Interfaith vigil brings diverse community together

Tulalip member Robert "Wachadup" and Lisa Monger performed a traditional healing song during the interfaith prayer service, Tuesday, Feb. 24, 2014, in Marysville, WA. (Tulalip News/ Brandi N. Montreuil)

Tulalip member Robert “Wachadup” and Lisa Monger performed a traditional healing song during the interfaith prayer service, Tuesday, Feb. 24, 2014, in Marysville, WA. (Tulalip News/ Brandi N. Montreuil)

By Brandi N. Montreuil, Tulalip News

MARYSVILLE – More than a hundred people attended an interfaith prayer service held in the Marysville-Pilchuck High School auditorium on Tuesday, February 24. The event, organized by Reverend Terry Kyllo with the St. Philip’s Episcopal Church in Marysville, and Father Pat Twohy, director of the Rocky Mountain Mission for the Northwest Jesuits and who has a lengthy history of chaplain services in the Tulalip community, was designed to bring together the diverse cultures represented in the Tulalip/ Marysville communities during this time of healing.

The event was held on the four-month anniversary of the October 24 shooting at the high school where Tulalip tribal member Jaylen Fryberg killed four of his classmates leaving behind one survivor, 14-year-old Nate Hatch, also his relative. Killed were 15-year-old Andrew Fryberg, also related to the shooter, Zoe Galasso, Gia Soriano and Shaylee Chuckulnaskit, all 14.

Faith leaders representing many traditions in and around Tulalip and Marysville including Christian, Buddhist, Muslim, Jewish, Sikh, Baha’i and Unitarian welcomed Tulalip/ Marysville residents to a time of silence, prayer, encouraging words, and fellowship. Also in attendance were leaders from Tulalip Tribes, who offered a prayer of healing.

An interfaith prayer service was held for the Tulalip and Marysville Communities on the four-month anniversary of the Marysville- Pilchuck High School shooting, Tuesday, Feb. 24, 2015, in Marysville, WA. (Tulalip News/ Brandi N. Montreuil)

An interfaith prayer service was held for the Tulalip and Marysville Communities on the four-month anniversary of the Marysville- Pilchuck High School shooting, Tuesday, Feb. 24, 2015, in Marysville, WA.
(Tulalip News/ Brandi N. Montreuil)

“I know when tensions arise in the community and when there is fear that grabs hold, and there is some violence of some kind, that people have a really strong tendency to scapegoat people that they think are different than them,” said Rev. Kyllo about the idea around the interfaith service. “I started work with the recovery team and proposed in December that we might put on an interfaith service as a way to honor and celebrate the diversity of the community.”

Kyllo reached out to Father Twohy, whom he had never met, about hosting an interfaith service. “I walked up to him and I said, ‘Father Twohy, I want to do an interfaith service because we are all human and some of us don’t know that.’ He immediately said, ‘Amen brother. I am with you, give me a call.’ So we began working on the service.”

Throughout the service faith leaders shared words of encouragement before offering a prayer. Afterwards each faith leader would place a candle on table creating a circle of light meant to represent the community.

“It has been a real testing time for our community and you have all been a part of that,” Marysville Mayor Jon Nehring said to attendees. “I can tell you that I am so proud to live in a community like Tulalip/ Marysville. We really take care of one another.”

Marysville School District Superintendent Dr Becky Berg lists schools and communities around the globe who have experienced the same tragedy. A moment of silence was held for each one during an interfaith prayer service, Tuesday, Feb. 24,2015, in Marysville, WA. (Tulalip News/ Brandi N. Montreuil)

Marysville School District Superintendent Dr Becky Berg lists schools and communities around the globe who have experienced the same tragedy. A moment of silence was held for each one during an interfaith prayer service, Tuesday, Feb. 24,2015, in Marysville, WA. (Tulalip News/ Brandi N. Montreuil)

Echoing his sentiments Tulalip Tribes vice-chairman Les Parks spoke about Tulalip and Marysville’s continual support of one another. “When the mayor stands at my side here, to me it is a symbol of Marysville and the Tulalip people coming together as one community, and Dr. Berg represents all the students in the Marysville School District. To me it is important to remember why we are here. Four months ago this tragedy hit us and we lost four lives to a heinous crime, and we lost the shooter as well. We haven’t come to ask why this happened, because we will never understand why or what caused this to transpire. What we are going to do is share. We are going to cry together, grieve, heal and pray together. We are all in this together.”

