Road Closure and Construction Notice

Q-Roadway Improvements and Infrastructure Project

Beginning the middle of November 2018, the intersection of 62nd Place NE and 31st Avenue NE will be closed due to construction of a new compact roundabout at the intersection. It is anticipated that the intersection will be closed for approximately 3 months.
During this closure, access to businesses along 62nd Place NE will be routed through the Tribal Justice Center parking lot as shown in the diagram below. Access to 31st Ave NE south of the closure area will be made via 33rd Ave NE and 60th Place NE.

N8tive Vote 2018 Rez-to-Rez tour visits Tulalip

By Micheal Rios, Tulalip News

On October 27, tribal leaders embarked on a momentous 10-day tour to visit all 29 of Washington State’s tribal nations in a first-of-its-kind effort to encourage Native citizens to have their voice heard by voting in the November 6 midterm election. 

According to the National Congress of American Indians (NCAI), nationwide 34% of eligible Native voters are not registered to vote. The turnout rate of American Indian and Alaska Native registered voters is also very low, being historically 5 to 14 percentage points lower than the rate of many other racial and ethnic groups. The Rez-to-Rez tour aimed to change that by going directly to Native voters and encouraging them to vote.

“The Puyallup Tribe is proud to sponsor the N8tive Vote 2018 Rez-to-Rez tour,” said Puyallup Tribe Chairman Bill Sterud. “This is the very first time we’ve had an intertribal tour like this. Now is the time to stand up and use your voice so get out and vote!”

While encouraging Native voter turnout, N8tive Vote 2018 also shared information about initiatives 1631 (Carbon Emissions Fee Measure) and 940 (De-Escalate Washington).

“This is a historical election year for Washington natives with both I-1631 and I-940 involving Native peoples and communities at their core,” said Quinault President Fawn Sharp. “As Natives, we have power… the power of our voice, the power of our unity and strength, and the power of our vote. We encourage all Natives to exercise that power by voting in this year’s election.”

The N8tive Vote 2018 movement came about thanks to a political coalition, called the First American Project, founded by an all-star collective of Native American leaders from within the state and their allies from fellow communities of color. With a mission to advocate for righteous environmental and civil rights policies, the First American Project’s first priority was to pass I-1631, the comprehensive climate change policy that was co-authored by tribal leadership. 

After visiting 21 tribes in seven days, N8tive Vote’s Rez-to-Rez tour made their 22nd stop at Tulalip on Friday, November 2. An engaged gathering of 40+ individuals from youth to elders convened at the Tulalip Youth Center for an evening dedicated to empowering each and every Native citizen to cast their votes and mail in their ballots. 

“My hands go up to all of you who are committed to spreading awareness and encouraging participation in this most important midterm election,” expressed Tulalip Chairwoman Marie Zackuse during the voting rally. “We must work hard to protect our people and our sovereignty that is being attacked every single day. We must never forget our ancestors who stood up strong and fought for us as a people to have the right to vote, to have our voices count.”

Tulalip tribal member Ryan Miller was recognized for his steadfast commitment to advocating and creating policies that protect the environmentand our treaty rights.

During the evening’s event, Tulalip tribal members Terry Williams and Ryan Miller were both recognized for their steadfast commitment to strengthening our community by advocating and creating policies that protect the environment and our treaty rights. For their years of service and dedication they both were wrapped in blankets and gifted cedar woven headbands. 

Tulalip tribal members Theresa Sheldon and Terry Williams with
Tim Reynon, Puyallip tribal council member. Terry was recognized by N8tive Vote Washington for his work in fighting climate change and protecting our treaty rights.

“It has been a very good day. A day where we came together as different tribes to speak the same language and see the same vision of what’s in front of us,” reflected Terry, who made his career as a treaty rights commissioner working for Natural Resources. “The togetherness allows us to walk in unison with good hearts and good minds as we look to protect our Mother Earth.” 


Celebrating midterm election results

Progress, justice, and history is being celebrated around Indian Country as Election Day results showed Democrats regaining control of the House of Representatives, Sharice Davids (Ho-Chunk) and Deb Haaland (Laguna Pueblo) becoming the first-ever Native women elected to Congress, and the tribal-sponsored Initiative 940 (De-Escalate Washington) passed with strong support.

