Local schools get increased support through New Dawn Security

By Brandi N. Montreuil, Tulalip News

TULALIP – A security operations management firm called New Dawn Security has partnered with Tulalip Police Department to assess risks and develop plans to mitigate risks. New Dawn who primarily works with school districts was approached last summer by Tulalip Police Chief Carlos Echevarria who saw a need for an increased risk assessment plan at the Tulalip/ Marysville School Campus, which includes the Quil Ceda & Tulalip Elementary, Heritage High School, 10th Street Middle School and Arts & Technology High School.

“I met Sean Spellecy at a meeting hosted by the Marysville Police Department where he was presenting on New Dawn. We have all heard of the statistics across Indian country about violence and crime. So when we look at Indian country violence, and children exposed to violence and drugs, we see there is a need in our tribal communities for our children to be safe and that also includes the one place they spend the most time at. When Sean’s presentation included the 26 Safe School Standards developed by the Department of Justice, I was sold. I knew it was the right thing to do,” said Echevarria.

The set of school safety standards created by the U.S. Department of Education and Department of Justice can be embedded into day-to-day school operations to make schools as safe as possible. New Dawn has developed a system based off the 26 Safe School Standards to measure a school’s safety rating.

“The first thing we do is a prevention assessment. What is currently in place to be able to prevent all of the risks that you could potentially face. This also goes for medical emergencies all the way down to transportation accidents, all of it. Anything that interrupts education environment or harms kids,” said New Dawn Security creator Sean Spellecy, a retired school principal.

During the tenure of Spellecy’s education career, horrendous crimes committed against his students prompted him to develop a program to keep students and schools safe, later called New Dawn Security.

“Ten years ago schools didn’t have to worry about 90 percent of the stuff that they have to worry about today,” said Spellecy.

Evolving monthly plans are developed according to each school’s assessment risks. These plans include training for educators on medical emergency prevention, active shooter prevention protocols, sexual abuse and misconduct protocols, crisis response and increasing police patrols and hosting law enforcement days where students learn how law enforcement work to keep them safe. Assessment risk plans can also include implementing safer locks and alarm systems, assessing the safety of school grounds, like checking for blinds spots where students may gather, anti-bullying, and what to do in case of food allergies.

Spellecy contacted Marysville School District to discuss including all district schools in a service contract following the discussions with Chief Echevarria about schools located on the Tulalip Indian Reservation. The district declined services last August due to budget concerns.

Ray Houser Marysville School District Assistant Superintendent said, “At the point in the school year when New Dawn approached us, we had not set aside specific resources or have a budget line item reserved for their type of service. Graciously New Dawn offered to conduct some piloting of their services, which we thankfully accepted. Following the piloting of New Dawn’s services, we began researching, and continue to research, their service as well as a number of other organizations that provide such services.”

Despite the decline for services by the district, the proximity of the Tulalip/Marysville Campus schools to the reservation compelled Chief Echevarria to seek funding from the Tulalip Tribes Board of Directors to seal a contract for New Dawn services for the schools.

The contract is paid out of the police department’s annual budget. Chief Echevarria said, “I didn’t want the cost of the program to be a hindrance or a deterrent for us. Once I received the go-ahead, I was going to find the funding. It was that important and that much of a need then that I was willing to do that.”

Tulalip Police Department has signed a two-year contract with New Dawn Security.  Evolving monthly plans will be developed based on assessment risk needs.

“Every single staff member at all four schools has been trained on the warning signs of a potentially violent individual and lockdown procedures protocols of the district. They had all been trained on alert, avoid, deny and defend prior to October 24,” said Spellecy.

“Having police in schools helps tremendously. Having cameras in schools helps but that only covers just one or two of the safe school standards that go out throughout the school. There is parent and student education, all this plays a part in keeping schools safe. Each of us shares a piece of this puzzle to make these schools as safe as possible. Times are changing. The role of principals to just focus on education is over, now they have to be experts in every field of safety. If I can alleviate some of that and look at school safety differently, as well as create immediate response plans on what occurs then I believe we are achieving our goals,” said Spellecy.

