In Case of Emergency: CERT trainings prepare Tulalip for Disaster

By Kalvin Valdillez, Tulalip News

Disasters strike at any given moment. Whether it’s weather, like the recent snowstorm in the Pacific Northwest, earthquakes, forest fires or tsunamis, it’s important to be prepared for natural disasters to ensure the safety and survival for yourself, your family and community. Twice a year, the Tulalip Tribes Office of Emergency Management hosts Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) trainings at the Tulalip Administration Building. The course teaches local citizens how to be prepared and how to respond when an unexpected emergency or disaster occurs. Twenty community members recently began their eleven-week CERT journey to help provide a safer tomorrow for Tulalip.

“Throughout this course, you will become more self-reliant and be able to help your community base,” Tulalip Emergency Preparedness Manager, Ashlynn Danielson, explained to the class.  “When a disaster strikes, everyone would like help from professional first responders immediately, but the reality is, bridges can be down and roads can be closed. How many times have we had a windstorm where Marine Drive had several trees down and PUD couldn’t get to us for hours? Our overall goal is to create a more resilient community. We want you to have tools and knowledge to be able to set a shelter in place and be able to help thy neighbor and move forward from there.”

The course is an extensive, interactive program where students must pass a series of tests and emergency drills in order to graduate and receive a certified CERT certificate. The trainings cover fire safety, medical operation and triage, team organization, utility control, and damage assessment as well as search and rescue. Students also assemble their own go-bags, or survival kits, to take home and are encouraged to make go-bags with their families.

“A go-bag is essential and needs to be on hand in case of an emergency,” states CERT Trainer, Eric Cortez. “Your go-bag covers your basic human needs as far as security, shelter, food, water, medical and all the essentials. Go-bags are different for everybody because everyone has different needs. What I normally carry is a knife. I always keep a cutting tool on me because it’s useful. You can do a lot with a cutting tool; you can manufacture other items to make your survival situation better. I also carry a flashlight. A flashlight is used often and it’s the first form of security in most situations. And a bandana for medical purposes.”

In emergency situations, when medical attention is required but cannot be accessed, CERT trainees learn how to provide basic medical assistance until first responders arrive. Students also learn how to properly inspect their neighborhoods for any extensive damage, hazardous areas or injuries to their neighbors; and conduct detailed reports for the proper authorities.

“[CERT] is important to our community because our rez is long,” states CERT student and Tulalip tribal member, Margie Santibanez. “We need to have a plan in place for everybody to be checked on. I think more tribal members need to attend these classes, especially because we have so many housing developments. We need to make sure our people are safe, our elders are safe, our youth are safe and if anyone needs help we can figure out a way as a community.”

“We’ve always been survivors as Indigenous Peoples, so why not be even more prepared?” said Eric. “We survive as a Tribe, we prosper as a Tribe and can get through anything together as a Tribe.”

Current CERT students will complete their training and graduate this spring. The Office of Emergency Management is currently in the process of developing a Teen CERT training program and will begin their next CERT trainings in the Fall. For more details, please contact the Office of Emergency Management at (360) 716-4006.

Heritage Hawks finish 4th at Tri-Districts,  on to Regionals

 

By Micheal Rios, Tulalip News 

After defeating Pope John Paul II in the opening round of the Tri-District Tournament, the Tulalip Heritage Hawks (20-4) had two days to prepare for the #1 ranked Muckleshoot Kings. The game was played at Evergreen Lutheran H.S. in Tacoma on Thursday, February 15.

Muckleshoot entered the game riding a 15-game winning streak and had earned the #1 seed in the tournament. Meanwhile, Tulalip was coming off an exciting home win, but they would be without two key contributors in Nashone Whitebear (ankle) and Paul Shay, Jr. (personal).

In the early going, the Hawks held their own especially on the defensive end where they did a stellar job of keeping the high-octane Muckleshoot offense at bay. Muckleshoot averages 90 points per game and has hung a 100+ on five teams during the regular season. At the end of the 1st quarter, Tulalip trailed 7-14.

In the 2nd quarter, the Hawks would get to within five points, 9-14, but then the defense that had been doing such a good job containing Muckleshoot finally gave way. In only a matter of minutes the Kings went on a 24-3 tear to end the 2nd quarter. Tulalip didn’t have the fire power to mount a comeback and without a full squad it was difficult enough to keep players from exhausting themselves on defense. Tulalip would lose the game 51-88. Josh Iukes led his team with 13 points, while Isaac Comenote added 9 points.

