Tulalip TV mentor young filmmakers during film project

Heritage High School students filming a scene for 'Lady of the Woods," a project for their multi-media class. Photo/ Brandi N. Montreuil, Tulalip News

Heritage High School students filming a scene for ‘Lady of the Woods,” a project for their multi-media class.
Photo/ Brandi N. Montreuil, Tulalip News

By Brandi N. Montreuil, Tulalip News

TULALIPQuiet on set. Camera frame. Speed. Mark it. Action!

Brian Berry, Tulalip TV's Director of Video checks over scenes to shoot with Tulalip Hertiage High School students during filming "Lady of the Woods," a Heritage multi-media class project. Photo/ Brandi N. Montreuil, Tulalip News

Brian Berry, Tulalip TV’s Director of Video checks over scenes to shoot with Tulalip Hertiage High School students during filming “Lady of the Woods,” a Heritage multi-media class project.
Photo/ Brandi N. Montreuil, Tulalip News

Tulalip Heritage High School students recently held their filmmaking debut on Friday, June 13, with a little help from Tulalip TV, subsidiary of Tulalip Tribes Communications. Through a unique collaboration between Heritage High School and Tulalip TV, multi-media students received a crash course on film production to produce a short film titled, “Lady of the Woods.”

The project, created by Heritage principal Shelly Lacy and Heritage teacher Cerissa Gobin, required students to not only learn pre and post- film production and editing, but also to create a script and act it out.

“A lot of times, as viewers, we don’t think about how a movie comes together,” said Niki Cleary, Tulalip Tribes Communications Director. “This gave our youth a chance to see that it doesn’t happen all at once from start to finish. They had the fun experience of shooting scenes out of sequence. The scenes, which happen one right after another in the movie, were shot on different days. Unfortunately, the students forgot to wear the same clothing, which made for some continuity issues, but really helped them learn some of the basic principles

Heritage High School student Adiya Jones worked as 'Lady of the Woods" cinematographer during filming. Photo/ Brandi N. Montreuil, Tulalip News

Heritage High School student Adiya Jones worked as ‘Lady of the Woods” cinematographer during filming.
Photo/ Brandi N. Montreuil, Tulalip News

of movie production.”

The short film, which started off initially as a game show in brain storming sessions, provided students the entire film production process on a limited schedule. This included learning filmmaking terminology, which to untrained ears, sounds a lot like random dialogue being yelled out by the director from behind the camera. Roll camera. Tilt. Speed frame. Fade in.

“I am very happy with what we were able to accomplish in such a short period of time,” said Brian Berry, director of video for Tulalip TV, who worked with students throughout the filming.  “We all knew that we were working against the clock, and that was one of the skills that the students learned, time management with regard to productions. We saw a lot of interest from many of the students and we hope this spark will ignite a growing base of students who want to continue with this type of study and possibly career path.”

That’s a wrap. As part of the filmmaking process, students debuted “Lady in the Woods” to underclassmen during the last days of school completing their filmmaking process.

“The student participation has been amazing. Although listening to the lecture portion of class was tough, they really engaged once they got hands on with the equipment,” said Cleary. “Ultimately, we hope to train the Heritage students to the point that they are able to cover Heritage Sports with a student staffed video crew. The skills they learn can also be used to

Heritage High School students, Aryik Miranda, Shawn Sanchey, Jaylin Rivera and Desirea Williams rehearse their lines before filming their next scene for 'Lady of the Woods.'Photo/ Brandi N. Montreuil, Tulalip News

Heritage High School students, Aryik Miranda, Shawn Sanchey, Jaylin Rivera and Desirea Williams rehearse their lines before filming their next scene for ‘Lady of the Woods.’
Photo/ Brandi N. Montreuil, Tulalip News

produce a Heritage news program, public service announcements or any number of exciting video projects. We hope that the students who learn video skills at Heritage will be the next generation of Communications Department employees.”

 

Brandi N. Montreuil: 360-913-5402; bmontreuil@tulalipnews.com

 

 

 

Learn about “Spirit of the Ojibwe” on Tulalip TV

Chathlopotle Plankhouse

Chathlopotle Plankhouse

 

By Roger Vater, Tulalip TV

Premiering on Tulalip TV this week is a new episode of Native Report # 808.

Native Report is an entertaining, informative magazine style series that celebrates Native American culture and heritage, listens to tribal elders, and talks to some of the most powerful and influential leaders of Indian country today.

In this edition of Native Report we learn about “Spirit of the Ojibwe,” a special book devoted to the elders of the Lac Courte Oreilles Reservation in Wisconsin. We visit the Chathlopotle Plankhouse, a traditional Chinookan-style cedar structure. And we learn about how the best practices toward revitalizing the Maori Language can also be applied to other language preservation efforts. We also learn something new about Indian country and hear from our elders on this edition of Native Report.

You will be able to watch Native Report Episode – 808 and many other Native programs on Tulalip TV, Channel 99 on Tulalip Broadband or Live on www.TulalipTV.com on a PC, Mac or any ‘Smart’ device such as phone or tablet.

Native Report – 808 can be watched at either of these times: 1:00 p.m. or 9:30p.m.

For a current schedule of Tulalip TV, you can always visit: http://www.tulaliptv.com/tulaliptv-schedule/

 

Tulalip TV program explores diabetes in first Tulalip Health Watch episode

Tulalip-Health-Watch-4

Tulalip TV’s Tulalip Health Watch will air this summer and will focus on health issues Native Americans face today.
Photo/ Brandi N. Montreuil, Tulalip News

TULALIP, WA – Tulalip TV viewers will soon be able to watch a new informational program called “Tulalip Health Watch,” which focuses on health issues Native Americans face today.

