beda?chelh extends support and resources to local families

By Kalvin Valdillez, Tulalip News 

Parenting is an on-going learning experience. In your relationship with your child there are many dynamics that are constantly changing as you each grow. And although your kids provide you with a lifetime of cherished memories, there are also trying times and intense moments where kids will naturally rebel and forgo your instruction and advice. In extreme matters, parents may feel like they are losing control and as misbehavior continues, they may feel fed up and not know where to turn for help. 

Did you know that there are a handful of Children’s Administration evidence-based programs available to parents and caretakers of the community by referral through beda?chelh? By requesting assistance from a beda?chelh social worker, Tulalip families can participate in programs that address their specific needs and are geared toward improving and restoring family relationships. There are seven programs in total that range in public classroom-style settings to private in-home sessions; and each program specializes in certain age groups, varying from birth to eighteen.  

Tulalip tribal member and Child Advocacy Center (CAC) Manager Jade Carela is currently working on attaining her master’s degree. In doing so, Jade has taken up a 12-hour a week internship with beda?chelh, on top of her very busy schedule. She explained that as a part of her training, she wants to educate the community about these resources and inform local parents about how beda?chelh can assist their family without removing the child from the home. 

“You can call beda?chelh and talk to a social worker like, hey I’m having these issues, what programs can I benefit from?,” she explains. “beda?chelh would have to make a referral for the family to these services. If you have an open case or a referral comes in about you, and beda?chelh goes out to talk to you, then they can refer you to these services without opening a dependency on your child. The CPS workers would set-up a safety plan with you so they can keep in contact to make sure that program’s working for you.

“Another way is parents can actually call the CPS intake line, which is 1(866) END-HARM, and request services for their family. The state will then open a family volunteer service case (FVS), but it’s just to monitor and assist the family while they’re choosing which program would be best for them to utilize.”

For years, beda?chelh social workers have dedicated their careers to ensuring Tulalip children are safe, first and foremost, and continue living within their families and community, which allows the kids to engage in their culture and learn about their heritage if removed from their homes. The tribal-based child protective services program has seen a number of reunifications over the years, guiding parents in the right direction who are actively pursuing custody of their children. beda?chelh is involved with both the child and parent from the moment a concern is reported, throughout the placement process as well as post-reunification. When a parent reaches out to beda?chelh for additional support, the social workers will not only refer them to the appropriate program, they will also attend all of the sessions to observe and help moderate.  

After a family is reunified, they may experience difficulties getting reacclimated and conflict may arise. At this point in time, a social worker can discuss the issues happening in the home with the family and refer them to one of the evidence-based programs.

A brief summary of each of the seven programs are listed as follows; Positive Parenting Program (Triple P) an in-home 10 to 14-week program for children ages 2 to 16 years old that focuses on increasing safety, improving the parent’s ability to deal with the child’s behavior in different situations and decrease emotional and developmental problems in the child’s behavior; Project Safe Care, for ages birth to 5, is an in-home service for 18 to 22 weekly visits. The program aims to increase home safety and child supervision, improve parent and child relationships and learn the appropriate use of regular and emergency care; 

The Incredible Years (IY) which offers three classes – baby class (birth to 8 months), toddler class (9 months to 2 years old) and preschool class (2 to 8 years old). Expected outcomes from IY include the child understanding their feelings, improving problem solving and coping skills and also decreasing the amount hitting and yelling at home or at school; Parent-Child Interactive Therapy (PCIT) is intended for ages 2 to 7 where therapists will place an earpiece in the parent’s ear and coach them through an interaction with their child behind a one-way mirror; 

Family Functional Therapy (FFT) is for the older kids between 11 and 18 and is in-home for 10 to 15 weekly sessions. This program discusses appropriate discipline, increasing communication between the family, reducing teen substance abuse and stabilizing youth’s behavior and academics at school; Promoting First Relationships (PFR) is a 10 to 14-week program that is in-home where therapists teach new parenting skills through live coaching; and Intensive Family Preservation Services (Homebuilders) specializes in birth to 18. This 4 to 6-week intensive intervention program requires face-to-face family time and is focused on connecting families with natural support within their community while also teaching crisis intervention, life skills and cognitive-behavioral therapy. 

“I just don’t think the community knows that these different services can be offered to people and families,” says Jade. “I think that it’s so important to let the community know that beda?chelh is not just here as social workers, but they can actually refer you out to these different services that you can utilize through different parts of your life with your family. Or if you’re a parent who has a troubled teen, it’s not that you want CPS or beda?chelh to come get your kid, but you need some help, some structure, some skills and they can refer you to a program that can come into your home and work with you and your kiddo.”

For additional details, please contact beda?chelh at (360) 716-3284.

Finding Your Way with Diabetes

By Kalvin Valdillez, Tulalip News 

On the evening of March 7, the Tulalip Diabetes Care and Prevention program hosted their first Finding Your Way with Diabetes gathering of the year in the newly constructed conference room at the Karen I. Fryberg Health Clinic. After great success last summer, the interactive course was brought back to help local diabetics get a better understanding of how to manage their diabetes.

Finding Your Way with Diabetes is led by Diabetes Educators, Miguel Arteaga (RN) and Natasha LeVee (PharmD) who guide the participants through an hour and a half long class that includes games, snacks and plenty of laughter. Participants are encouraged to share their stories with their fellow diabetics to give insight into the disease and how it can affect others in both similar and different ways. 