Nothing helps a team forget a loss like returning to the court and getting a W, and the very next day, February 16, the Hawks played Mt. Rainier Lutheran in an epic clash. After a back and forth 1st quarter that saw the teams go bucket for bucket, the score was tied 15-15.

Mt. Rainier got the Hawks in foul trouble and was knocking down their free-throws. The Hawks repeatedly sending their opponent to the free-throw line had put them in a 33-40 hole entering the final quarter. But in the 4th quarter, when it mattered most, the Hawks responded with one of their best stretches of basketball. They were contesting everything on defense and did it without fouling, while on offense Josh Iukes was controlling the tempo and finding his guys for in rhythm buckets. The Hawks won the 4th quarter 19-7 to pull off a crucial 52-47 comeback. Josh led all players in scoring with 17 points.

The victory over Mt. Rainier Lutheran put the Heritage Hawks in the 3rd/4th place game where they would once again play the Lions from Cedar Park Christian. On the year Tulalip had only lost four games and of those four, three had come at the hands of Cedar Park. The inside presence of two strong post players and a highly talented guard had been too much for the Hawks to handle in their previous matchups. Would the fourth time be the charm?

The answer would be no. The Hawks put up a good fight in the 1st half, matching the intensity of Cedar Park. The boys played their best quarter in terms of defense against Cedar Park standout Erwin Weary, holding him to zero buckets in the 1st quarter. That being said, Tulalip still trailed 21-31 at halftime. Then Erwin and Cedar Park got hot in the 3rd quarter to put the game away. Tulalip was outscored 12-25 in the 3rd quarter and went on to lose the game, 50-68.

Even with the loss, the Heritage Hawks had finished 4th in the Tri-District Tournament and clinched a berth in Regionals. They will play on Saturday, February 24, at 2:00p.m. at Jackson High School in Mill Creek. Their opponent is Pope John Paul II, a team the Hawks have already beaten once this year. If they win again, then they’ll be on to State.

Season comes to an end for Lady Hawks

By Micheal Rios, Tulalip News 

For the third straight year, the Tulalip Heritage Lady Hawks basketball team (17-6) made it out of Districts and into the Tri-District Tournament. After losing an opening round game to Clallam Bay, 55-63, the Tulalip girls packed up and traveled to Evergreen Lutheran H.S. in Tacoma. There they would matchup with the Rainier Christian Mustangs in a loser-out game played on Thursday, February 15.

In the 1st quarter, the Lady Hawks took some time getting adjusted to the Mustang defense. Not scoring as they are accustomed to, they still managed to keep the game close by playing top-notch defense of their own. Midway through the quarter it was a tie score, 5-5, before the Mustangs went on a 6-0 run to take an 11-5 lead.

During the 2nd quarter, the Lady Hawks made a concentrated effort to get the ball inside and play through their forwards, Deandra Grant and Krislyn Parks. They both responded by making some buckets in a crowded painted area. Midway through the 2nd quarter, the game was again tied, this time 11-11. A pair of Krislyn free-throws would be the only remaining points for the Lady Hawks in the 1st half, who trailed 13-16 at halftime.

The 2nd half was one to forget as the Lady Hawks just weren’t able to solve the Mustangs defense. Tulalip scored only 9 points the entire 2nd half and saw their season come to an end with a 22-38 loss. Deandra and Krislyn each scored 9 points to lead their team.

Following the loss, the Lady Hawks remained upbeat and proud of all that they had accomplished during the season. After starting 0-3 on the year, they bounced back going a perfect 12-0 in league play, and were only a couple buckets shy of taking 1st place at the District Tournament.

Senior standouts, Keryn Parks and Deanda, ran a lethal two-man game all season that resulted in each of them routinely having big games. Up until the Tri-District Tournament they hadn’t seen a team have the size and athleticism to slow them down. The two captains took a moment to speak on the achievements made this season and how the team had grown.

