Heartfelt donation finds its way home

Rochele Hammond presents the signed Michael Bennett football to Nate Hatch. Hatch donated the football to the Tulalip Boys & Girls Club Auction to help raise funds for the club's program. Photo/ Brandi N. Montreuil, Tulalip News

Rochele Hammond presents the signed Michael Bennett football to Nate Hatch. Hatch donated the football to the Tulalip Boys & Girls Club Auction to help raise funds for the club’s program.
Photo/ Brandi N. Montreuil, Tulalip News

By Brandi N. Montreuil, Tulalip News

TULALIP – Rochele Hammond, husband Ken and sons Josh, Jake and Bradon purchased a priceless item donated to this year’s annual Tulalip Boys & Girls Club auction held Saturday, May 9.

The item is a football signed by Seattle Seahawks #72 defensive end Michael Bennett. It wasn’t just the autograph that made this item priceless to bidders, it was the story behind it that resonated with the Hammonds.

The football was donated by Nate Hatch, the only survivor among the five students attacked in the school shooting on October 24 at Marysville-Pilchuck High School. Hatch was presented the football by Bennett following the tragedy.

Hatch, a former Tulalip Boys & Girls Club member, decided to donate the football to help raise funds for the club’s programs.

The Hammonds won the final bid but knew the football was worth much more than what they had paid for it. They decided to return the football to Hatch.

“He deserves to have it and I knew he was meant to have it,” said Rochele . “We want him to know we are thinking of him. It just needs to be with him.”

Tulalip Police Department recognize own for outstanding service

Tulalip Police officers during the department's awards banquet, Wednesday, Feb. 11, 2015, at the Tulalip Resort Casino. (Photo courtesy Theresa Sheldon)

Tulalip Police officers during the department’s awards banquet, Wednesday, Feb. 11, 2015, at the Tulalip Resort Casino. (Photo courtesy Theresa Sheldon)

By Brandi N. Montreuil, Tulalip News

TULALIP – “Honoring one honors us all” was the theme of the 2015 Tulalip Police Department Awards Banquet, held Wednesday, February 11, at the Tulalip Resort Casino. The banquet was held in recognition for officers and staff who have demonstrated exceptional professionalism and leadership within their positions as Tulalip Police officers or Tulalip Police staff members.

This year three officers, one staff member and a community member were highlighted for their outstanding work in the department and with the Tulalip community. While all officers and staff put 100 percent into serving the Tulalip community, Tulalip Chief of Police Carlos Echevarria said, “these officers’ and staff members’ work stood out.”
“With such a large staff it’s hard to choose just a select few. They all do such a great job throughout the year,” said Chief Echevarria.

Fish and Wildlife officer Clayton Horne was named Fish and Wildlife Officer of the Year for his service with the police department, while Lorelei Ranney was named Employee of the Year for her outstanding work and dedication in assisting officers and other department staff. The Chief’s Award was presented to Senior Officer Jeremy Mooring for his leadership, integrity, and willingness to go above and beyond the call of duty.

Tulalip Chief of Police Carlos Echevarria presents the  "Officer of the Year" award to K9 officer M.C. Engen and his canine partner Wolfy, Wednesday, Feb. 11, 2015, at the Tulalip Police Department awards banquet held at the Tulalip Resort Casino. (Photo courtesy Theresa Sheldon)

Tulalip Chief of Police Carlos Echevarria presents the “Officer of the Year” award to K9 officer M.C. Engen and his canine partner Wolfy, Wednesday, Feb. 11, 2015, at the Tulalip Police Department awards banquet held at the Tulalip Resort Casino. (Photo courtesy Theresa Sheldon)

When presenting the award, Chief Echevarria had this to say about officer Mooring, “You have consistently performed your duties in an exemplary and professional manner.” Echevarria commended officer Mooring’s can-do attitude and praised his willingness to assist officers by taking on additional shifts when needed and helping to make safer road conditions for travelers in Tulalip.

The prestigious Officer of the Year award was presented to K-9 Officer Wolfy, whose watch ended on January 2, when she lost her battle with cancer. Wolfy’s handler and partner, officer M.C. Engen, received the award in Wolfy’s honor.