For more information on the New Dawn Security and the 26 Safe School Standards visit the website www.newdawnsecurity.com.

 

Brandi N. Montreuil: 360-913-5402; bmontreuil@tulalipnews.com

Tulalip Police Department recognize own for outstanding service

Tulalip Police officers during the department's awards banquet, Wednesday, Feb. 11, 2015, at the Tulalip Resort Casino. (Photo courtesy Theresa Sheldon)

Tulalip Police officers during the department’s awards banquet, Wednesday, Feb. 11, 2015, at the Tulalip Resort Casino. (Photo courtesy Theresa Sheldon)

By Brandi N. Montreuil, Tulalip News

TULALIP – “Honoring one honors us all” was the theme of the 2015 Tulalip Police Department Awards Banquet, held Wednesday, February 11, at the Tulalip Resort Casino. The banquet was held in recognition for officers and staff who have demonstrated exceptional professionalism and leadership within their positions as Tulalip Police officers or Tulalip Police staff members.

This year three officers, one staff member and a community member were highlighted for their outstanding work in the department and with the Tulalip community. While all officers and staff put 100 percent into serving the Tulalip community, Tulalip Chief of Police Carlos Echevarria said, “these officers’ and staff members’ work stood out.”
“With such a large staff it’s hard to choose just a select few. They all do such a great job throughout the year,” said Chief Echevarria.

Fish and Wildlife officer Clayton Horne was named Fish and Wildlife Officer of the Year for his service with the police department, while Lorelei Ranney was named Employee of the Year for her outstanding work and dedication in assisting officers and other department staff. The Chief’s Award was presented to Senior Officer Jeremy Mooring for his leadership, integrity, and willingness to go above and beyond the call of duty.

Tulalip Chief of Police Carlos Echevarria presents the  "Officer of the Year" award to K9 officer M.C. Engen and his canine partner Wolfy, Wednesday, Feb. 11, 2015, at the Tulalip Police Department awards banquet held at the Tulalip Resort Casino. (Photo courtesy Theresa Sheldon)

Tulalip Chief of Police Carlos Echevarria presents the “Officer of the Year” award to K9 officer M.C. Engen and his canine partner Wolfy, Wednesday, Feb. 11, 2015, at the Tulalip Police Department awards banquet held at the Tulalip Resort Casino. (Photo courtesy Theresa Sheldon)

When presenting the award, Chief Echevarria had this to say about officer Mooring, “You have consistently performed your duties in an exemplary and professional manner.” Echevarria commended officer Mooring’s can-do attitude and praised his willingness to assist officers by taking on additional shifts when needed and helping to make safer road conditions for travelers in Tulalip.

The prestigious Officer of the Year award was presented to K-9 Officer Wolfy, whose watch ended on January 2, when she lost her battle with cancer. Wolfy’s handler and partner, officer M.C. Engen, received the award in Wolfy’s honor.

“Throughout their partnership, they have assisted in cases with the Tulalip PD Drug Task Force, FBI, DEA, and ATF agencies. We would like to commend you and your partner with the Officer of the Year award for the dedication and commitment you have provided to the department. Your devotion to the community, professionalism and commitment to duty reflected great credit upon yourself, the Tulalip Police Department and the Tulalip Tribes,” said Echevarria to officer Engen.

The department recognized community member Nate Hatch for their Honoring Our Own award, an annual award that is presented to community members who exhibit a commitment to leadership, trust, respect and service above self within the community.