“The beginning of the season was weird because we went through three different coaches, from Bubba to Tina then switching to Tempest. The changes were drastic and we really didn’t play well together at the start,” reflected senior forward, Deandra Grant. “Towards the middle of the season we starting working well together and our game plan finally clicked. Then by the end of the regular season we really got to connect with each other and that showed in our play. Overall, we improved so much as a team from where we started and we did pretty well in the playoffs.

“My favorite moment of the season came in our last game. Even though it was a playoff loss, while we were losing we still kept our spirits up and showed heart. We didn’t want the season to end and if we lost we knew we were giving it our all.”

Senior guard, Keryn Parks, added, “I felt we grew a lot as a team, especially towards the end and in the playoffs. Yes, we took three losses to end our season, but during that time we came together as a team and worked on our mental game. We did thought exercises and talked about our mindsets in order to become stronger mentally.

“Our three coaches, Tina, Katia, and Tempest did a really good job coaching us all throughout the season. I give props to Tina for pushing us to perform in the classroom and on the basketball court. She wants to see us succeed at school as students, and that really means a lot to us. I appreciate Tempest coming in and, for not knowing any of us girls, she built us up individually. She worked with us one-on-one and showed us how to be better players. Throughout the entire season as a coaching staff they pushed us to do better every single game, in practice, and in the classroom.”

Special Feature: Teen Dating Violence

 

Submitted by Megan Boyle, Tulalip Children’s Advocacy Center

Teen dating violence is a widespread issue that can lead to serious short- and long-term effects.

Victims are often more likely to experience symptoms of depression and anxiety, think about suicide, and engage in unhealthy behaviors, like using tobacco, drugs, and alcohol.

Teen dating violence can occur between current and former dating partners, in person, or electronically. Examples include physical and emotional harm, as well as stalking. Once teens experience violence in one relationship, research has shown they are at significant risk for experiencing violence in another relationship.

According to a study funded by the National Institute of Justice, 69 percent of youth age 12-18 who were either in a relationship or had been in the past year reported being a victim of teen dating violence. Additionally, 63 percent of that same sample acknowledged perpetrating violence in a relationship. Psychological abuse was the most common type of abuse victimization reported (over 60 percent), but there were also substantial rates of sexual abuse (18 percent) and physical abuse victimization (18 percent).

Consistent with other adolescent relationship abuse studies, researchers found there was significant overlap between victimization and perpetration; 84 percent of victims also perpetrated abuse in a relationship. This finding has important implications for prevention and intervention; it serves as a reminder that programming should recognize the fluidity of these roles among youth in relationships.

Identifying teen dating violence is key to breaking the cycle. It is critical that teachers, parents, coaches, or any others in a teen’s life maintain awareness and take action to get help when it occurs. It is important that teens who experience dating violence seek help soon after so they can receive services to protect against the potential psychosocial impacts of violence and reduce the likelihood of future violence.

If you or someone you know needs to speak with someone regarding teen dating violence contact the Tulalip Children’s Advocacy Center (360)-716-KIDS(5437).

Tulalip T Spa named Top Ten Spa by Forbes

By Kalvin Valdillez, Tulalip News 

The Forbes Travel Guide recently released their top ten spas to visit for a new year renewal in 2018. Among the many extravagant spas from around the world, including spas in Bali, Okinawa and Cancun, was none other than the luxurious T Spa at the Tulalip Resort Casino. The T Spa has been a favorite relaxation destination among locals, frequent travelers and high rollers alike since first opening their doors nearly a decade ago. Within those short few years, the T Spa has received several accolades for their exceptional body treatments and excellent guest service, including Best Day Spa by King 5’s Best of Western Washington Awards as well as two features on the local TV show, Seattle Refined.

“We’re a Tulalip inspired spa, that’s why we’re named the ‘T’ Spa,” explains Spa Manager, Naomi Ervin.  “We wanted to focus on bringing the beautiful nature of the area to the inside of the spa with the birch trees, cedar saunas and the river rock services. We are 14,000 square feet; we have fourteen treatment rooms, including two VersaSpa spray tan beds. We have a full nail salon, where we do natural nails, as well as a hair salon and we also do teeth whitening.”

The T Spa offers a variety of relaxing body services that are sure to dissolve away the stress from the daily grind and leave you feeling spiritually grounded and tranquil. Such services include massages, facials, manicures, pedicures, milk baths and body wraps. If you wish to experience a little of everything in one service, be sure to inquire about the Vital Relaxation Body Ritual. The spa also accepts Health Care Management Administrators (HMA) insurance for fifty-minute massages, with a choice of a relaxation, deep tissue or hot stone massage.

