Hawks get routed by Darrington, then blowout Providence by 50+

By Micheal Rios, Tulalip News

The Tulalip Heritage boys basketball program is coming off of back-to-back years in which the team won at least 20 games and made it past District, Tri-District and Regional playoffs, all the way to State. An historic achievement for any program. 

Now, entering the 2019-2020 season, the Hawks look to repeat past success with its current roster of rez ball hoopers. Gone are four seniors from last season, but in their place are five current seniors including standout guards Leno Vela, Josh Miranda and Isaac Comenote. They took to the court on Saturday, December 7 in their season opener. A home game versus the Darrington Loggers.

Tulalip struggled mightily from the jump. Shots weren’t falling, no one was rebounding and meanwhile Darrington took advantage of every opportunity afforded to them with a taller, heftier lineup.  The score was 4-19 after the opening quarter, and that deficit ballooned to 11-40 at halftime. 

In the 2nd half, the home crowd was anxious for some kind of spark to ignite their team’s offense. It never happened. Instead, the lack of shot making and rebounding continued. Tulalip ended up on the wrong side of a lopsided 32-68 loss. It was the lowest scoring output from a Tulalip Hawks team in nearly 3 years; a December 28, 2016 defeat to Lummi, 31-65.

With only two days between games, the boys had to make use of some selective amnesia and quickly forget about everything that went wrong vs. Darrington and focus on their next opponent. Tulalip hosted the Highlanders from Providence Classical Christian on Monday, December 9.

What a difference a game makes. The Hawks came out firing on all cylinders offensively, while relentlessly locking up Providence defensively. Jumping out to a 25-9 lead at the end of the 1st quarter, the boys kept the pedal to the metal and took a 39 point lead into halftime, up 52-13. 

During one stretch, senior point guard Leno Vela went on a 16-0 run all by himself. He caught fire from downtown hitting four consecutive 3-pointers and then came up with back-to-back steals that he converted into layups. His scoring barrage fired up the home crowd and his fellow teammates who cheered him on.

“My shooting felt really good and my teammates found me when I got hot,” said Leno afterwards. “They trusted me and I was able to come up with buckets.”

The Hawks defense continued to feast on a Providence team that struggled with ball handling and routinely coughed up the ball via steal or bad pass. And with every turnover forced came the accustomed run-and-gun offense Tulalip is known for. All the starters scored multiple buckets in transition and hit a 3-pointer. 

At the end of the 3rd quarter, Tulalip led 73-18. With the result no longer in doubt the bench came in to finish the game. The final score was 81-27. Leno led all scorers with 33 points, while Josh Miranda added 13 points.

A 54 point victory over Providence is a good way to wash away the stain from their opening loss to Darrington. 

“We played our style of basketball tonight. I wanted them to be aggressive and attack the basket because we really didn’t do that in our last game,” explained Coach Fryberg after the blowout win. “Their aggressiveness resulted in lots of looks close to the basket and got them to the free-throw line. Defensively, we locked in early and pressed the issue throughout.”

Tulalip basketball is on the road for their next 3 games. They’ll return home on Thursday, December 19 for a matchup with Grace Academy. 

Lady Hawks basketball returns with home opener vs. Darrington

By Micheal Rios, Tulalip News

The Tulalip Heritage girls basketball team opened their 2019-2020 season with a home game on Saturday, December 7. They hosted the Darrington Loggers at Francy J. Sheldon gymnasium.

Last season the Lady Hawks finished with a lackluster (4-12) record. In the weeks leading up to this new season the coaching staff opted to focus on pace of play and defensive hustle as their areas for improvement. Assistant coach Jeff Monsegur said, “We spent a lot of time working on cardio, just running and more running, so that we can have a quicker tempo on offense and keep our defense up in the 2nd half of games.”

With a few weeks of hearty conditioning and practice reps the Lady Hawks were prepared to make their team debut with a renewed sense of vigor and upbeat energy.

In their opening game against Darrington, their girls showcased a quicker pace right out the gate. They took an 8-2 lead after back-to-back buckets by Krislyn Parks and a 3-pointer by Deachae Jones. Darrington fought back and tied the game at 12-12 early in the 2nd quarter before employing a full-court defense that stymied the Lady Hawks. At halftime the home team trailed 19-21.

The second half was a highly competitive affair with both teams routinely diving on the hardwood for loose balls and coming up with timely buckets. Darrington opted to double team Jacynta Myles, forcing the Lady Hawks guards to create for themselves. Led by the aggressive driving of Krislyn, who earned a whopping 14 free-throw attempts by drawing fouls, Tulalip stayed within a bucket or two the entire game. 