“Washington becomes the first state in the nation to respond to the national conversation about use of force by passing a ballot measure by a direct vote of the people,” stated De-Escalate Washington’s official campaign page following the victory. “Yes on 940 will improve training, save lives, and help build better relationships between law enforcement and the communities they serve.”

A large contingent of 250+ Native citizens gathered at the Puyallup Tribe’s stylish showroom for an election night viewing party. The occasion also marked the final destination of N8tive Vote 2018’s Rez-to-Rez tour. 

“We are so grateful for Theresa Sheldon’s (center) leadership during our Rez-to-Rez tour. I call her the cheerleader because at every tribe we visited she would always lead us with her enthusiasm.”  – Puyallup Tribe councilman Tim Reynon.

“Today, we finished our 29th tribe on our amazing Rez-to-Rez tour,” reflected Tulalip tribal member Theresa Sheldon while addressing the crowd of supporters. “We have driven across the state from plateaus to the ocean, up and down the Salish Sea to encourage our people to vote! It’s been a fast and furious trip and I’m so thankful for this time.

“It’s been an absolute honor and privilege to have served on this journey to empowering our Indigenous communities,” she continued. “That fact that Initiative 940 passed is amazing; that is victory, that is justice, and that is speaking to the power of what we can achieve when we stand united.”

Celebrations were also enjoyed more locally by the Tulalip Tribes and their allies thanks to tribal member Senator John McCoy retaining his position by defeating challenger Savio Pham, and the passing of Fire District 15 Proposition #1, which will provide the Tulalip Bay Fire Department with much needed funding to upgrade emergency medical services.

Raising Hands: Celebrating charities and community groups making a positive impact

“We have not forgotten what it’s like to be in need; as we succeed because of our community,
we have a responsibility to give back.” – Chairwoman Marie Zackuse (2nd from left)

By Micheal Rios, Tulalip News 

On the evening of October 27, the Tulalip Tribes recognized and gave thanks to the 488 Washington non-profits and community groups who made a significant difference over the past year at the 11th annual Raising Hands celebration event. Held in the Tulalip Resort Casino’s Orca Ballroom, the stylish space was filled to max capacity as representatives of these high-impacting organizations came together to create an atmosphere of gratitude and shared values for making our community better.

“In the Tulalip Tribes tradition, we raise our hands to show appreciation to the numerous organizations that work so hard to contribute services to our community,” stated Chairwoman Marie Zackuse. “It is truly remarkable how many of our citizens, non-profits, and community organizations are involved in efforts to improve health care, education, natural resources and the well-being of our communities. The Tulalip Tribes holds this event every year to let these individuals, organizations, and surrounding communities know that we value their good works.”

This year’s Raising Hands recognized the prior year in community achievement stimulated by a record $7.9 million in Tulalip support to more than 480 charitable organizations. Since 1992, the Tulalip Tribes charitable giving program has donated over $92.1 million in critical support to the community and, indirectly, to their own membership by supporting regional efforts to improve education, health and human services, cultural preservation, public services, the environment, and the economy.

But the Raising Hands event isn’t all about dollars and cents. At the annual celebration, our community’s change makers are given a chance to celebrate each other, to share their plans for the future, and to learn how others are striving to make a difference in our communities. This is an invaluable benefit for organizations who can sometimes struggle to get their message broadcast to the larger community. 

This year, six recipient non-profits received special recognition for all that they do. Habitat for Humanity of Snohomish County, Leah’s Dream Foundation, Long Live the Kings, NorthWest Therapeutic Riding Center, Progressive Animal Welfare Society (PAWS), and Seattle’s Youth Symphony Orchestra (Musical Pathways Project) were highlighted for their good work serving the community. 

Additionally, there are traditional songs, speeches from tribal leaders, and videos that underscore the good work that is being done. Lushootseed language teacher, Maria Martin, opened the event with a compelling prayer. She was followed by the next generation of Tulalip culture bearers, 10-year-old KT Jean Hots and 8-year-old Allyea Lu Hernandez, performing Martha “səswix̌ab” LaMont’s Berry Picking Song. The exchange of cultural knowledge and understanding that took place at this year’s event was truly a sight to behold. 

“When you see people having these amazing, positive conversations that is when we see we are making a difference. Giving people the opportunity to work together is worth its weight in gold,” asserted Marilyn Sheldon, manager of Tulalip Tribes Charitable Fund. “We try to show respect and honor these charities that give so much of themselves for this community. We want them to feel like the red carpet got laid out, and that it’s just for them.

