Warm Beach to launch trauma-informed, equine therapy for Tulalip youth

By Micheal Rios, Tulalip News 

Warm Beach is well-known as the home of The Lights of Christmas, a popular holiday festival featuring dazzling light displays. Not as commonly known, however, is the fact Warm Beach has one of Snohomish County’s largest horse herds offering year-long equestrian programs. The dedicated staff of Warm Beach’s equestrian program are currently developing a trauma-informed therapy course designed specifically for Tulalip foster children. The first-of-its-kind course is anticipated to debut in September.

The inspiration for a tribal specific version of equine therapy came about after Rebecca Black (Quinault), who’s been raising two Tulalip children for four years now, participated in a parent/child camp with horses at Warm Beach. While there she couldn’t help but wonder how much more impactful the camp could be if it were designed for tribal youth and geared towards healing historical traumas.

“I grew up around horses and, being in an abusive foster care system as a young teen myself, there were literally times where the horses saved my life,” shared Rebecca, now a licensed foster care provider. “I wanted my two boys and other tribal youth to experience the healing that horses make possible. It’s so important that we intercede at a younger age because the health outcomes in our communities, especially for our kids in foster care, can really change.”

Rebecca met with Warm Beach executive staff and engaged in a series of productive meetings regarding a camp that not only establishes a working relationship with Tulalip, but also would break down barriers of opportunity for tribal youth. Months’ worth of meetings and cultural education led to an application to the Tulalip Charitable Table and a subsequent grant award to develop a prototype version of equine therapy for Tulalip foster children. 

Tulalip Tribes Chairwoman, Teri Gobin

On the morning of April 25, representatives from Warm Beach Horsemanship met with Chairwoman Teri Gobin, Board of Director Mel Sheldon, and Charitable Contributions Director Marilyn Sheldon to thank them all in culturally appropriate way for the grant funds making the innovative therapy course possible. A brief introduction of what’s to come and how the children will benefit was also detailed.

“Our intent is to use the grant to run a three day trauma-informed, therapeutic program that will cater to serving eight Tulalip children currently in foster care,” explained Lisa Tremain, Horsemanship Director at Warm Beach Camp. “Through the use of horses we’ll be doing activities both mounted and on the ground that help walk the children through various stages of their healing journey. Building relationships, trust and confidence are critical pieces to the healing process that equine therapy offers.” 

“In a therapeutic and safe environment, horses provide unique nonverbal feedback that can facilitate social, physical and cognitive skill development in people of all ages,” added Ginger Reitz, Therapeutic Horsemanship Coordinator.

Tulalip Tribes Board of Director, Mel Sheldon

Two therapeutic horses, Mirage and Cameo, wore ‘Lightening Horse’ blankets courtesy of Eighth Generation. After making their introductions with everyone in attendance, the horses’ blankets were used to wrap Board members Teri and Mel. 

“Our hands go up to you all for your good work,” stated Chairwoman Gobin. “We understand how important work like this is to help people, especially our children, heal from their own personal traumas. It’s often not easy to speak about, but it’s essential if we’re to move forward in a good way.”

Why Study Dentistry?

 

Submitted by Jeanne Steffener, Tulalip Tribes Higher ED

Dentistry is one of the oldest medical professions on earth. “The earliest evidence of dentistry in ancient times dates back to 7000 BC, teeth were found in a Neolithic graveyard located in Pakistan. The teeth have evidence of holes made from primitive dental drills. (1)

“Dentistry is a branch of medicine that is concerned with the study, diagnosis, prevention and treatment of diseases, disorders and conditions of the oral cavity, the maxillofacial area and the adjacent and associated structures. Essentially, dentistry is directed at oral care and dental health maintenance.” (2)

Dental Medicine is a very important component of the primary healthcare professions. This frontline profession is fundamental in disease prevention and intervention while promoting overall wellness in people. Oral health is critical in maintaining our general health, well-being and quality of life. A major portion of dentistry involves the prevention and treatment of tooth decay and gum disease

Dentists  provide services that improve their patients appearance and self-confidence with a wide range of dental procedures. These services promote self-confidence in patients pertaining to their smile. Patients learn about good oral habits through their dentist, promoting good oral health and disease prevention. Dentists interact with people of all ages, cultures and personalities. A dentist’s typical day is both diverse and very interesting.

Dentists in essence are artists. Whether brightening teeth or realigning an entire jaw, the dentist has to have the ability to visualize an aesthetic end result making their patients look their best.

Dentistry offers career opportunities in both the private and public sectors, i.e. private practice, public clinics, teaching, research, public health and administration. A career in dentistry will provide a lifetime of learning on the cutting edge of technology. Careers for women in dentistry are on the forefront as we enter a more inclusive age.

The average income of dentists is in the top 8 percent of U.S. family incomes and the demand for dental care is increasing. With all the marketing, more people are becoming aware of the importance of regular dental care. Geriatric dental care is extremely important for older adults trying to keep their teeth longer. Implant cosmetic surgery is contributes greatly to the growth of this profession.

Dentists usually receive a bachelor’s degree. Then they attend four years of dental school. In addition, dentists have to complete additional qualifications plus continuing education to accommodate a constantly changing field. Dentists also prescribe medications related to patient management. They encourage and promote prevention of oral diseases with regular patient check-ups, cleanings, evaluation and monitoring. 

Other mid-level occupations in the dental field supporting the dentist include registered dental assistants, dental hygienists and dental technicians. Other types of dental positions include dental laboratory technicians and administrative staff. Additional employment opportunities may be available in dental schools, hospitals and companies that manufacture dental prosthetic materials. 

If you have a calling to become a dentist or are interested in other areas of the field, please call the Higher ED staff at 360-716-4888 or email us at highered@tulaliptribes-nsn.gov for assistance with this exciting career opportunity.

Toothworks, https://toothworkscalgary.com/the-history-of-dentistry/

https://carrington.edu/blog/dental/working-in-dentistry-list-of-careers-jobs-in-dental-field/

Tulalip Police Respond to Stabbing at McDonalds

On April 25th, at approximately 8:30 p.m. the Tulalip Police Department (TPD) responded to a call about an assault with a weapon at the McDonalds, 6322 33rd Avenue NE, in Tulalip. Upon arrival, officers made contact with the victim and administered first aid for stab wounds on the top of his scalp. The individual was later transported to an area hospital. TPD coordinated with Snohomish County and Marysville for dog teams to search for the assailants. The area was contained, statements were taken from witnesses, and the crime scene processed for evidence. TPD Detectives were deployed and conducted the investigation.

After a K-9 track, two suspects were captured and identified. Both suspects, one a Tulalip citizen and one a non-Tulalip, were then booked into Snohomish County Jail for aggravated assault and robbery. We learned that the victim and the suspects knew each other and this appears to be a drug related incident that turned into assault/robbery. There is no outstanding threat to the community. TPD is in contact with the FBI to evaluate if this case will be prosecuted federally or in Tribal Court.

The Tulalip Police Department takes seriously the calls and concerns we receive from the community. We are committed to addressing crime when it happens and working to reduce crime in the future. I commend our officers and detectives for their quick response and dedication to the safety of our community. This is an active investigation, anyone with information about the incident is asked to call our tip line at 360-716-5990.