The latest report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) revealed that Native Americans are still at great risk and twice as likely to be diagnosed with diabetes, but because of programs like Diabetes Care and Prevention, Indigenous Peoples living with diabetes are learning how to responsibly manage their blood glucose levels, eat healthy nutritious foods, and participate in physical activity as well as gain more general knowledge about diabetes. 

“The inspiration behind the class is we we’re trying to figure out a way to provide something for [diabetics] that was kind of like the Wisdom Warriors,” says Miguel. “The Wisdom Warriors is a self-help group where people learn skills and get together like a family, have a meal and share with one another. We wanted somethingthat lets us facilitate discussion between all the people, where they’re all learning from one another and they see that they’re not by themselves. They end up teaching each other, and we just provide some friendly expertise along the way.”

At the start of each class, Miguel and Natasha ask the participants if there are any topics they would like to discuss, compiling a list of subjects to touch upon as the class progresses. The students then use a road map, which looks like a giant board game, for the remainder of the class. The road map provides several games like ‘Fact or Myth’ as well as a variety of discussion topics allowing the participants to engage in healthy conversation regarding nutrition, insulin, medication, types of diabetes as well as their daily successes and struggles as they work their way through the map. 

“The reason why this is in a real colorful format is to give people some talking points,” Miguel explains. “We’re talking about living your life better and we treat it like a road map. That’s why it has the road and multiple stops where we talk about certain topics, later on when we get into nutrition, we’ll talk about places where you can eat, getting fast food and where to find more nutritious foods. We talk about things that happen in real life and the decision process of how to keep ourselves safe. We’re trying to get good information out to people so they’re more empowered and they can make better decisions about how they’re going to live their lives.”

The Finding Your Way with Diabetes class provides an opportunity for local diabetics and their families to find a sense of community. The first class was an intimate gathering where three individuals became acquainted and shared their personal journey. Community member Jim Dunham and Tulalip tribal member Marvin Jones, who both have type 2 diabetes, welcomed newcomer Daniel Charlie to the group. Daniel shared his history, explaining how he was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes a few short years ago. He nearly lost his life due to a rough bout of pancreatitis that put him into a hospital for ten months, in which he was in a coma for over four of those months. Jim and Marvin were both flabbergasted as he described his story. They commended him for fighting for his life and also encouraged him to keep pushing forward, advising him to take it one day at time while also extending their support as he continues living with diabetes. By the end of the class Daniel was embraced with hugs and personal discussion from both the participants and the instructors.

“That’s what it’s all about,” Miguel states. “To provide something that’s more like a self-help group than just telling them information and giving them papers, saying here read this. We want to let people know that they’re welcome, that they have something to share. This is not something that anybody needs to feel bad about, ashamed or guilty about. It’s something that happens and there are certain ways we need to act or skills we need to develop to take care of it. I hope people will read this article and want to be a part of this or if they know someone with diabetes and want to learn more about it, to get their family member here so we can help them have a better life.”

Finding Your Way with Diabetes is hosted at the Karen I. Fryberg Health Clinic every Thursday in March from 4:30 p.m. until 6:00 p.m. The Diabetes Care and Prevention program has an eventful year planned for the community, including several garden days at the clinic and cooking classes with Britt Reed, as well as a new class, Seven Skills to Live with Diabetes, where they will go into further detail about diabetes management. 

If you or a loved one is living with diabetes, Miguel and Natasha encourage you to drop by the Diabetes Care and Prevention program at the clinic so they can answer any questions, provide you with resources and set you up with a personalized plan to help manage your diabetes. For further information, please contact the Diabetes program at (360) 716-5642.

Our Healing Journey

By Kalvin Valdillez, Tulalip News

“Who is a problem gambler?” asked Tulalip Problem Gambling Coordinator, Sarah Sense-Wilson. “A problem gambler is anyone whose gambling is causing psychological, financial, emotional, spiritual, relational, legal or other difficulties for themselves and others around them, including family and community.

“Here’s a little data for you,” she continued. “Up to 1-3% of Washingtonians struggle with problem gambling. To get some perspective on that, imagine the Seattle Seahawks stadium filled to capacity four times – that’s the amount of problem gamblers in Washington state. Sadly, only 1 in 10 seek professional help. 92% of problem gamblers experience suicidal ideation at some point in their gambling, up to 40% attempt suicide. That number is too high.” 

Many of us have shared a story about one of our gambling escapades with a close friend or family member. You know the one, it usually begins as a fun night out with good company at a casino and includes plenty of dancing, delicious delectabls and drinks. And if you’re feeling lucky, you might even hit the floor. Whether your poison is table games or the machines, the story can only have one of three outcomes; you win, lose or break even. At times we recall these stories as if they were tales of war, recapping each spin or hand dealt. However, it tends to end along the lines, ‘I was winning and then lost it all. Should’ve left while I was up’, or ‘I won! I got the bonus, five free spins and then hit a bunch wilds’. Because in the moment it’s all fun, it’s as if you become hypnotized by the music and obsessed with obtaining more credits.

For most, gambling is a fun social event. Many set a limit of how much money they will gamble before even stepping into a gaming establishment. That way if they lose, it’s already accounted for. While others can get caught up in the thrill of chasing jackpots, willing to risk it all in hopes of a big payout. Like most vices, gambling is addictive and provides a high. And if you’re a compulsive gambler, you lose the concept of time and reality, only to snap out of it when you’re forced to stop i.e., run out of cash or hit a jackpot. The odds are always against you, but even when you lose, you might feel compelled to ‘win it back’ and visit the nearest ATM.