In the program’s first episode, “Diabetes,” the disease is examined through interviews with health professionals at the Tulalip Karen I. Fryberg Health Clinic. Viewers will learn the fundamental characteristics of diabetes, along with resources available for testing, prevention, and treatment.

Diabetes affects 57 million Americans, and only 8.3 percent are diagnosed. But more shocking are the epidemic proportions of diabetes in Indian Country with 16.2 percent Native Americans and Alaska Natives diagnosed.

According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and Indian Health Service, Native Americans are at a 2.2 times higher risk than their non-Indian counterparts. Between 1994 and 2004 there was a 68 percent increase in diabetes diagnosis in American Indian and Alaska Native youth, aged 15-19 years old.

In “Diabetes,” viewers will learn how a poor diet, lack of regular exercise, and a genetic pre-disposition are the leading contributing factors for 95 percent of American Indians and Alaska Native with Type 2 diabetes, and 30 percent with THW---Diabetes-BryanCooper-2pre-diabetes.

Viewers will also learn how clinic staff incorporates Tulalip culture and traditions into programs available at the clinic for diabetes education, prevention, and management.

“The providers that we have here are great. The Tribe is putting money into this clinic and our goal is to be here with an open mind and heart, and to be a partner here for them regarding their health needs. We have a collaborative team here that you don’t see at other clinics,” said Bryan Cooper, Tulalip Karen I. Fryberg Health Clinic Nurse Practitioner in “Diabetes.”

“Tulalip Health Watch,” will air this summer. Future episodes will explore heart disease, obesity, and other health issues Native Americans face.

You can watch “Tulalip Health Watch” on Tulalip TV at www.tulaliptv.com or on channel 99 on Tulalip Cable.

 

Brandi N. Montreuil: 360-913-5402; bmontreuil@tulaliptribes-nsn.gov

Live broadcast of leadership swearing in connects Tulalip tribal members across the globe

Photo/ Brandi N. Montreuil, Tulalip News

Photo/ Brandi N. Montreuil, Tulalip News

By Brandi N. Montreuil, Tulalip News

TULALIP – Tulalip TV performed a mock video set up yesterday morning in the Tulalip Tribes Board Room to work out any kinks before the first live airing of Tulalip leadership being sworn in.

While live broadcast isn’t new to Tulalip TV, a live broadcast of a swearing in ceremony of Tulalip Board members is.

Tomorrow’s first regular board meeting of the month will mark the change in leadership for Tulalip Tribes. Herman Williams Sr. and Les Parks will replace Mel Sheldon Jr. and Chuck James. Per the Tulalip Constitution, newly elected Board of Directors are to be installed during the first regular board meeting following the election, which is held on the first Saturday of each month.

Photo/ Brandi N. Montreuil, Tulalip News

Photo/ Brandi N. Montreuil, Tulalip News

Although the first regular board meeting is open to all Tulalip tribal members, not everyone is able to attend due to prior engagements, limited space in the Tulalip Board Room, or other circumstances.

The live broadcast will reach nearly 1,400 Tulalip tribal members who live off reservation, and around the world.

In addition to live streaming at www.tulaliptv.com, the broadcast will be aired lived on channel 99.

Brian Berry, Tulalip TV Director of Video, tests audio feed for the first live broadcast of Tulalip board member swearing in on April 5.Photo/ Brandi N. Montreuil, Tulalip News

Brian Berry, Tulalip TV Director of Video, tests audio feed for the first live broadcast of Tulalip board member swearing in on April 5.
Photo/ Brandi N. Montreuil, Tulalip News

“Live coverage is an amazing tool to keep Tulalip citizens informed and connected, especially when they live off reservation,” said Tulalip Communications manager Niki Cleary. “One of the goals of the Communications Department is to keep tribal members educated and informed about issues facing the tribe so that they can make educated decisions about, and participate fully in, tribal governance. Efforts like this one really make a difference, they keep our citizens engaged.”

Tulalip TV provides live broadcast of Marysville School District’s Heritage High School sports and the Tulalip Graduation Banquet.

Mike Sarich, Tulalip TV Associate Producer checks camera placement during test set up for first live broadcast of Tulalip board member swearing in on April 5.Photo/ Brandi N. Montreuil, Tulalip News

Mike Sarich, Tulalip TV Associate Producer checks camera placement during test set up for first live broadcast of Tulalip board member swearing in on April 5.
Photo/ Brandi N. Montreuil, Tulalip News

“Every year the Communications Department evolves to meet the needs of the community,” Cleary went on to say. “In the last few years we have added Tulalip News, an online, expanded version of the See-Yaht-Sub. We added new on-camera talent for Heritage Sports coverage, as well as instant replay during games. This year we are working on live coverage of events, when possible, and more interaction with our citizens through social media.”

“At General Council meetings and over the last couple of years we’ve heard increasing requests for transparency and community involvement, hopefully this is just the beginning. We are always open to suggestions from our community to make our department more responsive and effective for our citizens,” Cleary said.

Tomorrow’s live broadcast will begin at 9:00 a.m. and can be viewed online at www.tulaliptv.com, and channel 99.

If you have an idea, a critique, or just want to share your thoughts, please email, ncleary@tulaliptribes-nsn.gov , or message her on facebook.com/nikicleary. You can also reach See-Yaht-Sub/ Tulalip News staff at editor@tulaliptribes-nsn.gov.

 

 

Brandi N. Montreuil: 360-913-5402; bmontreuil@tulaliptribes-nsn.gov