Tribal leaders, Commissioner warn of oil train dangers

Washington’s people and environment potentially at risk

Press Release: Washington State Department of Natural Resources

OLYMPIA – Increased oil train traffic on Washington’s aging rail system puts the state’s people and ecosystems at risk, according to an opinion piece by ten tribal leaders and the Washington State Commissioner of Public Lands Peter Goldmark, published today in the Seattle Times.

“Crude By Rail: Too Much, Too Soon” calls for federal regulators to improve safety protocols and equipment standards on Washington rail lines to deal with a forty-fold increase in oil train traffic since 2008. Trains carrying crude oil are highly combustible and, if derailed, present serious threats to public safety and environmental health.

Tim Ballew II, chairman of the Lummi Nation; Jim Boyd, chairman of the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; Brian “Spee~Pots” Cladoosby, chairman of the Swinomish Indian Tribal Community; William B. Iyall, chairman of the Cowlitz Indian Tribe; Maria Lopez, chairwoman of the Hoh Indian Tribe; David Lopeman, chairman of the Squaxin Island Tribe; Fawn Sharp, president of the Quinault Indian Nation; Charles Woodruff, chairman of the Quileute Tribe; Herman Williams Sr., chairman of the Tulalip Tribes; and Gary Burke, chairman of the Board of Trustees of the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation joined Commissioner Goldmark in urging policymakers to address critical issues around the increase of oil train traffic through the state.

“The Northwest has suffered from a pollution-based economy,” said Cladoosby in a statement. “We are the first peoples of this great region, and it is our responsibility to ensure that our ancestral fishing, hunting and gathering grounds are not reduced to a glorified highway for industry. Our great teacher, Billy Frank, Jr., taught us that we are the voices of the Salish Sea and salmon, and we must speak to protect them. If we cannot restore the health of the region from past and present pollution, how can we possibly think we can restore and pay for the impact of this new and unknown resource?

“We are invested in a healthy economy, but not an economy that will destroy our way of life. We will not profit from this new industry, but rather, we as citizens of the Northwest will pay, one way or another, for the mess it will leave behind in our backyard. We will stand with Commissioner Goldmark and our fellow citizens and do what we need so those who call this great state home will live a healthy, safe and prosperous life,” said Cladoosby.

“Good public policy demands that we make informed decisions using information based on the best science and perspective that must include cultural values and traditional knowledge,” said Quinault President Fawn Sharp. According to her statement, the Quinault Tribe is leading a movement against three oil terminals in Grays Harbor and most recently joined more than 700 Washington state citizens to testify at an October hearing held by the Department of Ecology.

“The Quinault are national leaders of long-standing in natural resources protection and strive to protect the oceans and waterways across the Northwest,” said Sharp.

For Tulalip Chairman Herman Williams, Sr., endangerment of fish runs by oil train pollution is a key concern.

“For generations we have witnessed the destruction of our way of life, our fishing areas, and the resources we hold dear,” said Williams in a statement. “The Boldt decision very clearly interpreted the 1855 Treaty of Point Elliott to reserve 50 percent of the salmon and management to the tribes. The federal government must now partner with tribes to protect the 50 percent of what remains of our fishing rights. The Tulalip Tribes will not allow our children’s future to be taken away for a dollar today. Our treaty rights are not for sale,” said Williams.

According to Commissioner Goldmark, tribal leadership on the oil train issue is essential.

“Tribal leaders bring unique perspective and concern about threats to our treasured landscapes,” said Goldmark. “It’s an honor to join them in this important message about the growth of oil train traffic in our state and the threat it poses to public safety, environmental sustainability, and our quality of life.”

Tulalip Tribal Council swears in new leadership: Newly elected chairman Herman Williams Sr. wastes no time establishing his plans

Newly Elected Chairman of the Tulalip Tribes, Herman Williams, accepting his place on council.