“Throughout their partnership, they have assisted in cases with the Tulalip PD Drug Task Force, FBI, DEA, and ATF agencies. We would like to commend you and your partner with the Officer of the Year award for the dedication and commitment you have provided to the department. Your devotion to the community, professionalism and commitment to duty reflected great credit upon yourself, the Tulalip Police Department and the Tulalip Tribes,” said Echevarria to officer Engen.

The department recognized community member Nate Hatch for their Honoring Our Own award, an annual award that is presented to community members who exhibit a commitment to leadership, trust, respect and service above self within the community.

Tulalip Police officer Sherman Pruitt shakes Nate Hatch's hand, Wednesday, Feb 11, 2015, during the Tulalip Police Awards Banquet held at the Tulalip Resort Casino. Hatch was presented the department's "Honoring Our Own" award for his bravery during and after the Oct. 24, 2014 shooting at Marysville High School. He is the only survivor who was shot that day. (Photo courtesy Theresa Sheldon)

Tulalip Police officer Sherman Pruitt shakes Nate Hatch’s hand, Wednesday, Feb 11, 2015, during the Tulalip Police Awards Banquet held at the Tulalip Resort Casino. Hatch was presented the department’s “Honoring Our Own” award for his bravery during and after the Oct. 24, 2014 shooting at Marysville High School. He is the only survivor who was shot that day. (Photo courtesy Theresa Sheldon)

“Nate Hatch, you have shown strong character, a can-do positive attitude, brilliant smile, sense of humor and most importantly, you have been an inspiration to the entire world following the events that occurred on October 24, 2014. Your bravery is second to none and we applaud you,” said Echevarria.

“Our year was cut short. As a tribal member, community member and chief of police it felt as though our year started on January 1 and ended on October 24. I literally cannot tell you what I did from October 24, until the end of the year; it is one large blur. As I look back, I can’t think of a better group of individuals in this police department and as a team that showed great courage, leadership, professionalism and the willingness to go above and beyond for the community, as I did in this group, that I would want to serve with,” said Chief Echevarria.

Wrapping up the banquet, all Tulalip officers and TPD staff members were presented a commemorative coin specially designed for them. Each coin symbolizes the dedication and commitment staff and officers have to keeping the Tulalip community safe.

Tulalip Police Officer Jim Williams. Photo Courtesy Theresa Sheldon

Tulalip Police Officer Jim Williams.
Photo Courtesy Theresa Sheldon

 

Brandi N. Montreuil: 360-913-5402; bmontreuil@tulalipnews.com

 

Interfaith vigil brings diverse community together

Tulalip member Robert "Wachadup" and Lisa Monger performed a traditional healing song during the interfaith prayer service, Tuesday, Feb. 24, 2014, in Marysville, WA. (Tulalip News/ Brandi N. Montreuil)

Tulalip member Robert “Wachadup” and Lisa Monger performed a traditional healing song during the interfaith prayer service, Tuesday, Feb. 24, 2014, in Marysville, WA. (Tulalip News/ Brandi N. Montreuil)

By Brandi N. Montreuil, Tulalip News

MARYSVILLE – More than a hundred people attended an interfaith prayer service held in the Marysville-Pilchuck High School auditorium on Tuesday, February 24. The event, organized by Reverend Terry Kyllo with the St. Philip’s Episcopal Church in Marysville, and Father Pat Twohy, director of the Rocky Mountain Mission for the Northwest Jesuits and who has a lengthy history of chaplain services in the Tulalip community, was designed to bring together the diverse cultures represented in the Tulalip/ Marysville communities during this time of healing.

The event was held on the four-month anniversary of the October 24 shooting at the high school where Tulalip tribal member Jaylen Fryberg killed four of his classmates leaving behind one survivor, 14-year-old Nate Hatch, also his relative. Killed were 15-year-old Andrew Fryberg, also related to the shooter, Zoe Galasso, Gia Soriano and Shaylee Chuckulnaskit, all 14.