Down 36-37 with just over two minutes remaining, Darrington went back to their full-court defense and forced Tulalip to commit errant passes that led to three quick turnovers. Even so, with only seconds remaining, the girls had a chance to capture victory when Deachae shot a potential go-ahead 3-pointer. Unfortunately, her attempt fell just short and clanged off the rim for a miss. Tulalip 37, Darrington 41.

Krislyn led the Lady Hawks with 14 points, while Jacynta collected over 20 rebounds. 

“We did so much running over the past three weeks so we wouldn’t burn out in the 2nd half of games, like we did last season. All that running really showed tonight,” reflected Krislyn following the game. “We’ll continue to work on our team hustle and never giving up on any plays.”

“Even when we lost our lead we stayed positive and kept cheering each other on. That attitude really helped us stay in the game,” added Jacynta. And on her huge rebounding total? “Because of my height the team relies on me to get rebounds. I don’t want to let them down so I try to get every one that I can.”

Tulalip basketball is on the road for their next 3 games. They’ll return home on Thursday, December 19 for a matchup with Grace Academy. 

Camas meadow a teacher for future generations

By Micheal Rios, Tulalip News

Tribal elders led a planting ceremony that included University of Washington students, faculty, and visitors on the afternoon of December 3. In the spirit of growing partnerships and sharing the importance of land cultivation, the memorable gathering occurred near the new Burke Museum’s entrance. Home to a future Camas meadow.

“This garden here will be a witness and teacher to something that is very important and sacred to all people, but especially to this land,” said Wanapum tribal elder Rex Buck. “The land has longed for these foods to come back and call it home. And so this is our way, the Burke’s way and the community’s way to recognize this planting as important. It represents a teaching for our children to maintain something sacred in a good way.”

After receiving proper instruction on how to plant budding Camas bulbs, all those in attendance were encouraged to plant multiple bulbs that will transform into stunning purple-blue flowers in a few short seasons. Once fully bloomed, visitors to the University of Washington and Burke Museum will find themselves walking by a Camas meadow, as were once in great abundance in the area prior to colonization. 

A utilitarian plant, food source and medicine, the multi-purpose Camas was and continues to be one of the most important root foods of Indigenous peoples in western North American. Except for choice varieties of dried salmon, no other food item was more widely traded. People traveled great distances to harvest the bulbs and there is some suggestion that plants were dispersed beyond their range by transplanting.*

The part of the plant most revered is actually the bulb. Traditionally, Camas bulbs were pit-cooked for 24-36 hours, which was necessary for the inulin in Camas to convert to fructose. The sweetness of cooked Camas gave it utility as a sweetener and enhancer of other foods, making it highly valuable for trading purposes. The plants stalks and leaves were used for making mattresses. Additionally, Coast Salish tribes used Camas as a cough medicine by boiling it down, straining the juice, and then mixing with honey.

“Camas is medicine that our people have known and understood for thousands and thousands of years,” explained Cedar Moon Woman, Connie McCloud, cultural director of Puyallup Tribe. “The Creator put this plant here for us to nourish our bodies as food and to heal our bodies as medicine. The land knew this medicine would return here today so it would be an educator for our children. If our future generations do not understand their relationship to the Mother Earth, to the trees and to the plants, then they cannot be the protectors she desperately needs.”

The long-awaited planting ceremony and gardening activities have been years in the making, since design plans for the new Burke were first being drawn up. Ultimately, the museum’s surroundings will feature some 80,000 native plants of 60 different species representing different parts of Washington State, ones genetically tied to the region. The spring bloom of purple-blue flowers should be spectacular. This is yet another way to bring the region’s natural history to the public.

“In planning for the new Burke, many of us advocated for having the whole grounds of the museum be a garden to represent the plants that are native to the Pacific Northwest and of value to the Indigenous people who live here,” explained Dr. Richard Olmstead, UW professor and Burke curator. “When Meriwether Lewis came west with the Lewis & Clark Expedition, he was the first European to collect this plant and provide it to western science. In providing a name for it, the Latin name Camassia quamash brings together the two words he had learned in phonetic English that represented the Native American names for this plant species.”

In time, the Camas bulbs planted by environmentally-conscious citizens of all ages and professions will blossom into a sweeping meadow alongside the Burke Museum. The meadow will evoke thoughts of wild prairie lands that once covered much of Washington, during a time when Indigenous people were sole caretakers and Camas was widely known not simply as a flower or plant, but as life giving food and medicine. 

