteran, David Ventura. “They had to sacrifice time with their sons and brothers, and many times a life shared. Mothers, fathers, wives, brothers and sisters all had to live with the uncertainty of someone they loved dearly, for the service they gave to this nation.”

Korean War veteran Ray Moses spoke about the horrors of war.

“When I was in Korea,” he began, “my brother was killed right along side me. That moment was the most helpless feeling I have ever experienced. I couldn’t cry; I couldn’t get mad. All I could do was keep fighting. I had to. The worst memories I have are about death.”

Richard Muir Jr. holds a beading seminar for Veterans Day at Hibulb. He is demonstrating the technique called Peyote Stitch.Photo: Andrew Gobin, Tulalip News

Richard Muir Jr. holds a beading seminar for Veterans Day at Hibulb. He is demonstrating the technique called Peyote Stitch.
Photo: Andrew Gobin, Tulalip News

He paused a moment. “Why do I tell you these things? People these days say, ‘we don’t want to hear that, those old things.’ And I tell them, without those old things all these new things wouldn’t be here.”

Hibulb staff served a lunch of fry bread and hamburger stew, along with traditional foods including mushrooms, nettle tea, and black moss pudding, which in our culture is a medicine for calming the spirit and mind.