Faith leaders representing many traditions in and around Tulalip and Marysville including Christian, Buddhist, Muslim, Jewish, Sikh, Baha’i and Unitarian welcomed Tulalip/ Marysville residents to a time of silence, prayer, encouraging words, and fellowship. Also in attendance were leaders from Tulalip Tribes, who offered a prayer of healing.

An interfaith prayer service was held for the Tulalip and Marysville Communities on the four-month anniversary of the Marysville- Pilchuck High School shooting, Tuesday, Feb. 24, 2015, in Marysville, WA. (Tulalip News/ Brandi N. Montreuil)

An interfaith prayer service was held for the Tulalip and Marysville Communities on the four-month anniversary of the Marysville- Pilchuck High School shooting, Tuesday, Feb. 24, 2015, in Marysville, WA.
(Tulalip News/ Brandi N. Montreuil)

“I know when tensions arise in the community and when there is fear that grabs hold, and there is some violence of some kind, that people have a really strong tendency to scapegoat people that they think are different than them,” said Rev. Kyllo about the idea around the interfaith service. “I started work with the recovery team and proposed in December that we might put on an interfaith service as a way to honor and celebrate the diversity of the community.”

Kyllo reached out to Father Twohy, whom he had never met, about hosting an interfaith service. “I walked up to him and I said, ‘Father Twohy, I want to do an interfaith service because we are all human and some of us don’t know that.’ He immediately said, ‘Amen brother. I am with you, give me a call.’ So we began working on the service.”

Throughout the service faith leaders shared words of encouragement before offering a prayer. Afterwards each faith leader would place a candle on table creating a circle of light meant to represent the community.

“It has been a real testing time for our community and you have all been a part of that,” Marysville Mayor Jon Nehring said to attendees. “I can tell you that I am so proud to live in a community like Tulalip/ Marysville. We really take care of one another.”

Marysville School District Superintendent Dr Becky Berg lists schools and communities around the globe who have experienced the same tragedy. A moment of silence was held for each one during an interfaith prayer service, Tuesday, Feb. 24,2015, in Marysville, WA. (Tulalip News/ Brandi N. Montreuil)

Marysville School District Superintendent Dr Becky Berg lists schools and communities around the globe who have experienced the same tragedy. A moment of silence was held for each one during an interfaith prayer service, Tuesday, Feb. 24,2015, in Marysville, WA. (Tulalip News/ Brandi N. Montreuil)

Echoing his sentiments Tulalip Tribes vice-chairman Les Parks spoke about Tulalip and Marysville’s continual support of one another. “When the mayor stands at my side here, to me it is a symbol of Marysville and the Tulalip people coming together as one community, and Dr. Berg represents all the students in the Marysville School District. To me it is important to remember why we are here. Four months ago this tragedy hit us and we lost four lives to a heinous crime, and we lost the shooter as well. We haven’t come to ask why this happened, because we will never understand why or what caused this to transpire. What we are going to do is share. We are going to cry together, grieve, heal and pray together. We are all in this together.”

Before the service concluded, a moment of silence was held for schools and communities around the world who have experienced the same type of tragedy.

 

Brandi N. Montreuil: 360-913-5402; bmontreuil@tulalipnews.com

Marysville Mayor Jon Nehring and Tulalip Tribes vice-chairman Les Parks speak about the two communities coming together to support one another following the shooting at the school on October 24, at an interfaith prayer service held, Tuesday, Feb. 24, 2015, in Marysville, WA. (Tulalip News/ Brandi N. Montreuil)

Marysville Mayor Jon Nehring and Tulalip Tribes vice-chairman Les Parks speak about the two communities coming together to support one another following the shooting at the school on October 24, at an interfaith prayer service held, Tuesday, Feb. 24, 2015, in Marysville, WA. (Tulalip News/ Brandi N. Montreuil)

 

Three candle were lit during the interfaith prayer service held in the MPHS auditorium, Tuesday, Feb. 24, 2015, in Marysville, WA. The candles symbolize the Tulalip, Marysville and the Marysville School District who have come together to support one another following the shooting. (Tulalip News/ Brandi N. Montreuil)