Tulalip Police officer Sherman Pruitt shakes Nate Hatch's hand, Wednesday, Feb 11, 2015, during the Tulalip Police Awards Banquet held at the Tulalip Resort Casino. Hatch was presented the department's "Honoring Our Own" award for his bravery during and after the Oct. 24, 2014 shooting at Marysville High School. He is the only survivor who was shot that day. (Photo courtesy Theresa Sheldon)

Tulalip Police officer Sherman Pruitt shakes Nate Hatch’s hand, Wednesday, Feb 11, 2015, during the Tulalip Police Awards Banquet held at the Tulalip Resort Casino. Hatch was presented the department’s “Honoring Our Own” award for his bravery during and after the Oct. 24, 2014 shooting at Marysville High School. He is the only survivor who was shot that day. (Photo courtesy Theresa Sheldon)

“Nate Hatch, you have shown strong character, a can-do positive attitude, brilliant smile, sense of humor and most importantly, you have been an inspiration to the entire world following the events that occurred on October 24, 2014. Your bravery is second to none and we applaud you,” said Echevarria.

“Our year was cut short. As a tribal member, community member and chief of police it felt as though our year started on January 1 and ended on October 24. I literally cannot tell you what I did from October 24, until the end of the year; it is one large blur. As I look back, I can’t think of a better group of individuals in this police department and as a team that showed great courage, leadership, professionalism and the willingness to go above and beyond for the community, as I did in this group, that I would want to serve with,” said Chief Echevarria.

Wrapping up the banquet, all Tulalip officers and TPD staff members were presented a commemorative coin specially designed for them. Each coin symbolizes the dedication and commitment staff and officers have to keeping the Tulalip community safe.

Tulalip Police Officer Jim Williams. Photo Courtesy Theresa Sheldon

Tulalip Police Officer Jim Williams.
Photo Courtesy Theresa Sheldon

 

Brandi N. Montreuil: 360-913-5402; bmontreuil@tulalipnews.com

 

TPD rolls out new fleet

A 2014 Ford SUV will replace the Tulalip Police Department's older Dodge Charger patrol vehicles. (Tulalip News/ Brandi N. Montreuil)

A 2014 Ford SUV will replace the Tulalip Police Department’s older Dodge Charger patrol vehicles. (Tulalip News/ Brandi N. Montreuil)

By Brandi N. Montreuil, Tulalip News

TULALIP – You may have noticed that the Tulalip Police Department vehicles look a little different lately, in fact, it’s because they are. The department has recently added 15 new patrol vehicles. The new patrol vehicles were purchased using the 2013 COPS grant from the U.S. Department of Justice.

Nearly $800,000 was awarded to TPD to replace 15 patrol vehicles with no cost match required by the Tribe. The new vehicles will replace older patrol cars that have accumulated over 100,000 miles and considered a safety hazard for the officer and the community, in addition to being a burden on the department’s budget.

According to TPD, the department’s officers “respond to an average of 22,000 calls for service each year, make thousands of traffic stops and

Tulalip Police Department new patrol vehicles will feature new graphics on the back with the department's slogan. (Tulalip News/ Brandi N. Montreuil)

Tulalip Police Department new patrol vehicles will feature new graphics on the back with the department’s slogan. (Tulalip News/ Brandi N. Montreuil)

average over 6,600 tribal housing checks per year.” Which according to the department has put a lot of wear and tear on the older patrol cars.

The new 2014 Ford SUVs have been outfitted according to the department’s needs and are replacing the older Dodge Charger models the department has been using. Updated graphics have also been added to the new patrol vehicles. The department’s new slogan, Trust Pride Dedication is featured on the back of each patrol car.

“These vehicles are literally the police officers’ office. Every thing they need is in the vehicle. Having an aging fleet can cause the cost to maintain them skyrocket. The cost to maintain these vehicles comes out of the department’s budget. Having this new fleet ensures the community reliability and safety. New vehicles are safe for the officers and the community,” said Carlos Echevarria, Tulalip Chief of Police.

 

Brandi N. Montreuil: 360-913-5402; bmontreuil@tulalipnews.com

Crime doesn’t pay, but it sure costs

Brandi N. Montreuil, Tulalip News

TULALIP – Due to jail reforms meant to eliminate overcrowding and prevent offender deaths due to medical issues, the Tribe will be spending more than it did in 2014, to book and jail offenders arrested by Tulalip Police Department come 2015.