*source: https://plants.usda.gov/plantguide/pdf/cs_caquq.pdf

Two (2) Election Comittee Openings

Please submit your letter of interest by January 6, 2020 at Noon to the Board of Directors Staff. Please submit either by a physical document or by email to: bodofficestaff@tulaliptribes-nsn.gov (this is the only acceptable email for your request).

For questions regarding the term and duties, please contact Rosalie Topaum, Election Chairwoman

Qualifications:  Must be a Tulalip Tribal Member over the age of 18. We meet twice a month, during an election we meet weekly.  This position may require time away from your job bi annually. Lifetime appointment

Duties include:

  • Administer and conduct elections within the Tulalip Tribes boundaries in a manner that will ensure fair and honest elections.
  • Creating and distributing notice for the General Council Election(s);
  • Publicly posting and distributing the list of qualified candidates for upcoming Elections; 
  • Recordation of petitioners, absentee ballots, election results, and related documents;
  • Ensure that elections are conducted fairly and are within the requirements of the Constitution and by-laws; 
  • Safekeeping of Election documentation, materials and results; 
  • Working closely with various Tribal departments or entities 
  • Being impartial and unbiased
  • Maintain confidentiality
  • Facilitate filling of vacant Commission positions in accordance with applicable law

Franklyn “Frank” P. Roff

Franklyn P. Roff

Franklyn “Frank” P. Roff, 88 of Monroe, WA, passed away November 23, 2019. A celebration of Frank’s life will be held Saturday, January 18, 2020 at 11:00 am at Schaefer-Shipman Funeral Home, Marysville, WA, with inurnment to follow at Mission Beach Cemetery, Tulalip, WA.

James D. Adams

James D. (Jim) Adams James (Jim) Adams 65, passed away November 30, 2019 at Providence Hospital in Everett, Washington. Jim was born in Wichita, Kansas on January 29, 1954. Jim was preceded in death by his son, Chase R. Adams; mother, Mildred Adams, father, Eugene Adams; brother-in-law, Ray Ribaud and aunts, uncles, cousins, grandparents on both sides of his family. He is survived by his wife, Ellene L. Adams and son, Jaret J. Adams; sister, Marcia Ribaud and brother, Mike Adams. Jim was an uncle and great uncle to many nieces and nephews. Both his mother and father’s families originated from Oklahoma state. Jim’s family moved to various states due to his fathers work for the Boeing Aeronautics company living in California, Louisiana and Washington where Jim met and married his wife of 40 years, Ellene and where both sons, Jaret and Chase, were born at Providence Hospital in Everett. Jim attended college and earned his CPA license. Jim, his brother, and father all worked for the Boeing company in Everett where Jim became a Lead in the company. Jim’s athletic career began in his early school years with basketball, football and was pitcher for his baseball team. He continued to play softball as a pitcher through college but eventually ended baseball thereafter. Jim had many friends during his lifetime and had had many adventures. He lived a full life and was very much loved and admired for who he was as an individual, friend and family member. Jim will be missed by so many. God bless him and keep him. A celebration of Jim’s Life to be held Tuesday, December 10, 2019 at 12:00 Noon at Schaefer-Shipman Funeral Home, Marysville, WA.

Renee Kathy Lou (Simpson) Olson (1962 – 2019)

Renee Kathy Lou (Simpson) Olson was born on March 23, 1962 to Dawn and Glenn Simpson in Everett, Washington, she joined her family on the other side on November 28, 2019 at the Evergreen Hospice Center in Kirkland, Washington. She is survived by her husband, Todd Olson; children, Tashina (Claudio), Tyrone (Cassandra) Brisbois Sr., TJ (Tah-sheena) Laramie; mother, Dawn Simpson; sisters, Deb (Howard) Brown, April (Rocky) Brisbois and Sjeabon Simpson; grand children, Yessenia, Evelyn, Mauricio, Eternity, Kamri, Tyrone, Jr., Ayden, Madison, Jackson, Jameson, Gabriella, Tyson, Trinity, Tara, Teairra and Theodore; aunts, Ginnie Carpenter, Joy Lacy, Joann Jones and Millie Jones; uncles, Dale (Barbara) Jones, Richard (Toby) Jones, Marvin Jones and Delmer Jones; daughter-in-law, Seanna Olson and many cousins, nieces and nephews in the Jones, Brown, Retasket, Lacy, Carpenter, Simpson, Dunn, Comenote, Hudson and Young Families. She joined her father, Glenn Simpson, daughter, Bridgette (Simpson) Martin, sister, Sharon Kae (Simpson) Comenote, sister-in-law, Kim (Taylor) Simpson; grandparents, George and Luella Jones, Ada Tipton and Aubrey Simpson; aunts, Caroline “Uppy” Thornberry, LaVerne Jones, Gloria St. Germaine, Lorraine Jones, Phyllis Lowe and Bev Jones; uncles, Stan Jones Sr., Alpheus Jones Sr., Lynn “Stomper” Jones, Norman Jones, Billy Jones, Chucky Jones, Cecil Lacy, George Carpenter, Bob Thornberry and Howard St. Germaine, her dog “Scrappy CoCo” on the other side. Funeral Services to be held Monday, December 9, 2019 at 10:30 am at the Tulalip Gym.

