Second Appraisal Day at Hibulb a success

Brill Lee an accredited member of the International Society of Appraisers, appraises a basket brought in by Tulalip citizen Lois Landgrebe, during the Hibulb Appraisal Day on May 3. Photo/ Brandi N. Montreuil, Tulalip News

Brill Lee an accredited member of the International Society of Appraisers, appraises a basket brought in by Tulalip citizen Lois Landgrebe, during the Hibulb Appraisal Day on May 3.
Photo/ Brandi N. Montreuil, Tulalip News

By Brandi N. Montreuil, Tulalip News

TULALIP – It was basket extravaganza at the second Hibulb Appraisal Day on Saturday, May 3, when the center welcomed Brill Lee, an accredited member of the International Society of Appraisers and independent appraiser, for the second time.

Almost a dozen guests attended the event, bringing more than a dozen items to be appraised. Items, unlike the first Hibulb Appraisal Day, were mainly baskets made by local Native American artists and Alaska Native weavers.  The baskets displayed a wealth of weaving skill and tribal history.

Brill Lee examines a basket brought in by a tribal fisherman. The basekt-like structure was rescued from the Nooksack River and features weaving patterns and materials no indigenous to this area. Photo/ Brandi N. Montreuil, Tulalip News

Brill Lee examines a basket brought in by a tribal fisherman. The basekt-like structure was rescued from the Nooksack River and features weaving patterns and materials no indigenous to this area.
Photo/ Brandi N. Montreuil, Tulalip News

The surprise of the day was a basket-like item rescued from the Nooksack River by a tribal fisherman. The basket featured weaving patterns and material not indigenous to this area and was referred to the Seattle Burke Museum for further study.

The center was gifted a pair of leather beaded gauntlet gloves, donated by guest Troy Jones. The gloves were a trade item in 1930 to a service station in Granite Falls for work completed on a vehicle. The gloves have been in his family since the trade. Lee appraised the item at $3,000 to $3,500 due to the current market value, condition, material used, and artist skill.

Troy-Jones-gauntlet-gloves

A pair of leather beaded gantlet gloves, commonly used in rodeos, were donated by guest Troy Jones. The gloves are appraised at $3,000 to $3,500 due to current market value, condition, material used, and artist skill.
Photo/ Brandi N. Montreuil, Tulalip News

Combined value of items appraised during event totaled more than $8,600.

If you are interested in having an item appraised, you can check out Brill Lee’s website at www.brillleeappraisals.com or by telephone at 425-885-4518. For more information about events happening at Hibulb or the next Hibulb Appraisal Day, please visit their website at www.hibulbculturalcenter.org.

 

Brandi N. Montreuil:360-913-5402; bmontreuil@tulaliptribes-nsn.gov

 

A basket featuring the "rolling logs" pattern, which is sometimes confused with a swastika, was brought in by Bothell resident, Jim Freese to the May 3, Hibulb Appraisal Day. The unique weaving and emblem was considered good luck and used in the early 1900s. The basket was appraised at $125- $175. Photo/ Brandi N. Montreuil, Tulalip News

A basket featuring the “rolling logs” pattern, which is sometimes confused with a swastika, was brought in by Bothell resident, Jim Freese to the May 3, Hibulb Appraisal Day. The unique weaving and emblem was considered good luck and used in the early 1900s. The basket was appraised at $125- $175.
Photo/ Brandi N. Montreuil, Tulalip News

 

Snohomish resident, Bart Marzolf, brought in a sign that hung over a main road entering the town of Snohomish in 1920. the carving features a fish similiar to a salmon and features a clam shell pearl for the fish's eye. The carver is unknown and the item was valued over $1,000. Photo/ Brandi N. Montreuil, Tulalip News

Snohomish resident, Bart Marzolf, brought in a sign that hung over a main road entering the town of Snohomish in 1920. The carving features a fish similar to a salmon and features a clam shell pearl for the fish’s eye. The carver is unknown and the item was valued over $1,000.
Photo/ Brandi N. Montreuil, Tulalip News

 

Jim Freese learns how his parents' basket collection demonstrates a wealth of weaving skill and tribal history from tribes located in Washington. One of the baskets was appraised at $1,000 for its rarity.Photo/ Brandi N. Montreuil, Tulalip News

Jim Freese learns how his parents’ basket collection demonstrates a wealth of weaving skill and tribal history from tribes located in Washington. One of the baskets was appraised at $1,000 for its rarity.
Photo/ Brandi N. Montreuil, Tulalip News