At each ATM located within a Tulalip Gaming Establishment, a message is provided at the bottom of the screen throughout the entire transaction process. A message that unfortunately goes unread, or is ignored, quite too often. A message for compulsive gamblers from the Tulalip Tribes Problem Gambling program that states, ‘if you or a loved one suffer from a gambling addiction, please contact (360) 716-4440.’

Every March is National Problem Gambling Awareness Month, an initiative that launched fifteen years ago and was inspired largely in part by the mass amount of NCAA March Madness basketball bracket pools. In an effort to raise awareness and to provide support as well as education, the Tulalip Problem Gambling program actively participates in awareness month by hosting a number of events every third month of the year. 

On the evening of March 2, the Tulalip Problem Gambling program kicked off National Problem Gambling Awareness Month at the Hibulb Cultural Center during their 4th Annual Community Gathering night. 

The community gathering is a popular event that welcomes those who are recovering from their addiction, as well as their families. The theme for this year’s event was titled ‘Our Healing Journey’ and the Problem Gambling program offered good medicine throughout the night. The community filled the Hibulb Longhouse, enjoying an evening complete with dinner and entertainment. Master of Ceremony and Tulalip tribal member, Whaa-Ka-Dup Monger opened the event with a prayer before community member Terrance Sabbas led his family in a drum circle, offering a prayer song to the participants.

One of the highlights of the evening came right before dinner as two young Tulalip Youth Council members, Image Enick and Kaiser Moses, offered words of encouragement and a traditional Tulalip song for those healing from problem gambling.

“I’m speaking on behalf of the Youth Council and representing the youth,” said Kaiser. “I’d like to say that we’re all very proud of you for being here and taking a moving step forward. It’s very important. It touches all of our hearts that you care so much and that you’re able to recognize how this affects us. We’re happy and overjoyed to be here with you and we’re really proud and hopeful for your future.”

Tulalip Problem Gambling Coordinator, Sara Sense-Wilson, gives a hug to attendee Charlotte, for sharing her moving story about overcoming her gambling addiction.

Charlotte, who was celebrating three years and six months of her personal healing journey, openly shared her intimate story with the community. In 2015, she was caught embezzling from a non-profit, of which she was the treasurer, to fuel her gambling addiction. She eventually was admitted into a deferment program for her crimes and found herself at the Tulalip Problem Gambling program with Sarah who helped her through the recovery process. Sarah tasked Charlotte with creating a timeline of her gambling problem. When working on her timeline she learned that the addiction stemmed from a year of hardship, in which she lost family members due to cancer and alcoholism, along with a traumatizing event concerning her child. 

“You’ve done everything you can, you’re trying to keep yourself together but your family’s falling apart, your kids are falling apart. So what did I do? I gambled,” admitted Charlotte. “Because at that casino, I checked out. I did not feel; I did not think. I checked out emotionally, physically, mentally. It’s very easy to hide. I’d get up and go to work every day and come home and play mommy, but at nine o’clock every night I was leaving. My excuse was always, I’m just so stressed out and I need to get away.”

Charlotte explained that she made recovery a priority and began learning about her addiction; why she gambled, how it was affecting her and why she was covering it up. Therefore, she learned how to deal with her feelings and work through her adversity. 

“I started learning I could live and not gamble. Wow, I just said that. I can live and not gamble – amazing! I found people who understand my gambling, people I can talk to about it. I’m not hiding it anymore. That’s my recovery. Today, I’m healing.”

The community gathering concluded with a performance by Native comedian Vaughn Eagle Bear whose claim to fame was the song John Wayne’s Teeth which was featured in the Native cult classic, Smoke Signals. After participants finished drying their eyes following Charlotte’s moving testimony, Vaughn made the crowd cry once more, but this time the tears were caused by his hilarious rez humor. 

“This evening we really wanted to highlight and celebrate that whole healing journey, it’s not just the individual or the family, it’s the community,” said Sarah. “This is a disease, it’s an addiction, it’s a problem. At Tulalip Tribes we recognize that and we provide a variety of services to support problem gamblers, their families and the community. Some of those services are family night where we provide education and support, we do individual counseling, referrals to in-patient or other treatment programs, we also do individual assessments. We are one of the most comprehensive tribal-run gambling programs in the entire state of Washington and we’re really proud of that. To me, that reflects the dedication and commitment of the tribe to promote health and wellness throughout both tribal and the local community. Our services are for non-natives too and the fact that Tulalip Tribes is so progressive in providing that support speaks to the value system and the overarching cultural beliefs.”

Problem Gambling will continue to host a number of events throughout National Problem Gambling Awareness month. If you or a loved one suffer from a gambling addiction, please contact the Tulalip Problem Gambling program at (360) 716-4440. 

Mindful Movements: Yoga for Elders

Tulalip elder, Marvin Jones is learning the many health benefits of yoga.

By Kalvin Valdillez, Tulalip News 

Originally introduced to the world centuries ago, the practice of yoga continues to uplift the spirit, sharpen minds and improve the overall health of millions to this day. Whether you’re a beginner practicing stretches such as the downward dog or a master yogi who can easily flow into a firefly pose, you are more than likely experiencing the endless benefits of yoga. Those who practice yoga often see a number of physical and spiritual improvements such as flexibility, anxiety relief, injury recovery, and muscle and bone strength as well as a strong sense of balance of the mind, body and soul.