Three candle were lit during the interfaith prayer service held in the MPHS auditorium, Tuesday, Feb. 24, 2015, in Marysville, WA. The candles symbolize the Tulalip, Marysville and the Marysville School District who have come together to support one another following the shooting. (Tulalip News/ Brandi N. Montreuil)

 

Rev. Terry Kyllo, who organized the Feb. 24 interfaith prayer service, offers a prayer of healing during the event, Tuesday, Feb. 24, 2015, in Marysville, WA. (Tulalip News/ Brandi N. Montreuil)

Rev. Terry Kyllo, who organized the Feb. 24 interfaith prayer service, offers a prayer of healing during the event, Tuesday, Feb. 24, 2015, in Marysville, WA. (Tulalip News/ Brandi N. Montreuil)

 

Tulalip Tribal member Natosha Gobin offered a prayer of healing for the communities in Lushootseed, the traditional language of the Snohomish people during interfaith prayer service held, Tuesday, Feb. 24, 2015, in Marysville, WA. (Tulalip News/ Brandi N. Montreuil)

Tulalip Tribal member Natosha Gobin offered a prayer of healing for the communities in Lushootseed, the traditional language of the Snohomish people during interfaith prayer service held, Tuesday, Feb. 24, 2015, in Marysville, WA. (Tulalip News/ Brandi N. Montreuil)

 

The Marysville Getchell Choir performed two songs throughout the interfaith prayer service held, Tuesday, Feb. 24, 2015, in Marysville, WA. (Tulalip News/ Brandi N. Montreuil)

The Marysville Getchell Choir performed two songs throughout the interfaith prayer service held, Tuesday, Feb. 24, 2015, in Marysville, WA. (Tulalip News/ Brandi N. Montreuil)

Hundreds welcome Nate Hatch back to Tulalip

Photo/ Brandi N. Montreuil, Tulalip News

Tulalip Tribal members and Tulalip community members line the street waiting to welcome Nate Hatch home, Thursday, Nov. 6, 2014, on the Tulalip Indian Reservation. Hatch was shot in the jaw during the Oct. 24, 2014 Marysville-Pilchuck High school shooting by fellow classmate and friend Jaylen Fryberg.  (Tulalip News Photo/ Brandi N. Montreuil)

Tulalip community holds surprise homecoming for victim of MP shooting

By Brandi N. Montreuil, Tulalip News

TULALIP – Amid chants of welcome home, 14-year-old Nate Hatch received a surprise homecoming from more than 200 friends and family in the Tulalip community when he arrived home to the Tulalip Indian Reservation on November 6. That morning Hatch was released from Harborview Medical Center, where he had been hospitalized after receiving a gunshot wound to the jaw during the October 24, Marysville-Pilchuck High School shooting.

One of five students hit when fellow classmate and friend Jaylen Fryberg opened fire during lunch inside the MP cafeteria. Hatch is the only survivor of four who were hospitalized. Gia Soriano, Shaylee Chuckulnaskit, and Andrew Fryberg died from their injuries after being hospitalized. Zoe Galasso died at the scene along with Jaylen, who died from a self-inflicted wound.

Photo/ Brandi N. Montreuil, Tulalip News

Barely visible inside a black Tulalip Police vehicle, Nate Hatch waves to well-wishers on Thursday, Nov. 6, 2014 on the Tulalip Indian Reservation. Over 200 community members lined the corner of 27th Ave Ne and Marine Drive to chant welcome home as he  was driven past. (Tulalip News Photo/ Brandi N. Montreuil)

Hatch was barely visible inside a black Tulalip Police vehicle shortly before 1:00 p.m. when he drove pass greeters who lined the corner of 27th Ave NE and Marine Drive. Supporters braved gusts of wind and rain for more than an hour to make sure they were there to welcome him home. Students and staff from the Marysville Tulalip Campus, which is the site of Heritage High School and Quil Ceda Elementary School, were also on-site to welcome him.

Managing a slight smile and wave as he past greeters, Hatch took to social media later that evening to tweet, “It’s good to be home.”