Newly Elected Chairman of the Tulalip Tribes, Herman Williams, accepting his place on council. Andrew Gobin/Tulalip News

By Andrew Gobin, Tulalip News

The Tulalip Tribal Council swore in three members on Saturday, April 5 at the Tulalip Administration board room, welcoming newly elected Les Parks and Herman Williams Sr., and returning Councilman Glen Gobin. Parks and Williams have both served on the council in prior years, which may have contributed to their winning of two seats, and the appointment of Williams as Chair and the election of Parks as Vice Chair. Glen Gobin was elected as Treasurer.

Chairman Williams spoke directly, so not to waste time, mapping out his plans for changing the direction of the Tulalip Tribes, urging for tradition and culture to be the foundation of our community, once more.

Herman Williams Sr. Andrew Gobin/Tulalip News

Herman Williams Sr. Andrew Gobin/Tulalip News

He said, “If we continue as we are, neglecting our culture and traditional ways, the man from Washington D.C. will come here and there will be no Tulalips. Without culture, Tulalip is gone.”

Williams spoke briefly about returning to the old ways of leadership, mentioning the influence of past leaders over his life and leadership.

“All these ones here behind me,” he said, motioning to the photos of all the past councilmembers, “I walked with them all in my lifetime. I may be the only one [on the council] who has had that privilege.”

The Tulalip people are a big concern as well for the new Chairman. He briefly mentioned the social dysfunction a substance abuse that plagues the Tulalip people today.

“We have our people, and we have our strength. But we have to walk together, once more. We have a lot of children born into this life of ours that have been caught in this web of drugs and alcohol. I’m gonna get this community together to take care of that. You women, you are the givers of life. But I understand that some of you are bringing children into this world that are going to have a tough time. I can’t allow that any longer. We will have to march down that road together if we want to heal,” he said.

Les Parks accepts his seat on the Tulalip Tribal Council, also honoring Herman Williams Sr. as the Chair. Andrew Gobin/Tulalip news

Les Parks accepts his seat on the Tulalip Tribal Council, also honoring Herman Williams Sr. as the Chair. Andrew Gobin/Tulalip News

Les Parks, elected Vice Chair for the Tulalip Tribal Council, spoke, thanking the people for their support. He praised Chairman Williams for his leadership and experience, stating how honored he was to serve with him, and the rest of the council.

Glen Gobin, elected Treasurer, echoed Parks’ sentiments, honoring Williams for his past leadership and his status as the elder councilman. Gobin, who was re-elected for a fourth consecutive term, welcomed Williams and Parks back to the council after years of absence.

Gobin accepts re-election and welcomes Williams and Parks to the Tulalip Tribal Council, acknowledging Williams as the Elder on the council. Upon the announcement of the election results, Gobin nominated Williams for the Chairman,who took the position unchallenged. Andrew Gobin/Tulalip News

Gobin accepts re-election and welcomes Williams and Parks to the Tulalip Tribal Council, acknowledging Williams as the Elder on the council. Upon the announcement of the election results, Gobin nominated Williams for the Chairman,who took the position unchallenged. Andrew Gobin/Tulalip News

 

Andrew Gobin is a reporter with the See-Yaht-Sub, a publication of the Tulalip Tribes Communications Department.
Email: agobin@tulaliptribes-nsn.gov
Phone: (360) 716.4188

Live broadcast of leadership swearing in connects Tulalip tribal members across the globe

Photo/ Brandi N. Montreuil, Tulalip News

Photo/ Brandi N. Montreuil, Tulalip News

By Brandi N. Montreuil, Tulalip News

TULALIP – Tulalip TV performed a mock video set up yesterday morning in the Tulalip Tribes Board Room to work out any kinks before the first live airing of Tulalip leadership being sworn in.

While live broadcast isn’t new to Tulalip TV, a live broadcast of a swearing in ceremony of Tulalip Board members is.

Tomorrow’s first regular board meeting of the month will mark the change in leadership for Tulalip Tribes. Herman Williams Sr. and Les Parks will replace Mel Sheldon Jr. and Chuck James. Per the Tulalip Constitution, newly elected Board of Directors are to be installed during the first regular board meeting following the election, which is held on the first Saturday of each month.

Photo/ Brandi N. Montreuil, Tulalip News

Photo/ Brandi N. Montreuil, Tulalip News

Although the first regular board meeting is open to all Tulalip tribal members, not everyone is able to attend due to prior engagements, limited space in the Tulalip Board Room, or other circumstances.

