Safety fair benefits kids from Boys and Girls Club

Snohomish County Fire District 15 firemen thrilled the kids with blasting firehoses. Photo/Micheal Rios

Snohomish County Fire District 15 firemen thrilled the kids with blasting firehoses.
Photo/Micheal Rios, Tulalip News 

 

BG Fair-Front

Photo/Micheal Rios, Tulalip News

 

by Micheal Rios, Tulalip News

Hundreds of kids from the Tulalip Boys and Girls Club learned how to be prepared for emergencies at a health and safety fair held on Friday, November 13. The day of fun-filled, educational activities was in response to a large wind storm that knocked power out in major parts of the Tulalip Reservation only weeks ago.

The fair included services and education from various departments within the Tribes’ network, including the Health Clinic, Police Department, and Youth Services.

The theme behind this year’s safety fair was to have children and their parents prepare for emergencies with educational fun for the whole family.

The Red Cross was on hand to oversee their ‘pillowcase project’, where kids ages 3 and up receive a pillowcase to build their own personal emergency supplies kit. Kids 5 and up were taught compression CPR by a professional team who provided video tutorials and hands-on learning tools for the youth.

 

Kids learning compression CPR. Photo/Micheal Rios, Tulalip News

Kids learning compression CPR.
Photo/Micheal Rios, Tulalip News

 

Washington Poison Center representatives were on-hand with their Mr. Yuk mascot and resources. They provided information about poisonings and toxic substances to the children by way of a spin the wheel game. For each spin of the wheel, a child would be asked whether a certain item was poisonous or not if digested/inhaled, and prizes were awarded for correct answers. For incorrect answers, the Mr. Yuk representative would explain to the child how the item was poisonous and potential effects if digested/inhaled.

Highlighting the safety fair was the presence of Snohomish County Fire District 15. Children lined up by the scores to meet the firemen, sit in the firetruck and use the fire hose to blast water at safety cones.

 

Washington Poison Center representatives taught kids about about poisonings and toxic substances using a wheel spinning game. Photo/Micheal Rios

Washington Poison Center representatives taught kids about about poisonings and toxic substances using a wheel spinning game.
Photo/Micheal Rios, Tulalip News 

 

“It’s important for the kids to hear it come from people besides us,” says B&GC administrative assistant Diane Prouty on the importance of the safety fair. “We want them to hear it from the professionals, so that they know what we say is true. And that they listen when we talk to them about the different kinds of safety, whether it be bus safety or fire safety. We just want to make sure that all children in our community are safe and that they have the opportunity to learn it right here at the club.”

 

Photo/Micheal Rios, Tulalip News

Photo/Micheal Rios, Tulalip News

 

 

Contact Micheal Rios, mrios@tulaliptribes-nsn.gov