In a statement issued by the family following his release, a request for privacy and condolences were issued.

“We appreciate all the amazing support we have received from the community. We are grateful for the top-notch care Nate received from the team at Harborview Medical Center. Our hearts and prayers go out to all the families who have been affected by this horrific tragedy. Please allow us the privacy we need to continue on the road of recovery. Thank you.”

Photo/ Brandi N. Montreuil, Tulalip News

Tulalip Tribal members and Tulalip community members line the street waiting to welcome Nate Hatch home, Thursday, Nov. 6, 2014, on the Tulalip Indian Reservation. Hatch was shot in the jaw during the Oct. 24, 2014 Marysville-Pilchuck High school shooting by fellow classmate and friend Jaylen Fryberg. (Tulalip News Photo/ Brandi N. Montreuil)

 

Tulalip tribal member Zee Jimicum, Native American liaison with the Marysville School District, was among the 200 supporters who welcomed Nate home. Jimicum’s son, a freshman at MP, described how as a mother she understood the pain Nate’s family is going through.

“The grief is overwhelming and as a mother my heart has ached from the moment I heard the news.  I gladly participated in Nate’s homecoming as another way to help support our community. As the anticipation built with every update we got about Nate’s arrival, I found my emotions welling up inside me. I was excited for Nate, excited that he was stable enough to leave the hospital. As great as that is, I know being home is just a baby step towards the spiritual, physical, emotional and physiological healing he will need. Participating in Nate’s homecoming was more than being just another person lining Marive Drive, I felt blessed to be a part of it all because it was part of the healing process for me,” said Jimicum.

Nate continues to recover from his wounds and since his return home uses social media to express his grief over the incident and thanks for community support.

Tulalip Tribal members and Tulalip community members line the street waiting to welcome Nate Hatch home, Thursday, Nov. 6, 2014, on the Tulalip Indian Reservation. Hatch was shot in the jaw during the Oct. 24, 2014 Marysville-Pilchuck High school shooting by fellow classmate and friend Jaylen Fryberg.  (Tulalip News Photo/ Brandi N. Montreuil)

Tulalip Tribal members and Tulalip community members line the street waiting to welcome Nate Hatch home, Thursday, Nov. 6, 2014, on the Tulalip Indian Reservation. Hatch was shot in the jaw during the Oct. 24, 2014 Marysville-Pilchuck High school shooting by fellow classmate and friend Jaylen Fryberg. (Tulalip News Photo/ Brandi N. Montreuil)

 

Tulalip Tribal members and Tulalip community members line the street waiting to welcome Nate Hatch home, Thursday, Nov. 6, 2014, on the Tulalip Indian Reservation. Hatch was shot in the jaw during the Oct. 24, 2014 Marysville-Pilchuck High school shooting by fellow classmate and friend Jaylen Fryberg.  (Tulalip News Photo/ Brandi N. Montreuil)

Tulalip Tribal members and Tulalip community members line the street waiting to welcome Nate Hatch home, Thursday, Nov. 6, 2014, on the Tulalip Indian Reservation. Hatch was shot in the jaw during the Oct. 24, 2014 Marysville-Pilchuck High school shooting by fellow classmate and friend Jaylen Fryberg. (Tulalip News Photo/ Brandi N. Montreuil)

Tulalip Tribal members and Tulalip community members line the street waiting to welcome Nate Hatch home, Thursday, Nov. 6, 2014, on the Tulalip Indian Reservation. Hatch was shot in the jaw during the Oct. 24, 2014 Marysville-Pilchuck High school shooting by fellow classmate and friend Jaylen Fryberg.  (Tulalip News Photo/ Brandi N. Montreuil)

Tulalip Tribal members and Tulalip community members line the street waiting to welcome Nate Hatch home, Thursday, Nov. 6, 2014, on the Tulalip Indian Reservation. Hatch was shot in the jaw during the Oct. 24, 2014 Marysville-Pilchuck High school shooting by fellow classmate and friend Jaylen Fryberg. (Tulalip News Photo/ Brandi N. Montreuil)