The live broadcast will reach nearly 1,400 Tulalip tribal members who live off reservation, and around the world.

In addition to live streaming at www.tulaliptv.com, the broadcast will be aired lived on channel 99.

Brian Berry, Tulalip TV Director of Video, tests audio feed for the first live broadcast of Tulalip board member swearing in on April 5.Photo/ Brandi N. Montreuil, Tulalip News

Brian Berry, Tulalip TV Director of Video, tests audio feed for the first live broadcast of Tulalip board member swearing in on April 5.
Photo/ Brandi N. Montreuil, Tulalip News

“Live coverage is an amazing tool to keep Tulalip citizens informed and connected, especially when they live off reservation,” said Tulalip Communications manager Niki Cleary. “One of the goals of the Communications Department is to keep tribal members educated and informed about issues facing the tribe so that they can make educated decisions about, and participate fully in, tribal governance. Efforts like this one really make a difference, they keep our citizens engaged.”

Tulalip TV provides live broadcast of Marysville School District’s Heritage High School sports and the Tulalip Graduation Banquet.

Mike Sarich, Tulalip TV Associate Producer checks camera placement during test set up for first live broadcast of Tulalip board member swearing in on April 5.Photo/ Brandi N. Montreuil, Tulalip News

Mike Sarich, Tulalip TV Associate Producer checks camera placement during test set up for first live broadcast of Tulalip board member swearing in on April 5.
Photo/ Brandi N. Montreuil, Tulalip News

“Every year the Communications Department evolves to meet the needs of the community,” Cleary went on to say. “In the last few years we have added Tulalip News, an online, expanded version of the See-Yaht-Sub. We added new on-camera talent for Heritage Sports coverage, as well as instant replay during games. This year we are working on live coverage of events, when possible, and more interaction with our citizens through social media.”

“At General Council meetings and over the last couple of years we’ve heard increasing requests for transparency and community involvement, hopefully this is just the beginning. We are always open to suggestions from our community to make our department more responsive and effective for our citizens,” Cleary said.

Tomorrow’s live broadcast will begin at 9:00 a.m. and can be viewed online at www.tulaliptv.com, and channel 99.

If you have an idea, a critique, or just want to share your thoughts, please email, ncleary@tulaliptribes-nsn.gov , or message her on facebook.com/nikicleary. You can also reach See-Yaht-Sub/ Tulalip News staff at editor@tulaliptribes-nsn.gov.

 

 

Brandi N. Montreuil: 360-913-5402; bmontreuil@tulaliptribes-nsn.gov

Williams to serve as Marysville Strawberry Festival Grand Marshal

Lauren SalcedoHerman Williams Sr. has been selected to be the Strawberry Festival Grand Marshal.

Lauren Salcedo
Herman Williams Sr. has been selected to be the Strawberry Festival Grand Marshal.

By Lauren Salcedo, The Marysville Globe

MARYSVILLE — Herman Williams Sr. is a former Tulalip Tribal Chair, Marysville School Board Director, Marysville High School ASB President and football quarterback. He is an artist, painter, musician, fisherman and storyteller. And now, he is adding one more title to his list of influence in the Marysville and Tulalip areas — Strawberry Festival Grand Marshal.

“Herman has been influential in Tulalip and Marysville for many years,” said Carol Kapua, of the Strawberry Festival. “Being one of the leaders of the Tribes, he has been instrumental in getting the Tribes to where they are today, especially in the business world.”

Since retiring in 1980, Williams has continued to focus on art, and uses paintings, stories and songs to honor the history of the Tribes.

“What I’m doing is trying to go back and depict the life of my ancestors,” said Williams. “I want to really show the life they had, and how they went through the trauma of people telling them they couldn’t sing their songs or tell their stories.”

When Williams found out about the selection as Grand Marshal, he thought it was a joke. When Kapua told him that he really was going to be Grand Marshal he was surprised and touched.

“It’s really rather an honor,” he said.

Willams will be in the Strawberry Festival Grand Parade on Saturday, June 15, and jokes that he will have to perfect his waving skills.