One of the many great things about yoga is the fact that anybody can take it up, no matter where you’re at in terms of your own personal journey and fitness level.  Over recent decades, the ancient art of exercise, discipline and mediation has become a popular go-to workout as many yoga classes are held throughout various local gyms and available to stream online on platforms such as YouTube and Glo.com. The majority of avid yogis range in age between their early-twenties to mid-forties, however, new studies are encouraging individuals of the older generations to join in on the fun and incorporate a little yoga and meditation routine into their daily lives. 

“Yoga’s such a good experience. Most people are scared to try something new, but I can guarantee if you try this, you will probably like it – a lot,” expressed Tulalip elder, Marvin Jones. “I did yoga once and now I think everybody should try it out. When we get up there in age, we need to do something, some form of exercise. This could prolong your life because it gets you moving and it’s better than just sitting around watching TV. You can do it at home, you can do it anywhere.”

Marvin is the first student of a new program called Mindful Movements brought to Tulalip by the SNAP-Ed and the Diabetes Care and Prevention programs. On the morning of February 19, Marvin sat in a circle and carefully followed the instruction of Autumn Walker, Diabetes Care and Prevention volunteer, who guided the class through an hour long yoga session. Autumn encouraged Marvin to try new poses but also to know his own personal limits as they focused their attention on breathing techniques and gentle stretches. 

“The intention teaching this class is to provide a space where people can take care of themselves and have some thoughtful reflections on what works for them, both with their mind and with their body,” Autumn explained. “There’s a lot of benefits to yoga and meditation. A lot of our lives are filled and busy, so setting aside some time where we can be quiet and focus on our wellness is beneficial. We can really find some movement and warmth with the stretching of the muscles, which can ease any pain people have with their joints and really facilitate flexibility of joints over time. If these motions and activities are practiced regularly, they can promote good circulation as well as the healing and wellness of the joints and muscles of the body.”

The first of many gatherings, Mindful Movements is held every Tuesday and is catered to the local elders of the community. Throughout the majority of the class, the students are in a seated position as they delicately flow through each pose for a relaxing exercise. A visible smile that seemed to indicate relaxation and ease grew wider and spread across Marvin’s face the further the class progressed. 

“I liked sitting in the chair, I found it a lot easier,” he said. “It’s great for people that can’t stand too long. My left leg is weaker and sometimes I can stand long periods and other times I can’t. If I can sit down and do it, it makes it a whole lot easier because I know I won’t fall. Today I was able to work on my neck, back and shoulders – that’s my main concern because I have weak shoulders. I noticed I got a little sore but that’s a good thing. It goes away after a little bit and you’ll get used to it because exercise helps make you stronger.”

According to many experienced yogis, yoga is absolutely safe for the older generations. Not only does yoga help elders with balance, mobility, heart health and strengthen the respiratory system and blood circulation, it can also relieve stress, inflammation and pain as well as lower blood sugar levels for those living with diabetes. 

After experiencing the benefits of yoga at a few of the Diabetes Care and Prevention Garden Day events, the elders began requesting a class of their own at the Senior Center. SNAP-Ed and the Diabetes program recruited Autumn, who also led the Garden Day sessions, to teach the initial classes of Mindful Movements. After a few months, Autumn will pass the baton to SNAP-Ed Nutritionist AnneCherise Jensen who will take over instructing duties. Originally scheduled to start at the beginning of February, Mindful Movements grew a lot of anticipation from local elders but unfortunately due to the recent snow storms, the first two classes were canceled. AnneCherise extends a friendly reminder that the classes are still occurring and invites the community to participate. 

“The elders inspired us as well as the whole aspect of wellness,” AnneCherise stated. “So bring your aunties, grandparents, anybody who is looking for a spark of motivation to stay active and feel good. We welcome everybody. It’s suitable for all fitness levels and ages. If you have any injuries or disabilities, we’re able to work around it, we work with everybody’s needs.”

Autumn adds, “We really want the class to be accessible for everybody to come and participate in the parts that work for them and to leave feeling refreshed and rejuvenated as well as with a new curiosity about how their bodies operate and what they’re able to do with them. They can take some of these stretching exercises home and incorporate them into their everyday lives. We want people to leave feeling empowered, like yes, I can participate in this program that’s good for my wellness and yes, I found some physical activities that work for me.”

Mindful Movements is held every Tuesday at the Dining Hall between 9:00 a.m. and 10:00 a.m. For further details, please contact SNAP-Ed at (360) 716-5632 or the Diabetes program at (360) 716-5642.

Important Message Regarding Measles

Source: Tulalip Community Health Department

On January 25th, 2019 Gov. Jay Inslee declared a state of emergency in response to the current measles outbreak connected to Clark Co. As of January 29, 2019 there have not been any lab confirmed cases of measles in Snohomish Co., connected to this outbreak.

Measles is very contagious, and spreads quickly. Measles is so contagious that if one person has it, 90% of the people close to that person who are not immune (have not received the vaccine) will also become infected.1

The best way to prevent the spread of measles and protect yourself and loved ones is to make sure you are up to date on all immunizations, including the Measles, Mumps, Rubella (MMR) vaccine.

Almost all of the cases linked to the outbreak are in people who are not immunized against measles. Children are especially at risk because they generally do not receive their first dose of the MMR vaccine until their first birthday.

The Tulalip Health System is highly encouraging everyone to make sure they are up to date on their immunizations. The Tulalip Health Clinic has the MMR vaccine available. Most insurance plans cover the cost of the vaccine.