Aside from the elegant stress relieving services, one of the main attractions of the T Spa are the relaxation rooms which feature eucalyptus steam rooms and dry-cedar saunas. The spa recently completed renovations that saw the addition of a workout area for Resort guests, as well as a revamped boutique which offers an assortment of items such as sage, yoga apparel and BareMinerals makeup as well as hair and skin care products.

“The T Spa is really helpful for people who live a stressful life and is a place where they’ll be able to unwind and relax,” says Naomi. “The whole atmosphere is really relaxing, it’s great for your well-being. It’s important to take care of yourself and focus on your mental wellness as much as your physical appearance. Sometimes when you take care of yourself on the outside, you feel better on the inside. And it’s all about feeling good.”

In the near future, the T Spa plans on revealing their new meditation suite, complete with a Himalayan salt wall. The T Spa is also hosting the Live Love Spa Convention this March, a two-day event for top spa industry leaders from across the nation.  To view a complete list of their services and to book online, please visit TulalipResortCasino.com and for further information, please contact the T Spa at (360) 716-6350.

First Foods Are Ready! Spring Nettle Lasagna Recipe

By Niki Cleary, Tulalip News

On a recent hike my sweetie and I noticed a bright spot of color peeking out from behind the scrubby gray remnants of last year’s underbrush. Nettles, one of the first foods of spring, were perfect for picking. We also noticed a gigantic sign that indicated no harvesting local plants. But now we knew these tasty treats were growing, so we made plans for the next day.

The freezing morning made them a little hard to spot, but we quickly found a patch of nettles. A short half hour of harvesting netted us two grocery bags of the tasty greens. After finishing our hike, we settled down for a cup of fresh nettle tea and got to work on dinner, a spinoff of lasagna minus the noodles and tomatoes and featuring our freshly picked nettles.

You may be thinking, no noodles? No tomatoes? That’s not lasagna. Nailed it! However, it is a tasty and low carb lasagna-like dish. Instead of a traditional tomato sauce, roasted red peppers provided the base for a meaty red sauce and the lasagna noodles were swapped with thin slices of zucchini. If you can’t find nettles, or aren’t interested in risking stings, you can substitute spinach.

If you’ve ever shopped for groceries or cooked with me, you know I believe we vote with our dollars, so when I shop I prioritize local, seasonal, organic and grass fed. If I have to choose, I’ll buy grass fed and organic meat over organic produce. Every year the Environmental Working Group (EWG) produces the dirty dozen and clean 15 lists, which can also help you decide what to buy organic vs. conventionally grown. The dirty dozen are the most pesticide contaminated fruits and vegetables, the clean 15 are the least contaminated, you can find them on the EWG’s website, www.ewg.org.

Spring nettle lasagna

Ingredients:

  • wilted nettles – two grocery bags, fresh
  • 6-8 medium zucchinis – salted and drained

Meat sauce

  • Olive oil
  • 1 large onion, diced
  • 1 cup diced celery
  • 4 cloves of garlic
  • 1 pound of grass fed (preferably organic), ground beef
  • 12 oz package mushrooms, chopped
  • 2, 16oz jars of roasted red peppers, blended until smooth
  • ½ cup fresh basil
  • 1 tsp dried oregano
  • 2 tsp lemon juice
  • Salt/pepper to taste

Parsley cheese mixture

  • ½ cup chopped Parsley
  • 2 eggs
  • 2 cups Ricotta
  • 1 cup Parmesan

Topping

  • 2 cup Parmesan
  • 2 cups grated Mozzarella

Preheat oven to 350, and oil a 9 x 13” baking dish. Prepare Nettles and Zucchini, roasted red peppers and cheese mixture. Prep your nettles by removing the leaves and discarding the stems. Rinse thoroughly to remove dirt or contaminants. Place in a large pot of water, boil until wilted, drain and set aside. Slice zucchini into ¾ inch slices, salt to draw out the moisture and let drain in a colander. Blend roasted red peppers until smooth, using no more than 4 tsp of the reserved liquid (use water if additional liquid is needed) and set aside. Combine parsley, ricotta, and eggs in a small bowl, set aside.