Marvin Napoleon Jr.

Oct. 2, 1951- Nov. 27, 2019 Born October 2, 1951 in Bremerton, WA to Marvin Napoleon Sr. and Susie (Joseph) Napoleon. Marvin went to be with the Lord on the afternoon of November 27, 2019 in Arlington, WA. He graduated High School from Olympia High School in 1969. He then continued his education and attended college at Eastern Washington graduating with his bachelor’s degree. He worked for our people helping the government form the Indian Child Welfare he was one of the first Native Americans to help. He later retired in 1989. For the last 30 years he loved spending time with his family and friends, traveling in his mobile home. He later settled in Tulalip, WA in 1997. Marvin loved his four legged babies, he would take them for their daily walks around the neighborhood. He loved going to bingo, and taking pictures. You never saw him without a camera. He loved watching the Yankees, and Seahawks play. He never missed a game. He enjoyed going to all kinds of events and luncheons. He leaves behind His spouse, Alice Sanches; sons, Joseph Napoleon, Richard Sanchez; sister, Rose (Napoleon) Sicade; grandchildren: Kaylee Napoleon, Richard Sanchez Jr. and Jadin Sanchez; nephew, Frederick Sicade Sr. and nieces, Leandra Napoleon and Tara Parks. He is entering heaven with his parents Marvin and Susie Napoleon Sr; daughter, Jessie Napoleon; brothers, Ron, Don, Terry, Henry, and Sam Napoleon, sister, Ruthanne Napoleon and his two dogs, Bear and Feather; niece, Susan Jones, nephew, Stanton Sicade Sr.; aunts, uncles, cousins and grandparents Visitation is Thursday, December 5, 2019 at 1:00 pm at Schaefer-Shipman Funeral Home with an Interfaith Service following at 6:00 pm at the Tulalip Gym. Funeral Services to be held Friday at 10:00 am at the Tulalip Gym with burial following at Mission Beach Cemetery.

Lori Lynn White Bear

Lori Lynn White Bear 56, left her family too soon while peacefully resting at home on Monday, November 25, 2019 in Tulalip, Washington. She was born November 15, 1963 in Everett, WA to Daniel T. McLean Jr. and Jeanne (Jones) McLean. Lori attended and graduated from Indian Heritage High School in Seattle, WA. Following graduation, she started working with numerous establishments for the Tulalip Tribes for 35 years. She married the love of her life, James White Bear, and they resided in Tulalip. They celebrated 28 years of marriage in June. Lori had a passion for singing, dancing and music. She enjoyed watching her kids play sports especially her sons. Having love for her family, she loved supporting her children, and her grandchildren competing in athletics. Lori is preceded in death by her grandparents, Nora and Dan McLean; along with Arlene (Charles) Holding; Ed and Stan Jones Sr, Gloria and Howard St. Germaine and father, Daniel (Padty) McLean Jr., and father-in-law, Edmund White Bear, and uncle, Stanley (Sony) Jones Jr., and aunt, Gloria Holding. She leaves behind her grandmother, JoAnn Jones; mother, Jeanne McLean; her mother-in-law, Nora White Bear, her husband, James White Bear, her daughter, Jennifer Young; sons, Brandon Williams, James E. White Bear (Kathi), and Nashone White Bear; siblings: Daniel (Mike) McLean III, Kenny McLean (Ginger), Michele Myles (Lee), and Shawn McLean; along with brother-in-law, Edmund Whte Bear Jr., and sisters-in-law, Candace Myers and Amber White Bear; grandchildren, Marqel, Kileya, Devon, Jayden, Brandon Jr., Neveah, Morgan, Maddox, and Colt; aunts, Teri (Billy) Gobin, Gayle Jones, Karen Holding, uncles: Milton McLean and Gary Holding (Karen) and numerous nieces and nephews and nephews. Visitation is on December 3, 2019 1:00 pm at Schaefer-Shipman with an Interfaith service following at 6:00pm at the Tulalip Gym. The funeral service in the morning of December 4, will be at 10:00 am following with the burial at Mission Beach Cemetery.