Cultural teachings continue with new story poles at Tulalip

 

Tulalip Master Carvers Joe Gobin and James Madison and sons.

Tulalip Master Carvers Joe Gobin and James Madison and sons.

 

By Kim Kalliber, Tulalip News

 

“We’re not petrified, we’re still alive”

 

These strong words by James Madison were spoken by his grandfather, Frank Madison, before him. And that is the message Madison wishes to convey to the next generation of Native youth, keep us alive.

Maintaining our culture is of the upmost importance to Indigenous communities like Tulalip. On March 7, Tulalip tribal leaders, tribal members and tribal employees gathered outside the Tulalip Administration Building to welcome two beautiful new story poles, one featuring an orca, the other an octpous, that take position outside the entrance to the building. The poles, made from red cedar, were created by Tulalip master carvers, Joe Gobin and James Madison.

Orca pole created by Joe Gobin.

Orca pole created by Joe Gobin.

 

Octopus pole created by James Madison.

Octopus pole created by James Madison.

 

The unveiling of the poles began with a prayer followed by singing and drumming. Gobin and Madison then shared the meaning of the poles.

Gobin, who carved the Orca pole, explains that, “we’re killer whale people. The person on top is our spirit of the whale.” The eagle design represents the eagles that watch over our gatherings.

The octopus pole features a diving rock. This represents the power of the Native people. Madison’s grandfather told stories of this water power, and how they would jump into the water with a diving rock and get water power for protection.

Madison, with a hand on the shoulder of each his two sons, spoke of how proud his grandfather is for us putting our culture into our tribal buildings.

 

Tulalip tribal drummers and singers.

Tulalip tribal drummers and singers.

Tulalip Tribal Chairman Mel Sheldon and various tribal board members gave thanks to the artists and the art work, while emphasizing the importance of the teachings being passed on.

Wrapping up the unveiling was a singing and drumming performance by Quil Ceda Elementary students.

 

Quit Ceda Elementary students

Quil Ceda Elementary students

 

Crowd gathered at the Tulalip Administration Building for the totem pole unveiling.

Crowd gathered at the Tulalip Administration Building for the totem pole unveiling.

 

 

 

Nike’s New Seattle Seahawks Uniforms Inspired by Native Totem Poles

Source: Indian Country Today Media Network

This article was originally published on 4/5/2012

Nike made “new” uniforms for all 32 football teams in the NFL.  In reality, they simply made technological advancements to material of the uniforms themselves, making them sleeker, tighter, and more strategically padded. As Mark Parker, CEO of Nike, told the USA Today, the jerseys are up to thirty percent lighter, they’re made with a four-way stretch that gives players a more contoured fit with less material for tacklers to grab, and there’s built-in padding in certain parts of the uniforms. “It’s extra layers where you need it and none where you don’t,” he told the USA Today. As for the actual look of the uniforms, most of the 32 teams in the leagues saw no discernible change in their logos, colors and designs…save for the Seattle Seahawks. USA Today reports that the Portland, Oregon-based Nike drew on design features from the team and company’s home in the Pacific Northwest, and were inspired by the rich Native history of the region. Specifically, Nike drew on the designs taken from totem poles, making the bird on the helmet come to a significant point on the back.  Instead of the Seahawks taking an Indian name and image for their mascot and logo, they’re simply allowing themselves to be inspired by the history and heritage of Native peoples of their region. See for yourself below, and let us know what you think:

The Seahawks helmet was redesigned in 2012 themed off of a seahawk bird taken from Native American cutlure
The Seahawks helmet was redesigned in 2012 themed off of a seahawk bird taken from Native American culture

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Read more at http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/2014/01/20/nikes-new-seattle-seahawks-uniforms-inspired-native-totem-poles-153180