Meat sauce: Coat bottom of pan with olive oil, bring to medium heat. Sauté onions and celery over medium heat until onions are translucent. Add garlic, ground beef and mushrooms. Cook until meat is brown and crumbly. Add blended roasted red pepper, basil, oregano and lemon juice. Salt and pepper to taste. Reduce to low heat and simmer for 15-30 minutes to reduce and thicken sauce.

Assemble: In a 9 x 13” baking dish, spoon enough of the meat sauce to cover the bottom of the dish. Layer zucchini slices to cover the dish, then 1/3 of remaining meat sauce, 1/3 of the parsley cheese mixture, and 1/3 of the nettles. Repeat until the ingredients have been used up. Top with parmesan and mozzarella. Bake for about an hour, or until dish is bubbling and cheese is browned. Let cool slightly before slicing.

 

SNAP-Ed offers fun, interactive nutrition course to Tulalip community

By Kalvin Valdillez, Tulalip News 

When you see a class hosted by the Tulalip SNAP-Ed Program it’s safe to say you can expect a little fun and often times, some good eats. The program offers education about nutrition and the importance of exercise, encouraging community members to live healthier lifestyles. SNAP-Ed is known for their Tulalip Walking Club that meets each week to walk about the reservation and their Wellness Wednesdays classes, formerly held at the Tulalip Administration Building. Maybe it’s the food, maybe it’s the activities or perhaps it’s the prizes, but whatever it is, the participants of a SNAP-Ed training have a good time, showcased by their many smiles and laughter. Which is why it’s no surprise that SNAP-Ed’s most recent endeavor is extremely popular.

If you haven’t heard of the Eat Smart, Be Active, Nutrition and Cooking course, you’re going to want to get in line for the next series of classes so you can experience the nine-week health journey in its entirety. Classes are currently held every Wednesday, until March 21, from 5:00 p.m. to approximately 6:30 p.m. at the Tulalip Dining Hall where the students are gaining much of knowledge about buying, preparing and consuming healthy meals.

Tribal communities nationwide face health issues such as diabetes and hypertension due largely in part to assimilation and a disconnect from traditional foods. Whether its lack of time or kitchen knowledge, many Americans end up hitting the drive-thru or placing an Uber Eats order at the end of the day.

The Eat Smart, Be Active course not only teaches participants how to cook, it also teaches how to meal plan, put together a budget-friendly grocery list, the nutritional value of foods and how to incorporate more veggies into your diet. The classes also include exercise breaks throughout the daily lesson plan, which the students enthusiastically participate in.

“There are four really important exercises that you need to know,” explains SNAP-Ed Nutritionist, AnneCherise Jensen. “You need to know muscle strengthening exercises, cardio, stretching or yoga and also bone strengthening exercises. Today we did a cardio pyramid which is a series of exercises to get our heart rate up, get fresh oxygen to the brain and wake us up a little bit.

“We’re all about promoting an active, healthy lifestyle. We’re trying to teach people different ways to prevent disease before it starts happening,” she continues. “I personally believe that it all starts with diet and exercise. Food is medicine. The food that we eat determines our health and our future; food affects our mood spiritually, mentally and physically. All good things come from eating good, healthy foods.”

After their daily nutritional lesson, the students enter the kitchen where they work together to prepare a meal. SNAP-Ed incorporates fresh ingredients with hand-picked produce and also raffles off reusable grocery bags filled with ingredients that the students can use to make recipes at home.

“I come to the classes to learn more about being healthy and being active,” states Tulalip tribal member, Tyler Fryberg. “I like everything in the class because it’s all useful. The exercises are fun. I enjoy cooking, it’s fun making new recipes. It’s just a really fun class.”

Fun might be the best way to describe the Eat Smart, Be Active course as Tyler’s views were shared by a group of co-workers from the Tulalip Resort Casino as well as numerous community members.

“These nine weeks focus on important areas where we can make changes in our life, to make a positive impact on our health and our overall well-being,” states AnneCherise. “There’s lots of one-on-one activities, everybody gets to cook, we learn new things and try new recipes. It’s a great program to get a fresh new start on a journey to a healthier you.”

For more information, including how to sign-up for the next course, please contact SNAP-Ed at (360) 716-5632.