The Tulalip Tribes passed a motion to adopt resolution 2014-445, approving contracts with the Marysville and Snohomish County jail facilities for 2015, during the October 4, 2014, regular board meeting. This means Tulalip will continue to use the jail facilities to house Tulalip tribal members who commit crimes on the Tulalip Indian Reservation, along with adapting their budget to reflect the increase of jail costs.

Beginning next year it will cost the Tribe $43 to book an offender into the Marysville Police Detention facility and $65 for a daily housing fee. The facility has a 57-bed capacity and services the cities of Marysville, Lake Stevens and Arlington in addition to Tulalip, making space limited and competitive.

To house offenders at Snohomish County Jail, located in Everett, the Tribe currently pays a $95 booking fee and a $66 daily housing fee. In 2015, this will increase to $115 booking fee and $84 daily housing fee.

Tulalip Police Chief Carlos Echevarria says these fees are used to pay for administrative tasks. “Each year it goes up.”

However, the rates for Snohomish County, the most expensive jail facility the Tribe currently uses, depends on the offender’s physical and mental stability when they are booked, determined by the jail staff during the booking process.

According to Echevarria there are three tiers Snohomish County uses to classify offenders. If an offender is mentally and physically stable enough to be housed in general population, then it will cost the Tribe $84 a day come January 2015. If the offender requires medical supervision or medication while incarcerated, then the Tribe will pay a $132 daily housing fee. For offenders requiring mental housing units, it will cost $201 daily.

Due to increased jail costs, police departments are reassessing how jails are being used. Cities are responsible for booking and housing costs on misdemeanor arrests, while counties pick up the tab for felony offenders.

Tulalip Tribes pays 100 percent of the cost out of the Tribes’ hard dollar budget. Unlike cities who have a budget stemmed from tax payers, the Tribe must project each year how much to set aside.

To help keep jail costs from skyrocketing, alternative-sentencing programs are used, such as the Tulalip Tribal Courts Elders Panel, for first-time non-violent offenders. Instead of lengthy jail sentences offenders are asked to complete community service or volunteer within the community along with other requirements.

“The only cost associated to TPD are only for Tulalip tribal members, with the exception of persons we arrest and are being held under special domestic violence criminal jurisdiction – VAWA cases,” said Echevarria. “There isn’t a sure way to project who is going to have to go to jail and how much we need to budget for that.”

 

Brandi N. Montreuil: 360-913-5402; bmontreuil@tulalipnews.com

 

Tulalip selects own as new Police Chief

Tulalip Board of Directors selects Carlos Echevarria as new Chief of Police from Brandi Montreuil on Vimeo.

By Brandi N. Montreuil, Tulalip News

TULALIP – On May 3, Tulalip Tribes Board of Directors made a historical decision when they selected Tulalip tribal member, Carlos Echevarria, to be the new Chief of Police for the Tulalip Police Department.

The 44 year-old FBI National Academy and Northwest School of Police Staff and Command graduate, is the first Tulalip tribal citizen to hold the office of Police Chief post-retrocession, a process where the Tribe took back jurisdiction on tribal lands in 2001.

Tulalip Police Department's new Chief of Police, Carlos Echevarria, takes his oath in front of Tulalip Tribes vice-chairman Les Parks and local law enforcement and service agencies on May 7.  Photo/ Brandi N. Montreuil, Tulalip News

Tulalip Police Department’s new Chief of Police, Carlos Echevarria, takes his oath in front of Tulalip Tribes vice-chairman Les Parks and local law enforcement and service agencies on May 7.
Photo/ Brandi N. Montreuil, Tulalip News

Echevarria, a Tulalip police officer since 2001, has completed several law enforcement trainings and academy programs including the BIA Criminal Jurisdiction and Criminal Investigations in Indian Country, U.S. Department of Justice FBI Basic Indian Country In-Service Training, and SWAT Basic Tap/ Rack Tactical.