What is measles?

Measles is a highly contagious and potentially serious illness caused by a virus.

What are the symptoms ofmeasles?

A high fever, cough, runny nose and red eyes, followed by a rash that usually begins at the head and spreads to the rest of the body.

How serious is measles?

Measles can be serious for all ages. However, children younger than 5 years and adults older than 20 years are more likely to suffer from measles complications including ear infection, pneumonia and diarrhea. As many as one out of every 20 children with measles gets pneumonia, the most common cause of death from measles in young children. About one child out of every 1,000 who get measles will develop encephalitis (swelling of the brain) that can lead to convulsions and can leave the child deaf or with intellectual disability. Measles may cause pregnant women to give birth prematurely or to have a low-birth-weight baby.

How do you get measles?

Measles is spread through the air after a person with measles coughs or sneezes. The virus can linger in the air for up to two hours after someone who is infectious has left. A person can spread the virus before they show symptoms. People are contagious (able to spread measles) for up to four days before and up to four days after the rash appears. After someone is exposed to measles, illness develops in about one to three weeks

How can you prevent measles?

Immunization is the best prevention for measles. The measles vaccine is very effective.

If you have and questions or concerns give Community Health a call at 360-716-5662.

 

Skincare with Sheniece

By Kalvin Valdillez, Tulalip News 

Tulalip tribal member, Sheniece Lane, found her passion at a young age while working at the Tulalip Resort Casino. After years of working in the Guest Service department, she decided on a new venture with the luxurious 14,000 square-foot T Spa. During her tenure there she gravitated toward an array of products such as toners, serums and moisturizers, learning how certain skincare products are catered to specific skin types. 

With an established interest in beauty cosmetics, including makeup and lashes, as well as self-care, Sheniece found her true calling as an esthetician while in a managerial position at the spa. This allowed her to gain as much product knowledge as possible and experience a number of services including facials and waxes. During her early days at the spa, Sheniece could usually be spotted on the retail floor with a box of exfoliator in one hand and an eye-cream in the other, carefully studying the ingredients to get an understanding of what the products did and who they were made for. Sheniece would also often pick-the-brains of the T Spa estheticians, inquiring about which masks and peels were best for particular individuals, whether they were dealing with acne, wrinkles or rosacea. 

After months of learning, she pursued an esthetician license by enrolling in a beauty academy. Now a couple years down the road and after many exciting life events, including a baby and a recent engagement, Sheniece is a highly-recommended esthetician at the place where it all began, the T Spa, and she’s ready to help her community learn about their skincare needs.

Lets begin with your personal skincare journey. What made you decide to become an esthetician?

Working at the casino offered a lot of different opportunities for me. One of the top roles I had was working at the T Spa. The environment was so supportive of where I wanted to go with skincare; it was informative. I was able to grow and learn about the skincare industry and how to sell products. Having all that product knowledge really opened my eyes to the benefits of skincare and made me want to educate other people in the same sense. That was the number one reason that made me want to pursue my esthetician license and career. 

Skincare is something that is often overlooked, why do you believe taking good care of your skin is important?

Our skin is the largest organ of our body. It’s also the largest barrier against infection. If we have cuts and are not taking good care of our skin, we’re exposing ourselves to infections, toxins or environmental factors. It’s really important to maintain a proper daily skincare regimen that’s going to help prevent any early signs of aging and wrinkles. The overall goal is to continue to provide a strong barrier for your skin because that’s how we stay away from getting sick or any illnesses.

For those who are new to skincare, it might be surprising to learn that certain products are geared toward specific skin types. What are the different types of skin?

I can go into huge detail about that, but I’m going to try to summarize it; a lot of people have normal skin. There’s normal skin, dry skin, couperose skin, mature skin and oily skin.

People with normal skin typically have smaller pores; they have a really good firm muscle texture to their skin. They’re going to be rosy around the cheeks and they have really good smooth texture on their skin. No pigmentations or lesions because they have an ideal skin type.

Dry skin is obviously going to be lacking circulation. 

Couperose skin are people who have telangiectasia or rosacea, so they either have dilated capillaries like red veins or their skin looks flushed and red.

Mature and acneic skin are self-explanatory. While people with oily skin types have more thick skin and a little bit of texture to their skin. 

How would one assess their skin type?

If someone is breaking out quite a bit, I’d recommend seeing a dermatologist because it’s usually due to an allergy. 

I also advise people to come and get a skin consultation with an esthetician at the T Spa. It’s better to do it in person because it’s easy to self-diagnose ourselves, but most of the time we’re wrong. If someone has questions, everyone is really helpful and if they’re looking for a product we can suggest that for them really quickly.  

What kind of skincare treatments do you offer at the T Spa?

The primary treatment I’m doing at the spa is the European facial. It’s essentially a customized skincare facial that’s super relaxing and educational for the client. I ask if they have any concerns, and most people don’t have any they just want to come in for the relaxation portion of it, but some people will come in and say they have clogged pores, hyperpigmentation – which is also known as dark spots that’s from an overextended period of time of sun exposure – or they have acne problems. I customize any of the products we have to target those skin concerns. What’s most important is educating my clients to use the proper skincare line. If you were to come in and say, I’m breaking out and I want to get rid of this, I’d suggest some products to you that would fit specifically towards your needs.