Before the service concluded, a moment of silence was held for schools and communities around the world who have experienced the same type of tragedy.

 

Brandi N. Montreuil: 360-913-5402; bmontreuil@tulalipnews.com

Marysville Mayor Jon Nehring and Tulalip Tribes vice-chairman Les Parks speak about the two communities coming together to support one another following the shooting at the school on October 24, at an interfaith prayer service held, Tuesday, Feb. 24, 2015, in Marysville, WA. (Tulalip News/ Brandi N. Montreuil)

Marysville Mayor Jon Nehring and Tulalip Tribes vice-chairman Les Parks speak about the two communities coming together to support one another following the shooting at the school on October 24, at an interfaith prayer service held, Tuesday, Feb. 24, 2015, in Marysville, WA. (Tulalip News/ Brandi N. Montreuil)

 

Three candle were lit during the interfaith prayer service held in the MPHS auditorium, Tuesday, Feb. 24, 2015, in Marysville, WA. The candles symbolize the Tulalip, Marysville and the Marysville School District who have come together to support one another following the shooting. (Tulalip News/ Brandi N. Montreuil)

Three candle were lit during the interfaith prayer service held in the MPHS auditorium, Tuesday, Feb. 24, 2015, in Marysville, WA. The candles symbolize the Tulalip, Marysville and the Marysville School District who have come together to support one another following the shooting. (Tulalip News/ Brandi N. Montreuil)

 

Rev. Terry Kyllo, who organized the Feb. 24 interfaith prayer service, offers a prayer of healing during the event, Tuesday, Feb. 24, 2015, in Marysville, WA. (Tulalip News/ Brandi N. Montreuil)

Rev. Terry Kyllo, who organized the Feb. 24 interfaith prayer service, offers a prayer of healing during the event, Tuesday, Feb. 24, 2015, in Marysville, WA. (Tulalip News/ Brandi N. Montreuil)

 

Tulalip Tribal member Natosha Gobin offered a prayer of healing for the communities in Lushootseed, the traditional language of the Snohomish people during interfaith prayer service held, Tuesday, Feb. 24, 2015, in Marysville, WA. (Tulalip News/ Brandi N. Montreuil)

Tulalip Tribal member Natosha Gobin offered a prayer of healing for the communities in Lushootseed, the traditional language of the Snohomish people during interfaith prayer service held, Tuesday, Feb. 24, 2015, in Marysville, WA. (Tulalip News/ Brandi N. Montreuil)

 

The Marysville Getchell Choir performed two songs throughout the interfaith prayer service held, Tuesday, Feb. 24, 2015, in Marysville, WA. (Tulalip News/ Brandi N. Montreuil)

The Marysville Getchell Choir performed two songs throughout the interfaith prayer service held, Tuesday, Feb. 24, 2015, in Marysville, WA. (Tulalip News/ Brandi N. Montreuil)

Marysville School District receives dreamcatcher given to Columbine survivors

By Brandi N. Montreuil, Tulalip News

Marysville-Pilchuck High School Interim Assistant Principal Lori Stolee and Interim Co-Principal Deann Anguiano take possession of the dreamcatcher, Monday, Nov. 3, 2014, at Marysville School Board District office. (Tulalip News Photo/ Brandi N. Montreuil)

Marysville-Pilchuck High School Interim Assistant Principal Lori Stolee and Interim Co-Principal Deann Anguiano take possession of the dreamcatcher, Monday, Nov. 3, 2014, at Marysville School Board District office.
(Tulalip News Photo/ Brandi N. Montreuil)

MARYSVILLE – Following a tradition set by survivors of the Columbine High School shooting, the Marysville School District and Tulalip Tribes were presented a dreamcatcher symbolizing survival, on November 3.

During a modified school district board meeting, representatives from Sandy Hook Elementary and delegates from the Red Lake Nation in Minnesota gave the dreamcatcher and shared their story of healing.

The dreamcatcher was gifted to Columbine High School in Littleton, Colorado, following a shooting that left 13 people dead in 1999. It has since been passed onto other school districts that have experienced similar tragedies and evolved into emblem of healing for survivors.