“I was literally in shock,” described Echevarria, upon learning of the Board’s decision, and who had been serving as the department’s Interim Chief of Police for 11 months prior.  “I’ve been so humbled by this opportunity and by the outpouring of community support, both internally and externally of Tulalip Tribes, as well as the support of other state and federal agencies that we work closely with. I am truly grateful; I wasn’t expecting it. Words do not describe how excited I am and how I feel to be the first Tulalip tribal member to be the Chief of Police for Tulalip. I am confident I have all the training and experience to do this. I know the community. The community trusts me and my staff trusts me, and I think it was just the right time. I am very fortunate to be in this position.”

Former Tulalip Police Chief, Jay Goss, pins newly appointed Police Chief Carlos Echevarria during the swearing in ceremony held May 7, in the Tulalip Tribes Board Room. Photo/ Brandi N. Montreuil, Tulalip News

Former Tulalip Police Chief, Jay Goss, pins newly appointed Police Chief Carlos Echevarria during the swearing in ceremony held May 7, in the Tulalip Tribes Board Room.
Photo/ Brandi N. Montreuil, Tulalip News

Echevarria, whose his goal was always to become an officer, says his objective for the department will be to focus on collaboration with other tribal departments for safety and community outreach and education.

“My number one goal going forward is to reduce the number of our children that are exposed to violence. And that is far ranging from physical and sexual abuse in the home to school safety,” said Echavarria.

Relying on his training and advice from his mentor, former Tulalip Chief of Police Jay Goss, Echevarria will be starting his career as chief during the first initial Violence Against Women’s Act cases being heard through tribal courts. Tulalip Tribes was selected, along with two other tribes nationwide, to implement special domestic violence criminal jurisdiction under VAWA 2013.

Photo/ Brandi N. Montreuil, Tulalip News

Photo/ Brandi N. Montreuil, Tulalip News

“VAWA was a much needed legislation and now the three pilot tribes have taken on that role of working through many obstacles in working with the Department of Justice to prosecute non-Indians who commit crimes against Native American women in Indian Country.  Once this process is complete the other tribes will have a template, so to speak, to follow and a number of issues will have been worked out and it won’t be as difficult for them,” said Echevarria, whose department will become a model for other tribal police departments in handling VAWA cases, and who have already received requests from other tribal police departments to be kept informed of the process.

Tulalip Police Chief Carlos Echevarria is joined by (left to right) Marysville Police Chief Rick Smith, Shoreline Police Chief Shawn Ledford, Snohomish County Sheriff Ty Trenary, Lake Stevens Interim Police Chief Dan Lorentzen, and Everett Police Chief Kathy Atwood. All who attended Chief Echevarria's swearing in ceremony on May 7. Photo/ Brandi N. Montreuil, Tulalip News

Tulalip Police Chief Carlos Echevarria is joined by (left to right) Marysville Police Chief Rick Smith, Shoreline Police Chief Shawn Ledford, Snohomish County Sheriff Ty Trenary, Lake Stevens Interim Police Chief Dan Lorentzen, and Everett Police Chief Kathy Atwood. All who attended Chief Echevarria’s swearing in ceremony on May 7.
Photo/ Brandi N. Montreuil, Tulalip News

“It’s an exciting time. My belief in moving forward is we will find ways together to further the Tribe’s goal as a whole and make this community as safe as possible for everyone,” Echevarria said.

Echevarria was sworn into office on May 6, and was joined by numerous local law enforcement and service agencies in addition to the Tulalip community. You can watch his swearing in ceremony on Tulalip TV’s Tulalip Matters program at www.tulaliptv.com or on Tulalip broadband on channel 99.

For more information regarding the Tulalip Police Department, please contact them at 360-716-4800. In case of an emergency, please contact 911.

 

Brandi N. Montreuil: 360-913-5402; bmontreuil@tulalipnews.com