“Each year, as soon as the event is over, we ask ourselves how we can help make the next one better,” continued Marilyn. “Some days, I feel so blessed that this is my job. We are so fortunate to be able to work with these amazing organizations in Snohomish and King Counties, and throughout Washington State that do so much good in our communities.”

The Indian Gaming Regulatory Act (IGRA) of 1988 allows tribes to conduct certain types of gaming if they enter into a gaming compact with the state. Tulalip’s tribal-state gaming compact, like most, includes a provision to donate a percentage of gaming earnings to organizations impacted by gaming, as well as other charitable organizations. From this provision the Tulalip Tribes Charitable Fund was created.

Charitable Contributions Fund provides the opportunity for a sustainable and healthy community for all. The Tulalip Tribes strives to work together with the community to give benefits back to others to help build a stronger neighborhood. That’s why, in Tulalip, it is tradition to ‘raise our hands’ to applaud and give thanks to the numerous organization in our region that strive to create a better world through positive action. 

Non-profits and community groups may apply for quarterly awards through the Tulalip Cares program. For more information, visit the Tulalip Tribes Charitable Funds website at www.TulalipCares.org 

 

Tulalip Police Halloween Safety Tips

OFC Dyer,  Tulalip Police Department

Summer is over and Halloween is here! The Tulalip Police department wants everyone to enjoy this spooky holiday safely. Here are some tips for families to stay safe and enjoy a night out Trick-or-Treating.

Going door to door to stranger’s houses, crossing streets at night, and accepting food from people you don’t know are all things that parents generally hope their children avoid doing. The major exception to this is Trick-or-Treating.

Parents and Guardians can mitigate these risks by accompanying their children as they go door to door.

Limit what candy children eat as they Trick-or-Treat so that you can inspect it prior to it being eaten.

Avoid homemade treats unless you are comfortable with the source.

As children walk around at night they can increase their visibility with glow sticks, flashlights or reflective material. Be sure to follow all pedestrian signs.

Costumes that depict realistic weapons should be avoided in public as they can scare people and generate false police calls.

Encourage children to stay in groups and to have frequent contact with their Parent or Guardians.

If the house does not have decorations or at the very least porch lights it is likely that the residence is not participating in the festivities and should be avoided.

Jack-O-Lanterns may also present fire danger if they are left unsupervised. There are electronic illumination alternatives to keep your pumpkin shining bright.

Halloween Night is famous for mischief and pumpkin smashing. It may be necessary to take pumpkins or other decorations inside to avoid tempting vandals.

The Tulalip Police Department wishes you a fun and safe Halloween!

Fishing and Wildlife Commission Hunting Meeting

Hunting Meeting will be on November 14th, 2018 at 5:00pm and will be located at The Tulalip Administration Building in room 162; this will be an open meeting to discuss the upcoming hunting season. All Tulalip Tribal Hunters welcome!

 

The Tulalip Tribes Natural Recourse, 6406 Marine Drive, Tulalip, Wa 98271

Melody Hatch Office (360)-716-4565    melodyhatch@tulaliptribes-nsn.gov

Phone Scam targeting Elders

OFC Dyer,  Tulalip Police Department, October 29, 2018

There has been a phone scam circulating in our community targeting Grandparents and Elders.

The scam typically begins with a person pretending to be a grandchild asking their Grandparent or respected Elder for help. The person on the phone will begin with something like, “It’s your favorite Grandson” or, “ Do you know who this is Grandma?” and after they learn the name of the person they are impersonating they will develop a story where they need financial assistance or money for an ‘emergency.’

The scammer will then give the benevolent Elder instructions on how to wire money through Western Union or a similar wire service, often to a location in another country.

This scam disproportionately targets Senior Citizens and prays on their generosity.

If you receive a call from someone claiming to be a relative in distress ask them questions to verify their identity. Talk with other family members to try to validate the story you are hearing over the phone.

Be wary of requests to send money over wire transfer or over the internet. In many cases the scammers will give up if they suspect the person on the other line is skeptical or aware of the scam.

As the Holidays approach scammers are working hard to get their share. Protect yourself and your family by alerting them of this phone scam.