Another great facial to book is definitely the T Spa signature facial. That’s a good way to figure out if you wanted to do further anti-aging treatments or peels. If you wanted to get a regimen going at home, we can target what your skin needs at that time.

Lets talk about establishing an at home regimen. What skincare products are essential? 

The biggest thing people need to do is exfoliate and the reason I say that is because our skin layers are always shedding every day. When we’re not exfoliating we get buildup of oils, dirt and debris. What you want to do is exfoliate two times a week at a minimum, three time at the most. That helps bring circulation to the skin, it helps slough off your skin so you have supple, texture-free skin. 

Serum’s are important too because they have anti-oxidants. Antioxidants help detoxify and create a barrier against the elements. You ideally want to have a moisturizer on, because it’s cold out now and that takes away the moisture from our skin. Use that serum under a moisturizer to help prevent dehydration in the skin, combat signs of early aging and hyperpigmentation. 

And also any moisturizing cream that you like to use. Those three things I feel are a great start for people because most people claim to just use a bar of soap while in the shower and that’s it. Oh, and an eye-cream too! Because that’s another place where we start to show early signs of aging. 

What are your top three favorite products?

Monoi H Corrective Exfoliating cleanser. It’s my number one product I recommend to people. It’s gentle enough to exfoliate your skin but it’s still hydrating, it’s not going to strip your skin of any of its oils.

My next product I like is a Rose Hips Seed Triple C and E Firming serum. Vitamin C and E are really good for your skin because it helps maintain your moisture and hydration levels, it helps fight free radicals, wrinkle prevention and targets dark spots. It’s really like an all-in-one serum and that’s something I tell people to use under their moisturizer.

My third favorite is Bearberry Eye-Cream by Eminence because it helps target pigmentation under the eyes as well as inflammation and puffiness. And also their Artic Berry Peptide Illuminating Cream, that helps with uneven complexion and it looks like your skin is glowing.

What are the products to stay away from?

Stay away from St. Ives mango scrub or apricot scrub. Those microbeads are so bad for your skin. You don’t want those big beads tearing away your skin because that opens your skin to bacteria. And when you’re opening your skin to be that susceptible, then you’re getting more breakouts. They’ve been a little more proactive about not using microbeads in products anymore because it’s harmful for fish, sea life and the creatures of the ocean. 

And I don’t want to bash them, but I don’t encourage people to use Proactive. Their products were found bleaching people’s washcloths. So for the product to be that potent, those ingredients are not safe for people’s skin, especially those with acne. The biggest misconception people have is when they get a breakout, they immediately think they have acneic skin, and no, you’re having a breakout. The biggest contributors to breakouts are diet and stress. Stress plays a huge role, so it’s important to incorporate meditating, disconnecting or journaling because there’s so many ways our bodies communicate with us and that shows up as acne.

You mentioned diet playing a role in our skin health, can you expand a little more?

Most people typically are eating an inflammatory diet. The best thing for your skin is to always stay hydrated. Try to drink at least eight, 8oz glasses of water a day and carry a water bottle with you. Hold yourself accountable to staying hydrated because what that’s doing is completely detoxifying our system. Try to eat non-processed foods, anything that comes in a package. Try to eat wholefully, like vegetables and fruits. Fish is really good for our skin because of those omega-3’s, that helps oil production and collagen production, which helps keep us looking younger and our skin glowing. 

So our ancestors knew what they were doing?

They really did! I think that speaks for itself because a lot of our Native elders don’t have really bad wrinkles, they look youthful.

Any tips on staying consistent with your daily skincare regimen?

I struggle with that too, don’t get me wrong. Sometimes if I’m not wearing makeup during the day, I’ll want to skip it. Which is okay. If you’re a guy or not a frequent makeup wearer, it’s still important to incorporate some type of toner at the end of the day because if you’re around any dust or dirt, that’s still holding onto your skin.

The best advice I have to staying disciplined is before you get into bed, go to the bathroom, wash your face after you brush your teeth and make it a routine. It’s important to remember that when you’re sleeping, your skin is regenerating.  I skipped out a couple of times. I just got over a bad breakout, I wasn’t cleaning my skin and was eating terrible, and it was showing. I didn’t want to do anything, I was hiding away and wearing hats. It affects your self-esteem when your skin isn’t doing good. If you think about it, you’re taking care of yourself; it’s great self-care. And you’re setting yourself up for success for the next day, because for me, when I wake up in the morning and see that my skin looks really good, that sets the tone for the rest of my day to perform at my peak. 

 

Sheniece is currently working weekends at the T Spa and encourages anyone with skincare questions to visit. To book a facial or skin consultation, please contact the spa at (360) 716-6350. Sheniece is also working to expand her brand, recently investing in an organic skincare line named Beauty Counter, that avoids using several harmful ingredients that are banned in countries other than the U.S. She will also be hosting a number of pop-ups throughout the Tulalip reservation, using the new product line to conduct skin evaluations and mini-facials. 

“I hope that I’m able to reach anybody in the community who wants more skincare product and knowledge,” she says. “I’m making myself more accessible to the community so I can offer what I learned and pass that on to people that have no idea where to begin with skincare.”

Be sure to follow Sheniece’s Instagram page, @sol.beauty, to stay updated on her latest skincare and beauty news, as well on any upcoming pop-ups with her new Beauty Counter skincare line.

Increase in Flu Activity

Public Health Message – Increase in Flu Activity

Snohomish County recently reported its first death from the flu this season, an elderly women from Marysville. Hospitalizations from flu related illnesses are also starting to increase in Snohomish County. It is not too late to get a flu shot to protect yourself and loves ones from this potentially life threatening illness.  Flu season tends to peak between now and March.