John Oakgrove of the Little Thunderbirds Drum and Dance Troupe from Red Lake Minnesota made the trek from Red Lake as a sign of unity. Survivors of Columbine took the dreamcatcher to the Red Lake Reservation following a school shooting there in 2005 that left 10 people dead, including the 16-year-old shooter. Oakgrove has travelled to present the dreamcatcher since, taking along his children who sing honor songs for survivors as part of the healing process. He was there when the dreamcatcher was presented to Sandy Hook Elementary School officials in 2012 following the deaths

Tulalip Tribes council members Theresa Sheldon and Deborah Parker receive hand written notes from Stephanie Hope Smith from the Newtown Rotary Club, Monday, Nov. 3, 2014, at the Marysville School District Administrative offices. The notes were made by well wishers and given to the Sandy Hook Elementary School following the deaths of 26 children and adults from a 2012 shooting. (Tulalip News Photo/ Brandi N. Montreuil)

Tulalip Tribes council members Theresa Sheldon and Deborah Parker receive hand written notes from Stephanie Hope Smith from the Newtown Rotary Club, Monday, Nov. 3, 2014, at the Marysville School District Administrative offices. The notes were made by well wishers and given to the Sandy Hook Elementary School following the deaths of 26 children and adults from a 2012 shooting. (Tulalip News Photo/ Brandi N. Montreuil)

of 26 children and adults.

“I hate meeting people like this, but we came because we want to offer our support. We know what they are going through,” said Oakgrove.

Sandy Hook Elementary representatives Susan Connelly, Newtown Middle School counselor and Stephanie Hope Smith a member of the Newtown Rotary Club, spoke about the sobering baton that connects the schools.

“We are united in hope. I’m sorry we are united in grief. I’m sorry we have the experience and expertise to share,” said Smith.

“This plaque is more than just a dreamcatcher. It is made with such love. It is our hope that you should never have to pass it onto another community,” said Connelly.

Also present during the meeting was Marysville School District Superintendent Becky Berg and board members Chris Nation and Tom Albright, Marysville Mayor Jon Nehring, Marysville Police Chief Rick Smith, Marysville-Pilchuck High School Principals and Tulalip Tribes council members Deborah Parker and Theresa Sheldon.

 

 

Brandi N. Montreuil: 360-913-5402; bmontreuil@tulalipnews.com

Mayor of Marysville establishes new Youth Council

Press Release, Office of the Mayor, Dec. 3, 2012

Mayor establishes new Youth Council; seeks student members to give young people a stronger voice in their community’s future

MARYSVILLE – The voice of Marysville’s youth needs to be a bigger part of the dialogue when talking about how the community builds for tomorrow.

Mayor Jon Nehring is establishing a new Youth Council to create that essential link among Marysville’s teens, the community and city government.

The Youth Council will advise the Mayor on issues affecting young people in Marysville and provide youth perspective on a range of community issues and topics. The Council will also provide a forum to engage with City leaders, participate in a community service project, and connect with their peers, and learn about civics and city government.

“I’m hoping that we get young people to become involved from a variety of diverse cultures and backgrounds, who are ready to share their valuable views with city government,” Nehring says. “My goal is that every young man and woman will leave the Youth Council with a better understanding of civic duty and a moral responsibility to our community.”

Nehring also believes young people willbenefit from involvement in the Youth Council through developing their personal and employability skills.

The Youth Council is open to Marysville teens ages 14-18 and enrolled in public or private school, or home-schooled (at the City’s discretion and under some circumstances, 13-year-olds may be permitted to join). Parent or guardian signature required for all ages.

Interested applicants are invited to download the application from the City website at http://marysvillewa.gov/youthcouncil. Applications are due by 5 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 10. Return in care of Youth Council/Doug Buell, Marysville City Hall, 1049 State Ave., Marysville, WA 98270. Or scan signed copy to dbuell@marysvillewa.gov.

The Youth Council will be structured to meet monthly for one-hour, after-school meetings in the City Council Chambers at City Hall. However, as a substitute for sitting in meetings, field trips such as the Police Department, a Fire Station, Municipal Court, Wastewater Treatment Plant and the Tulalip Hibulb Cultural Center, and a spring community service project, could also become part of the annual agenda, as well as other recreation activities.

For more information contact Community Information Officer Doug Buell, Youth Council Liaison, at (360) 363-8086 or email dbuell@marysvillewa.gov. You will be notified of a kick-off meeting to be scheduled later in January 2013. Food and refreshments will be provided.