Tulalip Tribal members and Tulalip community members line the street waiting to welcome Nate Hatch home, Thursday, Nov. 6, 2014, on the Tulalip Indian Reservation. Hatch was shot in the jaw during the Oct. 24, 2014 Marysville-Pilchuck High school shooting by fellow classmate and friend Jaylen Fryberg.  (Tulalip News Photo/ Brandi N. Montreuil)

Tulalip Tribal members and Tulalip community members line the street waiting to welcome Nate Hatch home, Thursday, Nov. 6, 2014, on the Tulalip Indian Reservation. Hatch was shot in the jaw during the Oct. 24, 2014 Marysville-Pilchuck High school shooting by fellow classmate and friend Jaylen Fryberg. (Tulalip News Photo/ Brandi N. Montreuil)

Tulalip Tribal members and Tulalip community members line the street waiting to welcome Nate Hatch home, Thursday, Nov. 6, 2014, on the Tulalip Indian Reservation. Hatch was shot in the jaw during the Oct. 24, 2014 Marysville-Pilchuck High school shooting by fellow classmate and friend Jaylen Fryberg.  (Tulalip News Photo/ Brandi N. Montreuil)

Tulalip Tribal members and Tulalip community members line the street waiting to welcome Nate Hatch home, Thursday, Nov. 6, 2014, on the Tulalip Indian Reservation. Hatch was shot in the jaw during the Oct. 24, 2014 Marysville-Pilchuck High school shooting by fellow classmate and friend Jaylen Fryberg. (Tulalip News Photo/ Brandi N. Montreuil)

Tulalip Tribal members and Tulalip community members line the street waiting to welcome Nate Hatch home, Thursday, Nov. 6, 2014, on the Tulalip Indian Reservation. Hatch was shot in the jaw during the Oct. 24, 2014 Marysville-Pilchuck High school shooting by fellow classmate and friend Jaylen Fryberg.  (Tulalip News Photo/ Brandi N. Montreuil)

Tulalip Tribal members and Tulalip community members line the street waiting to welcome Nate Hatch home, Thursday, Nov. 6, 2014, on the Tulalip Indian Reservation. Hatch was shot in the jaw during the Oct. 24, 2014 Marysville-Pilchuck High school shooting by fellow classmate and friend Jaylen Fryberg. (Tulalip News Photo/ Brandi N. Montreuil)

 

Tulalip Tribal members and Tulalip community members line the street waiting to welcome Nate Hatch home, Thursday, Nov. 6, 2014, on the Tulalip Indian Reservation. Hatch was shot in the jaw during the Oct. 24, 2014 Marysville-Pilchuck High school shooting by fellow classmate and friend Jaylen Fryberg.  (Tulalip News Photo/ Brandi N. Montreuil)

Tulalip Tribal members and Tulalip community members line the street waiting to welcome Nate Hatch home, Thursday, Nov. 6, 2014, on the Tulalip Indian Reservation. Hatch was shot in the jaw during the Oct. 24, 2014 Marysville-Pilchuck High school shooting by fellow classmate and friend Jaylen Fryberg. (Tulalip News Photo/ Brandi N. Montreuil)

 

 

Tulalip Tribal members and Tulalip community members line the street waiting to welcome Nate Hatch home, Thursday, Nov. 6, 2014, on the Tulalip Indian Reservation. Hatch was shot in the jaw during the Oct. 24, 2014 Marysville-Pilchuck High school shooting by fellow classmate and friend Jaylen Fryberg.  (Tulalip News Photo/ Brandi N. Montreuil)

Tulalip Tribal members and Tulalip community members line the street waiting to welcome Nate Hatch home, Thursday, Nov. 6, 2014, on the Tulalip Indian Reservation. Hatch was shot in the jaw during the Oct. 24, 2014 Marysville-Pilchuck High school shooting by fellow classmate and friend Jaylen Fryberg. (Tulalip News Photo/ Brandi N. Montreuil)

 

Brandi N. Montreuil: 360-913-5402; bmontreuil@tulalipnews.com