The flu is a contagious respiratory illness caused by influenza viruses that infect the nose, throat, and lungs. It can cause mild to severe illness. At times, it can lead to death. Everyone 6 months and older should get a flu vaccine. 

All Native Americans are considered HIGH risk for developing complications from the flu.

Protect Not Only Yourself but Also Your Loved Ones

Pneumonia and flu are a leading cause of death among Native elders. The flu can cause certain health conditions, including diabetes, asthma, and heart and lung disease, to become worse. Pneumonia and bronchitis are examples of serious flu-related complications, which can result in hospitalization and sometimes even death.

Signs And Symtoms fo The Flu

People sick with the flu can feel some or all of these symptoms:

  • Fever* or feeling feverish/ chills
  •  Cough
  • Sore throat
  • Runny or stuffy nose
  • Muscle or body aches
  • Headaches
  • Fatigue (very tired)
  •  Some people may have vomiting and diarrhea, though this is more common in children than adults.

*Not everyone with the flu will have a fever. You can be sick and contagious without running a temperature.

 

Help Prevent the Spread of Flu

  • Get a flu vaccine each year.
  • Cover your coughs and sneezes
  • Wash your hands often
  • Take antiviral drugs if they are prescribed for you.
  •  If you’re sick, stay home

Flu shots are available and are FREE for all Tribal Members and those with HMA Insurance

Please call the KIF Health Clinic at 360-716-4511 to schedule your flu shot. For more information call the Community Health Department at 360-716-5662.

Accomplishing New Year goals with SNAP-Ed’s AnneCherise Jensen

By Kalvin Valdillez, Tulalip News 

Tulalip Tribes SNAP-Ed Nutritionist, AnneCherise Jensen

As we welcome a new year, many of us look to begin anew. Whether it’s reading more, meeting new people, learning a foreign language or picking up a hobby, people across the globe look at the start of the new calendar year as an opportunity to work on themselves. One of the most common goals individuals set is bettering their overall health, which includes creating healthier eating habits and incorporating exercise into their daily routines. Although we begin each year with our best intentions, after the motivational ‘new year, new me’ phrase loses its luster a few weeks down the road, we tend to slip back into our old ways and think, ‘meh, maybe next year’. One of the many challenges people face when setting resolutions is sticking to them. 

The Tulalip Health Clinic offers a variety of programs and classes throughout the year in which community members can participate to help stay true along their health journey. Programs like Diabetes Prevention and Care offers cooking and gardening classes, encouraging citizens to grow their own produce and prepare their own meals to limit sugar and sodium intake. The Eat Smart, Be Healthy course, offered by the Tulalip SNAP-ED program, teaches about the nutritional value of food as well as how to budget, shop and prepare tasty meals to enjoy at home. SNAP-Ed Nutritionist, AnneCherise Jensen recently sat down with Tulalip News to offer ideas and tips on how community members can set and accomplish their New Year goals for 2019.

Its a new year. A lot of people are beginning their health and fitness journey, any tips for those just getting started?

What I usually recommend for people who are starting out their new year is to set realistic expectations and set small feasible goals that will eventually lead up to big goals. If their goals are to reverse diabetes or lose weight, it’s good to meet with professionals to set small realistic goals by changing your lifestyle in order to get there. 

People like to work on their physique this time of year, what are a few recommendations for getting back into shape? 

Getting at least thirty minutes of exercise a day, that’s a really great way to do it. I know many people don’t have access to gyms. One recommendation I like to give is find what you like to do, whether it’s Zumba, yoga, fitness or weight training, and just watch YouTube videos. YouTube is a really easy way to have a gym at your house without having to go somewhere,you can have your own space and privacy. It’s a lot about lifestyle changes and mostly exercise and slowly modifying your diet. 

What are the benefits of exercise and why is important for our bodies?

Muscle is the organ of longevity. The more muscles we have, the longer our bodies are going to stay physically strong and active. Really focusing on, not getting buff or anything, but just maintaining healthy muscle mass is important. Muscles are one of our main calorie burning sources, having more muscle keeps us thriving for a longer period of time, prevents osteoporosis and overall exercise keeps our bodies active for more years in our life. I recommend trying to increase muscle mass, even if it’s just with small weights. 

Other benefits of exercise are it helps with depression and anxiety. It gets rid of all the toxins in our body. We all probably have a diet high in sugar and caffeine, some of us smoke cigarettes or drink. That stuff can last in our bodies for a couple of weeks, and if we continue to put those toxins into our bodies, overtime it can damage our DNA synthesis. They’re carcinogens and if we don’t flush those out of our system every now and again it could eventually lead to cancer. It’s always good to have phases in our lives where we eliminate those from our body and we include more exercise and more water because it does give us more mental clarity, it helps with our emotions and our moods and it helps make our bones stronger so we don’t have osteoporosis later on in life. I consider daily exercise our daily form of medicine because it does so many things to our body; it’s good for the mind, body and soul.

You mentioned water. Can you talk about the significance of staying hydrated and ways to increase your daily water intake?

At our house we always have a big glass of water in the morning and one before we go to bed. I encourage myself to have a glass with every meal. It can be a little challenging because today, we have all these fun drinks and nobody wants to drink water. But water is chemically one of the most unique compounds because it’s comprised of hydrogen and oxygen and it could dilute or dissolve more compounds than any other acid in the world. It really helps keep our organs healthy, because if our organs are dehydrated and our brain is dehydrated, we don’t absorb our food as well, we don’t digest our food as well. Drinking water helps increase our metabolism and also helps flush out any toxins in our body. If you’re looking to get into yoga, water helps with flexibility. Water helps a lot with gaining muscle, you can’t gain muscle unless you’re fully hydrated. 

In the winter months where we have a tendency to get sick, water is good to keep our immune system going, keep the white blood cell count high and get rid of bacteria and viruses. Including fruits and berries into your water is a great way to add more flavor and more phytochemicals to help fight off those diseases and bacteria. If you have a hard time drinking water, what I like to do is drink ice with La Croix or some kind of sparkling water, that helps, especially if you’re a pop drinker. If you replace one glass of soda a day with water, it’s going to help with your mental clarity, weight and overall biochemistry.

Any advice on where to start for those who are looking to switch up their diet and make healthier eating choices?

Make breakfast your most important meal of the day because that’s what kick starts your metabolism. Try to focus on three meals a day with snacks in between. It can be overwhelming because there are a lot of diet crazes out there. What I recommend for people who may feel overwhelmed with nutritional information is stick to whole foods. If the food you’re eating was around 100 years ago, it’s probably good for you. 

You really want to step away from the processed foods and fast foods. I call them sometimes foods, where you only have them on occasion instead of a daily basis. Also using herbs and spices and the natural foods found out here on the reservation like nettles. Using what you have available for flavor instead of salt and sugar can help against diabetes and hypertension, which are two of the major killers in the United States.

Meal prepping is really big right now. What are your thoughts on meal prep? Is there any downside?

The weeks when I meal prep, my week goes by much smoother. I spend a lot less time thinking about what I’m going to eat, I save money and it decreases the chances of me going through a drive-through. Because you have a guaranteed meal, you don’t have to worry about what you’re going to eat. Many prepare all their food for the week on Sunday, the downside to that is the meals can get boring. What I like to do is make a few meals on Sunday and then again on Wednesday to add a little variety.  There are a lot of health benefits to meal prepping, you just have to stay consistent. It might be a little hard and challenging but it’s developing a habit that will lead to positive change.

Tulalip SNAP-Ed is gearing up for a big year, hosting several new classes including Mindful Movements, a yoga class offered to elders at the Senior Center on Tuesdays in February; the Food Smart class, similar to the Eat Smart, Be Healthy course but less intensive. SNAP-Ed will also continue their fan favorite programs this year like the Walking Club, Family YMCA Nights and of course the Eat Smart, Be Healthy course. For further details, please contact SNAP-Ed at (360) 716-5632.

 

Healthy Fruit Smoothies

  • Pick a Fruit: Frozen Mixed Berries, Mango, Pineapple, Peaches, Kiwi, Strawberries, Blueberries, Bananas, Pears, Grapes
  • Add Some Greens: Spinach, Kale, Avocados, Chard, Mixed Baby Greens, sprouts
  • Choose a Base: Milk, Almond Milk, Soy Milk, Low Sugar Fruit Juices, 
  • Coconut Water, Water, Coffee, Iced Green Tea 
  • Thicken It Up: Greek Yogurt, Peanut Butter, Almond Butter, Cottage Cheese, Coconut, Oats, Ice Cubes
  • Power Boost: Protein Powder (casein, whey, vegetable), Ground Flax Seeds, Chia Seeds, Fish Oil, Vitamin Powder, Probiotics, Bee Pollen, Wheatgrass, 
  • Flavor Savors: Cinnamon, Honey, Coco Powder, Nutmeg, Vanilla Extract, Ginger

Creamy Raspberry Coconut Smoothie  

  • 1 cup almond milk 
  • 1 cup fresh raspberries 
  • Zest and juice of 1/2 lemon 
  • 2 tablespoons shredded coconut 
  • ¼ cup raw cashews 
  • 3-4 ice cubes 

Berry Banana Oat Smoothie 

  • 1 banana
  • 1/4 cup gluten-free oats
  • 2 cups frozen mixed berries
  • 1 cup light coconut milk or low fat milk. 
  • 1 Tbsp. Peanut Butter 
  • 1 tsp. ground flax seeds 
  • 1 scoop protein powder 

Spinach Pineapple Green Smoothie

  • 2/3 cup low-fat vanilla Greek yogurt
  • 1 banana
  • 1 cup pineapple
  • 1 cup fresh baby spinach, packed
  • ¼-1/2 cup coconut water or low fat milk
  • 3-4 cubes ice 
  • 1 Scoop Vitamin Powder 

January is Stalking Awareness Month

Submitted by Sydney Gilbert, Tulalip Tribes Child Advocacy Center

This January marks the 15th annual National Stalking Awareness Month. Though millions of men and women are stalked every year in the United States, the crime of stalking is often misunderstood, minimized and/or ignored. 

Stalking is a pattern of behavior directed at a specific person that causes fear. Many stalking victims experience being followed, approached and/or threatened – including through technology. Stalking is a terrifying and psychologically harmful crime in its own right as well as a predictor of serious violence.

  In 85% of cases where an intimate partner (i.e., boyfriend/girlfriend or husband/wife) attempted to murder his partner, stalking preceded the attack. We all have a role to play in identifying stalking and supporting victims and survivors.

If you would like to learn about other ways to help support victims and survivors, visit www.stalkingawareness.org.